The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Sea to Summit Comfort Plus Insulated Review

Extreme comfort, great warmth, and stability combine in this bulky camping bed.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $200 List | $199.95 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Outrageously comfortable, dual air chambers are redundant, quiet, warm, stable, and supportive
Cons:  Heavy and expensive
Manufacturer:   Sea to Summit
By Brian Martin ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 5, 2019
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70
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 17
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Weight and Packed Size - 30% 4
  • Warmth - 20% 8
  • Ease of Inflation - 10% 7
  • Durability - 10% 8

Our Verdict

The Sea to Summit Comfort Plus Insulated is an incredibly comfortable, warm, and functional sleeping pad that sacrifices weight for durability and air chamber redundancy. It was so comfortable, in fact, it earned our Top Pick award for Comfort once again. To those who have spent nights out sans pad or on a deflated sleeping pad, the redundant air chambers represent another level of durability. It's not only ultra-comfortable, but the dual air chambers almost guarantee you won't be sleeping on the cold hard ground. This redundant chamber system is unique to the Comfort Plus, making it ultra reliable but also quite a bit heavier than comparable sleeping pads.


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Price $199.95 at REI
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Pros Outrageously comfortable, dual air chambers are redundant, quiet, warm, stable, and supportiveSuperior warmth, small packed size, lightWarm, comfortable pad, great valueLightweight, warm for the weight, packs small, comfortable, versatileLightweight, 3-season warmth, comfortable, easy to inflate and deflate
Cons Heavy and expensiveNarrow, expensiveToo heavy for ultralight enthusiastsExpensive, edges not as stable as other pad designsNarrower than other bargain pads
Bottom Line Extreme comfort, great warmth, and stability combine in this bulky camping bed.This is our go to sleeping pad for a wide variety of applications.This pad is a versatile, comfortable option at a great price.Big weight savings and great all around performance, what more could you want.A versatile, all-around pad at a bargain price.
Rating Categories Comfort Plus Insulated Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Co-op Flash All-Season Insul... Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite REI Co-op Flash Insulated
Comfort (30%)
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
Weight And Packed Size (30%)
10
0
4
10
0
8
10
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6
10
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9
10
0
7
Warmth (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
5
Ease Of Inflation (10%)
10
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7
10
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5
10
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8
10
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5
10
0
8
Durability (10%)
10
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8
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
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5
10
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5
Specs Comfort Plus... Therm-a-Rest... Co-op Flash... Therm-a-Rest... REI Co-op Flash...
Weight 25.5 oz 15 oz 21.6 oz 12 oz 15 oz
Thickness 2.5 in 2.5 in 2 in 2.5 in 2 in
Claimed R Value 5 5.7 5.2 3.2 3.7
Length 72 in 72 in 72 in 72 in 72 in
Packed Volume (L) 3.1 L 1.6 L 2.5 L 1.4 L 1.3 L
Width 21.5 in 20 in 20 in 20 in 20 in
Breaths to Inflate 25-30 27-33 12-14 27-33 12-14
Type Air Construction/Synthetic Insulation Air Construction/Baffled Insulation Air Construction/Synthetic Insulation Air Construction/Baffled Insulation Air Construction/Synthetic Insulation

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Comfort Plus Insulated is the only sleeping pad we tested that utilizes two entirely separate air chambers with separate inflation valves. This design does several things that boost comfort and durability. Pressure in one chamber doesn't cause bounce in the other, and springing a leak in one is trivial as there is always a backup.

Performance Comparison


Comfort or weight  which is more important to you? The Comfort Plus is significantly more comfortable than the Therm-a-rest options but it is also much heavier.
Comfort or weight, which is more important to you? The Comfort Plus is significantly more comfortable than the Therm-a-rest options but it is also much heavier.

Comfort


If you're going to haul extra weight around on your back, it should be for a good reason. The Comfort Plus is an excellent reason to add a bit more weight to your pack, as the dual air chambers and "Air Sprung Cells" lived up to their hype. Our testers noted nearly no pressure points common with other sleeping pads as well as great breathability and warmth from below.


Why two air chambers? At first, this seemed a bit gimmicky as it is rare that our inflatable sleeping pads leak. After the extensive testing period, it became apparent why Sea to Summit utilized this design. The annoying bounce created when shifting around on a sleeping pad was almost eliminated with this design. While our gear testers don't quite understand the physics behind it, the result is a bounce-free sleep.



While we found the elliptical size and shape of the regular size Comfort Plus to be more than adequate for our 5'11" 175 pounds gear tester, there are options for smaller or larger pads and even a rectangular pad if you don't mind sacrificing a bit more weight for the extra wiggle room.

Side and back sleepers alike will appreciate the bounce free feel of the Comfort Plus. Dual air chambers allow you to fine tune the feel of this pad better than any other.
Side and back sleepers alike will appreciate the bounce free feel of the Comfort Plus. Dual air chambers allow you to fine tune the feel of this pad better than any other.

Weight and Packed Size


Sometimes innovation and build construction come at a price, and in the case of the Comfort Plus Insulated, that price is a high weight penalty. For as much love as we lavish on this pad, it's hard not to acknowledge the 28.7 ounce Achilles heel. If you're trying to parse down your kit for the maximum performance to weight ratio, this pad is a far less attractive option when compared with other pads like the Editors' Choice Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm that is a solid 10+ ounces lighter and a tad warmer. While that may not sound like a lot, the weight savings could afford you an entire ultralight shelter or a warmer backpacking sleeping bag. Additionally, you could shave an ounce by choosing a stuff sack other than the included pump sack if you don't mind blowing your pad up the old fashioned way every night.


Some will value the Comfort Plus Insulated's dual-chamber redundancy enough to justify the weight penalty, but supplementing a lightweight pad with a foam one like the Therm-a-Rest Z Lite SOL will net you around 26 ounces with the advantage of being more versatile and more durable overall. If you're sold on the killer features of the Comfort Plus Insulated and don't plan on camping in the snow, consider the uninsulated version that weighs a more manageable 21 ounces.

At 1lb 12.7oz  the Comfort Plus isn't exactly a light weight. The unmatched durability and redundant air chambers are worth the weight.
At 1lb 12.7oz, the Comfort Plus isn't exactly a light weight. The unmatched durability and redundant air chambers are worth the weight.

Warmth


The greatest thermal inefficiency of air construction sleeping pads is the convection of moving air within the pad itself. Any movement (even breathing) causes warm air near your body to mix with cold air near the ground. The dual air chambers, along with synthetic insulation, reduce this convective heat loss by keeping the warmer air trapped next to you. A reflective barrier prevents radiative heat loss.


An R-value of 5 makes this pad close to the top tier of warmth in sleeping pads tested this year as only a couple of pads had higher R-values. While the Comfort Plus was warm, it was significantly heavier and a bit less warm than our Editors' Choice sleeping pad.

Warmth  ease of inflation  and comfort are three very strong reasons to check out the Comfort Plus. It might cost a few extra ounces in your pack but the quality of sleep on this pad was second to none.
Warmth, ease of inflation, and comfort are three very strong reasons to check out the Comfort Plus. It might cost a few extra ounces in your pack but the quality of sleep on this pad was second to none.

Ease of Inflation


The Comfort Plus has our favorite valve system of any sleeping pad. The one-way valve fitted atop a large deflation valve makes inflation, fine adjustments, and deflation super easy, and the valves work so well that inflation or deflation is easy even when you're laying on the pad. Ten breaths on the bottom section and five on top gave us the perfect balance of rigidity and plushness.


The included stuff sack/pump sack was a bit heavy but got the job done. While we have used better pump sacks, having anything to keep from having to huff and puff is welcome. When using the pump sack, it took about the same amount of time to inflate both sides of the pad as when we went on pure lung power.

While the Comfort Plus Insulated wasn't the easiest pad to inflate and deflate  it was very user-friendly. The included pump sack worked well but compared to the Exped Schnozzle  it didn't inflate quite as fast.
While the Comfort Plus Insulated wasn't the easiest pad to inflate and deflate, it was very user-friendly. The included pump sack worked well but compared to the Exped Schnozzle, it didn't inflate quite as fast.

Durability


Made with 40 denier nylon, this pad was up for use directly on the ground. Throughout our testing, we intentionally slept on the ground and used the pad as a chair/couch around camp. Our far from gentle treatment revealed this pad's excellent durability. The outer fabric feels burly and ready for years of use and abuse.


While the outer construction is the same as that of the Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated, we gave the Comfort Plus Insulated two more durability points because of the dual-chamber design. Those who pursue mountaineering, prickly desert environments, or extended trips in the backcountry will have peace of mind thanks to the redundant air chamber that'll get you through the night before using the included patch kit in the morning.

There really isn't any way to compete with redundant air chambers. The Comfort Plus Insulated represents a new way to do inflatable sleeping pads that almost eliminates the chances of being left flat on the ground.
There really isn't any way to compete with redundant air chambers. The Comfort Plus Insulated represents a new way to do inflatable sleeping pads that almost eliminates the chances of being left flat on the ground.

Value


The hefty price tag of the Comfort Plus Insulated is balanced against an excellent set of features and progressive design. It is comfortable enough that it works well for car camping but can be thrown in your back on your next tour. For the same price, you could buy the Editors' Choice Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm.

Conclusion


The Sea to Summit Comfort Plus Insulated is an excellent pad if you value comfort and support over low weight and a small packed size. Across the board, innovative features make for excellent backcountry sleeping experiences on this pad. The supportive air sprung cells are nice, but many testers still prefer smooth surfaces provided by horizontal baffling. In many ways, this pad is the Mercedes Benz of backcountry sleeping pads. You get a lot of great features, and the build quality is high, but it costs a lot and isn't streamlined. Buy this pad if you value comfort, convenience, and novel features over maximum performance per ounce.

This bonafide PCT hiker enjoyed the comfort of this pad  but he doesn't think the extra weight is worth carrying for thousands of miles.
This bonafide PCT hiker enjoyed the comfort of this pad, but he doesn't think the extra weight is worth carrying for thousands of miles.


Brian Martin