The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Marmot Ether DriClime - Women's Review

The Ether is the only completely lined model in our review, making it best for light activity in cold weather.
Price:  $125 List | $78.99 at MooseJaw
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Added insulation for cold days, durable, relatively wind resistant
Cons:  Bulky, not very packable, not easy to layer with, not water resistant
Manufacturer:   Marmot
By Shey Kiester ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Mar 27, 2018
  • Share this article:
60
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 8
  • Wind Resistance - 20% 8
  • Breathability - 20% 6
  • Durability - 20% 7
  • Weight and Packability - 20% 4
  • Versatility - 10% 5
  • Water Resistance - 10% 5

The Skinny

The Marmot Ether is the only jacket in this review that features a fully lined interior. Our reviewers found this construction to be bulky and cumbersome, and the Ether had a problematic time stacking up next to other contenders that were far more packable and better performing. However, the Ether does offer a unique design for those who do not need the lightest and most packable jacket, but still require some wind resistance, with the added warmth benefit that the fleece lining of this model offers.

Colors Updated
The Ether DriClime is no longer available in the Plum color we tested, but the specs for this wind jacket remain the same.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Marmot Ether is made of 100% Nylon Double Mini Rip and does notfeature a DWR (durable water repellent) finish.

Value


At $125, this piece is more expensive than the Patagonia Houdini ($99), which easily outperforms it according to our rating metrics. However, it is likely to last, and if you're looking for a lined windbreaker to hit the coffee shop or run errands, it is a good choice.

Performance Comparison


The Ether fell behind other models in our review metrics. Most other contenders outperformed it in weight and packability, versatility, and water resistance. Fortunately, it does have some admirable traits that might suit the right user.

Wind Resistance


The Ether performed well compared to other models when it came to wind resistance, largely in part to the fleece-lining that covered the entirety of the jacket. Without this lining, which is not featured on the hood of the jacket, the nylon double mini rip would likely be a bit less resistant to strong gusts. However, with it, the Ether was able to keep out drafts well (except for the hood, which allowed a bit more air through). For a jacket that is more wind resistant, we recommend the Patagonia Houdini or Arc'teryx Squamish.

Though the hood is fleece-free  the rest of the Marmot Ether is lined with a cozy fleece layer.
Though the hood is fleece-free, the rest of the Marmot Ether is lined with a cozy fleece layer.

Breathability


Because this contender has three layers (a fleece lining a double nylon mini rip), it was slightly less breathable than thinner models, like the Black Diamond Alpine Start. Likely because of its thickness, this was the only model that featured armpit ventilation, which our reviewers felt did an adequate job of increasing air movement in these areas. If you are using your windbreaker strictly for wind protection and don't need a piece with added features for breathability, we recommend looking at a jacket like the Eddie Bauer Uplift.

The armpit ventilation of the Ether adds to its breathability but detracts from its wind resistance.
The armpit ventilation of the Ether adds to its breathability but detracts from its wind resistance.

Durability


The Ether was in the middle of the pack in the durability metric. Although none of the jackets showed significant wear during our three-month test period, our testers identified areas of weakness and strength in this area. The Ether had three layers of material, more than other models, which allows it to be a bit more abrasion-resistant in the long run. However, the outer layer is quite thin, and it would be easy to catch this in zippers. More durable pieces, like the Patagonia Houdini or Black Diamond Alpine Start, might be a good choice if you beat up your apparel.

The Marmot Ether  is best used in colder temps or low-output activity  thanks to its fleece lining.
The Marmot Ether is best used in colder temps or low-output activity, thanks to its fleece lining.

Weight and Packability


This metric was the Ether's Achilles heel. With the largest packed size of any of the jackets reviewed, this model is not the right choice for an emergency layer that you throw in your pack and forget about. At 7 ounces, it is just 0.1 ounce heavier than the Black Diamond Alpine Start, but combine this weight with its bulky packed size, and it is easily beat by the Alpine Start, which packs down into a much more compact package. However, if you plan on using your jacket as more of an around-town layer and don't require serious packability, don't let this be a deterrent.

A comparison between the relatively large Marmot Ether (right) and Patagonia Houdini (left)  the smallest windbreaker in this review.
A comparison between the relatively large Marmot Ether (right) and Patagonia Houdini (left), the smallest windbreaker in this review.

Versatility


This piece performed towards the bottom of the versatility metric out of any model reviewed, largely because of its fleece-lined interior. Our reviewers found that this fleece was prone to catching on base layers, making it difficult and uncomfortable to layer this jacket over the top of another layer. Additionally, the larger packed size makes it a bit difficult to imagine packing this jacket on a lightweight mission; whether you're hiking, climbing, or biking, space is usually somewhat of a premium. If your space is not at a premium, don't let the larger packed size affect your decision. With that said, the Ether does feature a harness clip loop so you can carry it easily while climbing. More versatile jackets include the Black Diamond Alpine Start and Rab Windveil.

The fleece lining of the Marmot won't let it compact very small and tends to catch on underlayers.
The fleece lining of the Marmot won't let it compact very small and tends to catch on underlayers.

Water Resistance


This was one of only three contenders that did not feature a DWR (durable water repellent) finish. As a result, it was a low performer when it came to water resistance. The fleece lining does provide an added barrier if you are caught in unexpected precip, but this fleece lining will take a while to dry, and you may become cold during the process.

The Ether lacks a DWR finish  and it won't handle light precip as well as a jacket that is DWR treated.
The Ether lacks a DWR finish, and it won't handle light precip as well as a jacket that is DWR treated.

Best Applications


The Ether is best used as an around-town piece or a jacket for light to moderate exercise on colder days.

The Marmot's extra insulation makes it better for slower paced activities  like playing tug o' war.
The Marmot's extra insulation makes it better for slower paced activities, like playing tug o' war.

Conclusion


As the only fleece-lined windbreaker in our review, the Marmot Ether had a tough time matching the performance of the competition. But if you're looking for a bit of added warmth in your windbreaker, this might be the piece for you.


Shey Kiester