The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Under Armour Outrun The Storm Review

The Outrun The Storm is a weather resistant layer that is heavy and lacking in important features.
Under Armour Outrun The Storm
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Price:  $90 List | $90.00 at Amazon
Pros:  Weather resistant, stretchy, affordable
Cons:  Few features, heavy, does not pack down
Manufacturer:   Under Armour
By Lauren DeLaunay ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 8, 2018
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57
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 12
  • Breathability - 25% 6
  • Weather Resistance - 20% 8
  • Comfort - 20% 6
  • Portability - 20% 4
  • Features - 15% 4

Our Verdict

While on our search for the best budget running jacket, we came across the Under Armour Outrun The Storm. At only $90, we were quickly impressed by its weather resistance. After weeks of testing, however, we were forced to conclude that the Outrun ultimately lacks the features and breathability to make a very useful running layer. We had a had time looking past its weight, especially when it provides comparable coverage to the much lighter and more easily packable Brooks Canopy.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Outrun The Storm is a heavy jacket best used in casual settings, not for running.

Performance Comparison


An up close look at the Outrun The Storm
An up close look at the Outrun The Storm

Breathability


We've said it before, and we'll say it again: breathability is the single most important quality in a running jacket. This can be achieved in a variety of ways, but the two we found most effective were material selection and venting. The Outrun is made with a heavy polyester/elastane blend that, while comfortable, does not allow for much airflow. It is likely as permeable as the average jacket in this review, like The North Face Flight RKT, and is definitely more breathable than the Ultimate Direction Ultra Jacket V2.

One thing that would make this jacket a bit more breathable, and potentially lighter, is venting. The Outrun is one cohesive unit without any changes in material. The Arc'teryx Gaea, for example, used a lighter fabric under the arms and on the back, where we build up the most heat, which was very effective at letting our body get some air.

Weather Resistance


While we wish that the skies would clear every time we stepped out the door for a run, unless you live in southern California, that's probably not going to happen. For the rest of us, we need a layer that can protect us from a wide range of elements. We used and abused every jacket in this review to see how it held up.

The Outrun provides ample wind resistance, though it isn't completely foolproof. We found it to have a similar wind performance to the Canopy. It performs well in rain, though we will warn you that this is not a full-fledged rain jacket. None of the products in this review will keep you completely dry in prolonged periods of precipitation, but this one will definitely help you out during a light shower.

The Outrun has great weather resistance and decent breathability.
The Outrun has great weather resistance and decent breathability.

The last weather feature we tested for was cold temperatures. Many of the lighter jackets in this review provide little to no insulation, so it was great to find a jacket that would keep us warm on chilly days. We'd use this jacket in similar conditions as we would for the Canopy and Icebreaker Rush. It's not as burly as the Gaea and likely wouldn't be enough for true winter conditions, but for spring and fall, this product is right at home.

Comfort


Comfort can mean a lot of different things, and it can also be a pretty personal decision. We gave these jackets to our friends and colleagues to get feedback on their fits and feels by comparing them all side-by-side.

Our testing team found the Outrun to have some positive comfort qualities and some that we didn't like so much. We really appreciate the slight bit of stretch; few jackets in this review had any elasticity, and we thought this was an awesome improvement to mobility. Compared to the Altra Performance, whose tight fit and lack of stretch made us feel very constricted, the Outrun gives us plenty of room to move.

The Outrun runs big  and we suggest sizing down.
The Outrun runs big, and we suggest sizing down.

Too much room, in fact. The fit is a bit off in this jacket, and we think the sizing runs large. We ordered the same size in each of the twelve jackets we tested, and the Outrun was the largest. We recommend sizing down to find the optimal form-fitting look. We liked the materials of the Outrun, but they weren't anything special. This jacket is soft enough to let us forget we had it on, but there's nothing to rave about, like with the cozy wool interior of the Rush.

Portability


Running is unique among many of our favorite outdoor activities in that speed is a pretty crucial factor. We don't want to be held back by our gear, so we set out to see which jackets were the easiest to tote along, whether we were lapping the neighborhood or questing deep into the backcountry.

The first factor we evaluated was weight, plain and simple. We put each jacket on a scale, and we were pretty disappointed with what we found in the Outrun the Storm. At 10.95 ounces, this was one of the heaviest jackets that we tested. Heavier even than the Arc'teryx Gaea, the Outrun features none of the insulation of its competitor, making it nearly impossible to justify the weight. When some of the other contenders weighed in at a third of the weight, we were hard-pressed to venture very far in this layer.

Secondly, we wanted to know how easy it was to bring each jacket with us on our running adventures. The Outrun is lacking in a pocket to pack itself into and is incredibly bulky. Even if we had a backpack with us on our run, this layer would take up a lot of room.

Features


To separate windbreakers and rain jackets from running-specific layers, we dialed in the small features of each jacket. We wanted to know what details each jacket included that appealed directly to runners, and in the process, we identified a few must-haves.

Visibility is a crucial safety factor for runners, especially if you run in urban areas. The Outrun has a small reflective logo on the arm, but it has nothing on the back, where it really counts. This is one feature that led the Canopy to the front of the pack, as its large rear reflective stripe is perfectly designed for runners.

Checking out the small front chest pocket on the Outrun The Storm
Checking out the small front chest pocket on the Outrun The Storm

The Outrun does have thumb loops, which are great for both comfort and warmth, but we found them to be less comfortable than those of the Gaea. This jacket has two front zippered pockets and a chest pocket. We liked having these options and appreciate the chest pocket for reducing bounce. We only wish we could pack this jacket away into the chest pocket.

In this review, we were nearly 50/50 on hoods. The Outrun does have one, but we found it to be a bit too big. It doesn't cinch down, which makes it difficult to keep it on when we're cruising. It also lacks a sturdy brim, like the one of the Ultra Jacket to prevent rain from dripping into our eyes.

Best Applications


The best use for the Outrun is, frankly, not running. It could make a nice light jacket for casual wear or easy hikes, but its heavy weight and lack of features make it a tough choice for runners.

Value


Coming in at $90, the Outrun is one of the least expensive jackets we tested. However, our Best Buy Award winner, the Brooks LSD, is only $85 and is a much better value. We would prefer to see lighter, more breathable fabrics and more runner-friendly features before investing in this product.

Conclusion


It's not that we strongly disliked the Outrun The Storm. But with so many cool, unique, lightweight competitors to choose from, the Outrun fell behind. Though it has above-average breathability, we'd still recommend a more packable option, like the Brooks Canopy.


Lauren DeLaunay