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Patagonia 850 Down 30 Review

This lightweight mummy bag design is warm and comfortable but is on the heavier side for our UL category.
Patagonia 850 Down Sleeping Bag 30
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Price:  $400 List | $399.00 at Patagonia
Pros:  Ergonomically shaped foot box, two-way center zipper, comfortable hood enclosure
Cons:  Mummy design isn’t super versatile, can’t open up like quilts
Manufacturer:   Patagonia
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 4, 2019
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66
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 14
  • Warmth - 30% 7
  • Weight - 25% 4
  • Comfort - 20% 9
  • Versatility - 15% 5
  • Features - 10% 9

Our Verdict

The Patagonia 850 Down Sleeping Bag 30 is a first-generation lightweight sleeping bag that incorporates great design features with warmth and high-quality craftsmanship. As one of the higher scoring products in our ultralight review, it deserves recognition as one of the best ultralight mummy bags we have used. As the first sleeping bag offered by Patagonia, it manages to take a refreshing perspective on staying light while not skimping on necessary functionality. While purists may be willing to suffer in the name of shaving ounces, there is a large population of outdoor enthusiasts who love the idea of traveling ultralight, but still want the complete protection from the cold and elements that only comes with a mummy bag. Those people would be advised to check out this fantastic sleeping


Compare to Similar Products

 
Patagonia 850 Down Sleeping Bag 30
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Editors' Choice Award  
Price $399.00 at Patagonia$364.00 at Feathered Friends$300 List$410.00 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$379 List
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Pros Ergonomically shaped foot box, two-way center zipper, comfortable hood enclosureHighest scoring ultralight sleeping bag, best features, and most versatileVery affordable, highly customizable, versatile, lots of featuresWarmth-to-weight ratio, excellent fabric, best bag with a hood, versatileWarm for an ultralight bag, simple and versatile design, box baffle construction, waterproof stuff sack
Cons Mummy design isn’t super versatile, can’t open up like quiltsNot as warm as others (in the version we tested), neck draw cords loosen over timeLong wait for product to be custom made and shipped, foot box draw cord still leaves a little hole, lots of buttons and strapsTight fit, shallow hood, expensiveA little constricting, small foot box, not the best neck draw cord design
Bottom Line This lightweight mummy bag design is warm and comfortable but is on the heavier side for our UL category.The highest scorer because of its versatile design that allows it to be a fully opened blanket or a fully zipped hoodless mummy.Offers the versatility of sleeping under it as a blanket or fully wrapped up, with a huge range of customizable options.A stellar choice for those looking for a warm, lightweight, fully hooded mummy.A top-scoring bag that's warm and versatile enough for full three-season use, while weighing impressively little.
Rating Categories Patagonia 850 Down 30 Flicker 40 UL Revelation 20 Summerlite ZPacks Classic
Warmth (30%)
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
Weight (25%)
10
0
4
10
0
6
10
0
6
10
0
6
10
0
6
Comfort (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
6
10
0
6
Versatility (15%)
10
0
5
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
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8
10
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9
Features (10%)
10
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9
10
0
10
10
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8
10
0
7
10
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5
Specs Patagonia 850 Down... Flicker 40 UL Revelation 20 Summerlite ZPacks Classic
Style Center zip hooded mummy bag Center zip mummy bag or unzipper to be quilt Quilt Hooded Mummy Hoodless mummy
Manufacturer Stated Temperature Rating 30F 40F 20F 32F 20F
Measured weight, bag only (ounces) 26.2 oz 19.1 oz 20.9 oz 19 oz 20.3 oz
Claimed weight from manufacturer (ounces) 25.9 oz 20 oz 20.19 oz 19 oz 19.8 oz
Stuff Sack Weight (ounces) 0.8 oz 0.8 oz 0.6 oz 1 oz 0.9 oz
Stuffed Size 7" x 15" 7" x 10" 7" x 12" 6" x 12" 6" x 12"
Fill Weight unknown 8.4 oz 13 oz 10 oz 13.1 oz
Fill Power 850-fill-power Traceable Down 950+ Goose Down 850 Downtek 850+ goose down 900 fill
Construction Lightweight stitch-through vertical baffle Continuous baffles U shaped baffled quilt Continuous baffle Vertical upper baffles and horizontal lower baffles, box baffle construction
Shell Material .85-oz 15-denier Pertex Quantum w/ DWR Pertex Endurance UL 10D nylon fabric 100% nylon ripstop .70 oz/sqyd (23.7 g/m2) Ventum Ripstop Nylon w/ DWR
Shoulder Girth (inches) Unknown 62" 55" 59" 61"
Hip Girth (inches) Unknown 48" 55" 51" 61"
Foot Girth (inches) Unknown 39" 55" 38" 35"
Zipper Length 1/3 length in center Full length center zip 1/3 length at bottom Full length 3/4 length
Sizes One size Regular, long, and wide Short/regular, regular/regular, regular/wide/ long/wide 5'6", 6', and 6'6" Slim, standard, and broad (girth) short, medium, long, x-long and xx-long (length)
Temp Options ( degrees Fahrenheit) 19, 30F 20, 30, 40F 10, 20, 30, 40F 32F 10, 20, 30, 40F

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Patagonia 850 Down Sleeping Bag 30 is markedly warmer than some fully hooded mummies we tested. We also thought it fit very nicely, and wasn't as short or narrow as warmer competitors. Almost no other bag we tested had an as refined and highly thought-out feature set like this one, so we give a tip of the hat to Patagonia for getting it right the first time. Of course, this bag was quite heavy compared to most of the competition, and also suffered from an inherent lack of versatility in its design.

Performance Comparison


Waking up after a pleasant night spent in the Uncompahgre Wilderness in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado  with the Patagonia model and Editors' Choice Flicker  side by side.
Waking up after a pleasant night spent in the Uncompahgre Wilderness in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, with the Patagonia model and Editors' Choice Flicker, side by side.

Warmth


This bag is rated to 30F by Patagonia, but curiously does not have an EN standard rating even though it has the requisite hood. Regardless, we felt that the rating was quite accurate, and this bag will keep you reasonably warm down to that low temperature, and potentially quite hot at temperatures above 40F. It uses 850 fill-power traceable down contained in skinny, vertically oriented sewn-through baffles in the torso and legs, and horizontally sewn-through baffles in the foot box. Sewn-through design means that the exterior fabric is sewn through to the interior fabric, creating a thin point where there is neither space nor insulation to trap heat. This often isn't as warm as box baffles, but it seemed plenty warm on this bag

While the skinny vertically oriented baffles of this bag are sewn-through  thus creating gaps in the insulation where the stitching is  we found that the overstuffed baffles still manage to do their job of trapping hot air inside  as this was one of the warmest bags in the test.
While the skinny vertically oriented baffles of this bag are sewn-through, thus creating gaps in the insulation where the stitching is, we found that the overstuffed baffles still manage to do their job of trapping hot air inside, as this was one of the warmest bags in the test.

This bag used a number of other design elements that help keep one warm, such as a fat draft tube along the half zipper, a deep and spacious hood that easily covers the top of the head and forehead, and a cinch system that closes off the gap around the face nicely. These features help it to feel far warmer than some similarly rated products.

The purple fabric on the inside of this bag is the same material that Houdini wind shells are made from. While this fabric wasn't uncomfortable  it wasn't quite as slippery smooth as some others. Shown here is the foot box  which is cut to a bigger size than the legs so the feet have more room to rest in their normal position.
The purple fabric on the inside of this bag is the same material that Houdini wind shells are made from. While this fabric wasn't uncomfortable, it wasn't quite as slippery smooth as some others. Shown here is the foot box, which is cut to a bigger size than the legs so the feet have more room to rest in their normal position.

Weight


Our Regular sized bag weighed in at 26.2 ounces (1 lb. 8.2 oz). The included stuff sack, which features two separate drawcords at the top for helping it pack down super small, weighs an additional 0.8 ounces.

We liked how small this mummy bag packed down  and also liked the dual draw cord design of the purple stuff sack that allows one to easily get the bag stuffed all the way  which unfortunately isn't well shown in this photo.
We liked how small this mummy bag packed down, and also liked the dual draw cord design of the purple stuff sack that allows one to easily get the bag stuffed all the way, which unfortunately isn't well shown in this photo.

Besides using less insulation, the only obvious design choices meant to help keep the weight down is a half-length zipper and the lack of a draft collar. There is no doubt that this bag is a bit material heavy.

Comfort


This was one of the most comfortable bags that we tested. The size Regular was plenty big enough for a person 6'0" tall, with some room to spare, something that certainly could not be said about its closest competition. We really loved the cut of the foot box, which was roomier than the width of the legs, acknowledging that feet are indeed different shaped and bigger than calves and lower legs. While all mummy bags have a tendency to feel a bit restricting once you are all zipped up tight inside, this one had enough space to move the arms around, alleviating midnight fits of claustrophobia.

If we had one complaint when it came to comfort, it would be that using the Houdini shell fabric for the inside lining of the bag was a wrong choice. While it isn't specifically uncomfortable, it certainly doesn't feel as nice against the skin as some fabrics we've used. That said, we have to give props for the hood drawcords that live on the outside of the bag, meaning when tightened there are no dangling cord ends hitting you in the face or wrapping around your neck.

For a mummy bag  we thought the design of the Patagonia 850 left a lot of room in the torso section  helping us avoid the feeling of claustrophobia that can be an issue with tighter mummy bags.
For a mummy bag, we thought the design of the Patagonia 850 left a lot of room in the torso section, helping us avoid the feeling of claustrophobia that can be an issue with tighter mummy bags.

Versatility


The hooded mummy design does not naturally lend itself to versatility. In fact, that is probably why so many other lightweight options, such as quilts, came about in the first place. With only a half-length zipper in the front, it is impossible to open this bag up to fully ventilate on a warm night. With the short zipper, there is not even the option of unzipping it all the way and pulling out the feet if they get too hot. For that reason, it scored a paltry 5 out of 10 points when it came to versatility. This bag must be used in temperature conditions within roughly 20 degrees of its minimum rating or it will be too hot.

The two-way zipper on the Patagonia 850 is a versatile feature that allows access to the mid-section and is ideal for managing tie-in points while climbing big walls or during alpine bivies. It is also handy for pulling the draw cords for the neck and hood that live on the outside of the facial opening.
The two-way zipper on the Patagonia 850 is a versatile feature that allows access to the mid-section and is ideal for managing tie-in points while climbing big walls or during alpine bivies. It is also handy for pulling the draw cords for the neck and hood that live on the outside of the facial opening.

We must point out, however, that this bag does have one feature that adds to its versatility — the two-way zipper. This allows one to have an open gap in the zipper, even when it is drawn all the way up to the neck. Besides allowing the hands out to perform whatever tasks may need to be done without fully unzipping, this feature is especially useful while big wall or alpine climbing, as it allows the most convenient way to remain tied in overnight, and alleviates the need to have the rope running down to the harness through the neck opening.

This bag comes with a half-length  center zipper. One thing is for sure about these long  skinny baffles -- they do not allow down to migrate around  creating holes where no insulation is present.
This bag comes with a half-length, center zipper. One thing is for sure about these long, skinny baffles -- they do not allow down to migrate around, creating holes where no insulation is present.

Features


Besides the two-way zipper that we just mentioned above, this bag has some great features, enough to make it one of the highest-rated bags in this metric.

We loved the use of recessed cord lock buckles that live on the inside of the neck fabric, much like the design sometimes seen on puffy jackets. This means no buckle for the face to rub against, and the design also keeps the ends of the neck drawcords on the outside of the bag, rather than dangling around inside as most bags do. We found the hood on this bag to be nice and deep, making the additional weight seem worthwhile. We also liked how it has a zipper draft tube on the inside, but noticed that the zipper itself seems to often get caught on the fabric of this extra baffle.

The deep  heavily insulated hood  combined with the recessed buckles for the draw cords that live inside the fatter tubes by the chin in this photo of the Patagonia 850  are some of the best features we found on a mummy bag.
The deep, heavily insulated hood, combined with the recessed buckles for the draw cords that live inside the fatter tubes by the chin in this photo of the Patagonia 850, are some of the best features we found on a mummy bag.

Value


Since we think that this bag is top quality and is backed by the legendary Patagonia guarantee, it presents a good value, and is very unlikely to be money wasted if it suits your intended uses.

Enjoying sunset and meal time outside  anticipating the arrival of the stars  while backpacking in the East Fork of the Cimarron River  Uncompahgre Wilderness  Colorado.
Enjoying sunset and meal time outside, anticipating the arrival of the stars, while backpacking in the East Fork of the Cimarron River, Uncompahgre Wilderness, Colorado.

Conclusion


The Patagonia 850 Down Sleeping Bag 30 is a high quality, fully hooded mummy bag that is never-the-less impressively lightweight. Although it is among the heavier bags deemed ultralight for our testing purposes, it is particularly warm and has a great set of features that are both useful and function exactly as they are designed. While it will make a good three-season bag for just about anyone, it will particularly shine for summertime alpine and big wall climbing.

The Flicker 40 in grey kept us plenty warm with the side zipper all the way zipped on a night when the low temperature was certainly below 40 degrees. On the other hand  it was downright hot in the Patagonia 850.
The Flicker 40 in grey kept us plenty warm with the side zipper all the way zipped on a night when the low temperature was certainly below 40 degrees. On the other hand, it was downright hot in the Patagonia 850.


Andy Wellman