The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Mountain Hardwear CloudSeeker Review

The best choice for backcountry skiing, or even skiing with lift access.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $500 List | $219.99 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  A plethora of ventilation options, great fitting and highly mobile, the best features for skiing
Cons:  Heavy, fairly expensive, collar is a bit tight
Manufacturer:   Mountain Hardwear
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Feb 2, 2018
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73
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 12
  • Weather Protection - 35% 9
  • Weight - 20% 2
  • Mobility and Fit - 20% 7
  • Venting and Breathability - 15% 9
  • Features - 10% 10

Our Verdict

Backcountry skiers need a hardshell jacket that will keep them dry and cool as they sweat their way up a mountain, but will also keep them protected from the snow and wind as they ski back down the mountain. While these demands seem to be the exact circumstances for which waterproof/breathable hardshells were invented, very few have found the perfect balance. Enter the Mountain Hardwear CloudSeeker, designed specifically for backcountry skiing, which meets these demands perfectly. By layering Mountain Hardwear's proprietary Dry.Q Elite air-permeable membrane with a thin 20D stretchy face fabric, this jacket is as mobile as they come, while still providing decent breathability. But it also includes four large zippered vents and a two-way front zipper for the best ventilation of any hardshell we tested. Combined with a feature set that has the skier firmly in mind — powder skirt, Recco reflector, and skin pockets — and you have our Top Pick for Backcountry Skiing.

Color Updates

This favorite from last year is back again in a new selection of colors. See a new option in the photo above. As far as we can tell, all of the features remain the same from the previous version.

October 2018


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Best Buy Award 
Price $219.99 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$394.98 at Backcountry$425.00 at REI
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$263.46 at Amazon$208.93 at REI
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros A plethora of ventilation options, great fitting and highly mobile, the best features for skiingGreat fit, impenetrable weather protection, one of our favorite hoodsLightweight, form fitting, great storm hood, superior construction quality, affordableLightweight, packable, breathes well even without pit zipsStretchy, light, very packable, affordable, quite breathable
Cons Heavy, fairly expensive, collar is a bit tightExpensiveCrinkly and noisy, very little ventilationDrawstrings more difficult to use with gloves on compared to models with cohesive cord locksHand pockets are a bit low, hood is a bit shallow with a helmet on
Bottom Line The best choice for backcountry skiing, or even skiing with lift access.This jacket is a favorite of our testers thanks to its perfect fit and functional features.This hardshell is an alpine climber’s dream, and is really great for skiing as well.A great choice for folks who need weather protection while wanting to go light.The best choice for highly aerobic activities where mobility and breathability are key.
Rating Categories Mountain Hardwear CloudSeeker Summit L5 GTX Pro Arc'teryx Alpha FL Outdoor Research Optimizer Outdoor Research Interstellar
Weather Protection (35%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
7
10
0
6
Weight (20%)
10
0
2
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
Mobility And Fit (20%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
9
Venting And Breathability (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
4
10
0
8
10
0
9
Features (10%)
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
4
Specs Mountain Hardwear... Summit L5 GTX Pro Arc'teryx Alpha FL Outdoor Research... Outdoor Research...
Pit Zips No, but flow-through vents on back of upper arms Yes No Yes No
Measured Weight (Size) 22.4 oz. (M) 16.5 oz. (S) 11 oz. (S) 12.3 oz. (M) 11.5 oz. (L)
Material Air Permeable Dry.Q.Elite 3L membrane with 20D 100% Nylon Stretch Ripstop Gore-Tex Pro 3L—100% nylon Gore-Tex with N40p-X face fabric Gore-Tex Active 3L - 55% Polyester 45% Nylon AscentShell 3L 100% nylon 20D stretch ripstop with 100% polyester 12D backer
Pockets 2 harness compatible handwarmer, 1 chest, 1 interior drop, 1 interior zip media 2 chest, One internal drop in 1 Nepoleon, 1 internal 2 handwarmer, 1 chest, 1 internal 2 handwarmer, 1 chest
Helmet Compatible Hood Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Hood Draw Cords 2 3 3 3 3
Adjustable Cuffs Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Two-Way Front Zipper Yes Yes No Yes No

Our Analysis and Test Results

If it weren't for the fact that the CloudSeeker is the heaviest jacket in this review, it would probably have been the number one overall in our comparative rankings. As it is, it still weighs less than a pound and a half, and the weight conscious can choose to remove the powder skirt and save an additional two ounces. Even so, it was the fourth highest performer, garnering top marks for features and ventilation and breathability. It proved to be no slouch at protecting from the weather as well, ranking right up there with the Dynafit Radical.

Performance Comparison


The CloudSeeker is our Top Pick for Backcountry Skiing because it provides awesome coverage from the storm  as we tested in the blowing snow and wind on a ridge in BC  but also has by far the most ventilation options for the uphill.
The CloudSeeker is our Top Pick for Backcountry Skiing because it provides awesome coverage from the storm, as we tested in the blowing snow and wind on a ridge in BC, but also has by far the most ventilation options for the uphill.

Weather Protection


Overall, the weather protection afforded by the CloudSeeker was found to be excellent. Its hem and sleeves were plenty long for keeping out snow while skiing and never rode up. It also came with a powder skirt, a nice feature for when the snow is really deep, or when riding the lifts and weight is no concern.


When it came to our downpour simulating shower test, we found the CloudSeeker to offer excellent protection. It was completely waterproof, as expected, and we found no leaks at any zippers. The hood was plenty large enough to give full coverage without a helmet but was only barely big enough with a helmet on. It was not as deep or as protective as the slightly better Arc'teryx Alpha FL, or the most protective The North Face Summit L5 FuseForm GTX. The DWR coating remained intact after our test period and did an impressive job of forcing water to bead up and fall off.

Combining lightweight 20D stretch fabric with a Dry.Q.Elite waterproof/breathable membrane  the CloudSeeker did an awesome job of protecting us from falling snow  and from falling in snow  as Dakota is testing here in the steep pow.
Combining lightweight 20D stretch fabric with a Dry.Q.Elite waterproof/breathable membrane, the CloudSeeker did an awesome job of protecting us from falling snow, and from falling in snow, as Dakota is testing here in the steep pow.

Weight


We tested a men's size medium jacket and found it to weigh 1 lb. 6.4 oz. on our independent scale. This was the heavier jackets in this review.


We gave it a score of 2 out of 10, tied with The North Face FuseForm as the lowest score when it came to weight. The weight conscious can unzip the powder skirt to save two ounces, but all the zippers and pockets found on this jacket do come with a cost — weight. However, in the grand scheme, this still isn't very heavy.

Mobility and Fit


Our head tester is 6'0" and weighs around 160 lbs. He has moderately broad shoulders but a skinny torso, and we chose to order a size medium at the behest of Mountain Hardwear's website. It fit fantastic, with enough room in the torso for layering some warmth, but without a tight or baggy cut. The hem was long and easily stayed in place, and the sleeves were also long enough that they never rode up our arms. However, we did find the fit of the collar to be mildly constricting, especially when worn without the hood over our head.


When it came to mobility, this jacket was right up there with the Outdoor Research Interstellar. We loved how quiet the fabric was to move in, and the stretchy 20D face fabric was much appreciated. Because of the constriction we felt in the collar we couldn't score this up there with the best, but still gave it a 7 out of 10, on par with the mobility we felt in the Patagonia Pluma.

The fit of the CloudSeeker  size Medium  was about as perfect as any jacket in this review  as John Walker can attest after running a lap in the Ouray Ice Park. We also loved how the stretch fabric meant it was highly mobile  despite a trimmer fit.
The fit of the CloudSeeker, size Medium, was about as perfect as any jacket in this review, as John Walker can attest after running a lap in the Ouray Ice Park. We also loved how the stretch fabric meant it was highly mobile, despite a trimmer fit.

Venting and Breathability


The CloudSeeker was without doubt among the best performers when it came to venting and breathability, combining an air-permeable Dry.Q Elite membrane with a ton of large, effective vents.


One of the many options for ventilation on the CloudSeeker is this back of the shoulder vent  which despite its difficult to reach location  was very easy to open and close when the going gets hot.
One of the many options for ventilation on the CloudSeeker is this back of the shoulder vent, which despite its difficult to reach location, was very easy to open and close when the going gets hot.

For ventilation, this jacket has two zippers that run along the back of the shoulder down the tricep, similar to the ones found on the Dynafit Radical. It also has two huge front pockets backed with airy mesh that double as vents, and open up almost the entire height of the chest on each side. Finally, the two-way front zipper allows one to open the zipper from the bottom, a nice venting option when it is storming out because the top of the jacket can remain closed. Simply put, no other jacket had even close to the amount of ventilation as this one did, enabling us to wear it comfortably on the uphill even in the full sun.

These giant pockets  found on each side of the chest on the CloudSeeker  also double as huge vents  as you can see the mesh liner inside. Also visible is the hanging mesh pocket  easily big enough to stuff your skins for a quick transition to the downhill.
These giant pockets, found on each side of the chest on the CloudSeeker, also double as huge vents, as you can see the mesh liner inside. Also visible is the hanging mesh pocket, easily big enough to stuff your skins for a quick transition to the downhill.

Features


Besides the large collection of awesome vents that we just described, the CloudSeeker comes with many other features designed for skiing that show its designers put in the time to get things right. It was once again a top scorer with a perfect 10, slightly higher than the Patagonia Pluma because it had more innovative features which also worked great.


The two giant chest vents also serve as massive pockets and have mesh drop pockets sewn onto the inside of them. We found these to be perfect for storing skins on the downhill, enabling one to quickly transition without even needing to take off the pack. It also has a hard-backed chest pocket with a media port, in addition to a zippered internal chest pocket with a media port as well, allowing multiple locations where you can store your phone and still have your headphone cord running inside the jacket. Finally, there is another internal stash pocket, great for a hat, gloves, or extra accessories that you want to keep warm (Clif bar?).

The CloudSeeker has so many pockets! Here is one of the dual internal mesh drop pockets  handy for storing a hat  gloves  snacks  skins  or whatever else you carry with you  but want close at hand  while out in the mountains.
The CloudSeeker has so many pockets! Here is one of the dual internal mesh drop pockets, handy for storing a hat, gloves, snacks, skins, or whatever else you carry with you, but want close at hand, while out in the mountains.

We already mentioned how this jacket has a removable powder skirt that buttons in the front and can attach to the top of your pants or belt. It also comes with a Recco reflector to aid rescue personnel. We love the dual Cohaesive buckles that help tighten the hood in conjunction with pull cords that are on the outside of the collar, our favorite setup for easy adjustability and release with fat gloves on. Also, dual tiny Cohaesive buckles are used for the pull cords on the hem. Overall, there was no aspect of this jacket that seemed to be overlooked or neglected, and everything worked just as well as it could have.

A feature we loved on the CloudSeeker is the Cohaesive cord locks embedded next to the cheek for tightening the fit on the hood. We also love how the pull cords  shown here  are on the outside of the jacket  and thus far easier to quickly tweak and adjust on the fly.
A feature we loved on the CloudSeeker is the Cohaesive cord locks embedded next to the cheek for tightening the fit on the hood. We also love how the pull cords, shown here, are on the outside of the jacket, and thus far easier to quickly tweak and adjust on the fly.

Best Applications


The Mountain Hardwear CloudSeeker is designed specifically with backcountry skiing in mind, and this is where it will excel. It also has a ton of skiing specific features that will make it a perfect choice for skiing at the resorts. While it could easily be called into service for some ice climbing or backpacking, we would likely choose lighter, simpler jackets as our primary choice for these activities.

While the CloudSeeker is mobile and stretchy enough to be a solid hardshell for any winter activity  it really shines in the backcountry  which is why we made it our Top Pick for BC pillow drops!
While the CloudSeeker is mobile and stretchy enough to be a solid hardshell for any winter activity, it really shines in the backcountry, which is why we made it our Top Pick for BC pillow drops!

Value


This jacket retails for $500. While this is not cheap, it is also not as expensive as a few of the other hardshells in this review. It was one of the highest scorers in our testing and was worthy of our Top Pick award. If you intend to use it for shredding the backcountry, we think it is certainly worth the money and presents a good value.

Not content to simply call the CloudSeeker a skiing jacket  we took it for a few pitches at the Ouray Ice Park and found that its protection  mobility  and even features were just as equally suited to steep ice as steep powder.
Not content to simply call the CloudSeeker a skiing jacket, we took it for a few pitches at the Ouray Ice Park and found that its protection, mobility, and even features were just as equally suited to steep ice as steep powder.

Conclusion


The Mountain Hardwear CloudSeeker is a unique jacket which has many backcountry skiing related features that we have not seen on a three-layer hardshell before. The most notable of these is its very liberal use of vents that double as large pockets suitable for skins or gloves. It was versatile and perfectly suited for both the uphill and downhill and was one of our testers' favorite jackets to wear.

The CloudSeeker protects as well on the downhill as it ventilates on the uphill  and Dakota is about to make sure of that fact in the steep and deep trees.
The CloudSeeker protects as well on the downhill as it ventilates on the uphill, and Dakota is about to make sure of that fact in the steep and deep trees.


Andy Wellman