The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Edelrid Eddy Review

For gym climbing and easy-access crags, this device plays it safe.
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Price:  $140 List | $139.95 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Anti-panic lowering handle, durable, better for lefties
Cons:  Heavy, huge, and expensive
Manufacturer:   Edelrid
By Andy Wellman & Jack Cramer  ⋅  Apr 24, 2019
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58
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 15
  • Catch and Bite - 30% 8
  • Lowering and Rappelling - 30% 5
  • Feeding Slack - 20% 5
  • Weight and Bulk - 10% 2
  • Auto Block - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The Edelrid Eddy has been around for a while but has yet to gain much popularity. Although it may look like our Editors' Choice winner, the Petzl GriGri, it weighs twice as much and costs more. The Eddy does have a few benefits over the GriGri: it's smoother with thick ropes (>10.0mm), more durable, and features an anti-panic lowering mechanism. This mechanism stops the rope if the belayer pulls the handle too hard or loses control during descent. For these reasons, it's one of our favorite devices for pure top-roping. At one time the Eddy would have been our recommendation for safety-minded climbers. However, the Camp Matik came out recently and is now our favorite in that respect.


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Edelrid Eddy
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $139.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$82.39 at REI
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Pros Anti-panic lowering handle, durable, better for leftiesEasy catch and hold, feeds slack smoothly, smooth lowering, handles ropes down to 8.5mmGreat for belaying seconds on multi-pitch climbs, durable, good valueCompact, safe and ergonomic way to pay out slack, a bit less expensive than GriGriLightweight, easy to unlock, great for belaying two skinny ropes
Cons Heavy, huge, and expensiveA bit clunky, can only use one rope, takes time to master techniquesHeavier than the ReversoMethod of clipping to harness is counter-intuitive, unlocking device under tension takes some practice, easy to lower too quicklySofter aluminum seems less durable, not ideal with ropes thicker than 9.5mm
Bottom Line For gym climbing and easy-access crags, this device plays it safe.The gold standard remains the best and most popular belay device available today.The best belay device for multi pitch climbing, rappels, and double rope ascents.Behind the GriGri and +, this is the second best active assist braking device that we have used.A match made in rock heaven for skinny ropes and climbers counting weight.
Rating Categories Edelrid Eddy Petzl GriGri Black Diamond ATC Guide Trango Vergo Petzl Reverso
Catch And Bite (30%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
5
Lowering And Rappelling (30%)
10
0
5
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
9
Feeding Slack (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
Weight And Bulk (10%)
10
0
2
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
9
Auto Block (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
5
10
0
7
10
0
3
Specs Edelrid Eddy Petzl GriGri Black Diamond ATC... Trango Vergo Petzl Reverso
Style Active assisted braking Active assisted braking Auto-block tube Active assisted braking Auto-block tube
Recommended Rope Diameter 9 mm - 11 mm 8.5 mm - 11 mm 7.7 mm - 11 mm 8.9 mm - 10.7 mm 7.5 mm - 11 mm
Weight (oz) 12.8 oz. 6.3 oz. 2.8 oz. 7.1 oz. 2.2 oz.
Double Rope Rap? No No Yes No Yes
Belay off anchor? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Assisted Braking? Yes Yes No Yes No
Warranty 1 year 3 year 1 year 1 year 3 year

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Edelrid Eddy is an active assisted braking belay device.

Performance Comparison


You rig the Edelrid Eddy in the opposite direction of the Petzl GriGri 2. This was tricky to learn but made it a little easier to belay for left-handed climbers.
You rig the Edelrid Eddy in the opposite direction of the Petzl GriGri 2. This was tricky to learn but made it a little easier to belay for left-handed climbers.

Catch/Bite


The Eddy is approved for rope diameters between 9.0 and 11.0 mm. Within this range, it provides a reliable static catch using a cam that locks in place. Taking in more rope will release this cam, but to feed slack again, it has to be manually released. It's not much of an inconvenience, and our testers appreciated the confidence this locking mechanism inspired. Climbers familiar with the GriGri will recognize the Eddy's similar shape. The Eddy's orientation, however, is opposite the GriGri, with the brake strand closer to the belayer's body and the climber strand exiting on the far side. We think this orientation makes the Eddy easier to use left-handed, though it's still not ideal because the lowering handle isn't ambidextrous.

The cam in locked position with the Edelrid Eddy. Unlike the other assisted braking devices  you have to disengage this cam manually before you can start to feed slack again.
The cam in locked position with the Edelrid Eddy. Unlike the other assisted braking devices, you have to disengage this cam manually before you can start to feed slack again.

Lowering/Rappelling


Many injuries have resulted from panicked belayers pulling back too hard on the handle of active-assisted locking devices and dropping their partners to the ground. To prevent this from happening the Eddy's lowering lever is designed to stop the rope when it's pulled too far. To lower a climber properly you have to keep the lever in a half-way position where rope will feed but the device won't lock. Although this is a safety feature that could prevent injuries with beginner belayers, some of our experienced testers were frustrated by the narrow range of the lowering "sweet spot." While the Petzl GriGri+ had a slightly less sensitive lever, the Eddy's sweet spot is larger than the Camp Matik.

The Eddy features an anti-panic lowering mechanism. This is designed to prevent belayers from accidentally lowering their partners too quickly. Proper function is dependent on rope diameter  sheath friction and other variables. Please refer to the owner's manual.
The Eddy features an anti-panic lowering mechanism. This is designed to prevent belayers from accidentally lowering their partners too quickly. Proper function is dependent on rope diameter, sheath friction and other variables. Please refer to the owner's manual.

The Eddy is the smoothest device we tested at lowering with large ropes (>10.5 mm). On some beat up, stiff, static lines we tried rappelling, the Eddy was the only assisted locking device that actually allowed us to descent.

Feeding Slack


Feeding slack with the Eddy is both better and worse than with the GriGri. Better because you can pull the rope through the device faster than the with GriGri, making it easier to keep pace with a leader. But worse because when you do pull too fast, the cam locks in place and won't let you feed anymore until you manually release it. This can create bad short roping issues when the leader unexpectedly jerks the rope, the device locks, and the belayer struggles to release the cam.

The smoothness of taking in rope the Edelrid Eddy made it one of our favorites for top roping.
The smoothness of taking in rope the Edelrid Eddy made it one of our favorites for top roping.

Weight/Bulk


At 13.0 ounces, the Eddy is the heaviest belay device we tried and more than 30% heavier the second heaviest, the Camp Matik. It's also huge, bigger than any other device we tried. On your screen, these 4oz/1 inch differences might not sound significant, but they're impossible to miss with all the devices actually in hand.

The size difference between the four active assisted locking devices. Clockwise from the upper left it's the Edelrid Eddy  Camp Matik  Trango Cinch  and Peztl GriGri 2.
The size difference between the four active assisted locking devices. Clockwise from the upper left it's the Edelrid Eddy, Camp Matik, Trango Cinch, and Peztl GriGri 2.

Auto-block (resistance belaying a second)


When belaying a follower directly off an anchor, the Eddy provided the fourth least resistance. It was bested though by both the Petzl GriGri and +. Still, the Eddy is much easier to belay with from above than popular options like the Black Diamond ATC Guide or Petzl Reverso.

Best Applications


We think the Eddy's high weight limits its practical use to gyms and easy access crags. Its added safety features make it ideal for camps or multi-purpose gyms that introduce lots of people to climbing.

The Edelrid Eddy is smooth and reliable enough for big walls  but would you want to lug its 13.0 oz up a pitch this steep?
The Edelrid Eddy is smooth and reliable enough for big walls, but would you want to lug its 13.0 oz up a pitch this steep?

Value


The Eddy is one of the more expensive belay devices at $140. This is $30 more than the Petzl GriGri, but $20 less than the new GriGri+.

Conclusion


There was a time when the Edelrid Eddy created real competition with the original Petzl GriGri. However, with the introduction of the newest GriGri and +, and as rope diameters have steadily decreased, that is no longer true. Today, the Eddy feels overpriced, overweight, and outmatched in a field of belay devices that has grown lighter and smoother each passing year. Furthermore, shoppers who once looked to the Eddy for maximum safety can now consider the Camp Matik as well.


Andy Wellman & Jack Cramer