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Osprey Stratos 34 Review

An excellent and carefully tailored backpack for the avid day hiker
Osprey Stratos 34
Photo: Osprey
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $160 List | Check Price at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Sturdy suspension, excellent ventilation.
Cons:  Heavy for the small volume, bulky, restricts movement during dynamic activities.
Manufacturer:   Osprey
By Dan Scott ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 13, 2019
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64
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 13
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Weight - 25% 3
  • Versatility - 25% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The Stratos 34 is a great pack for dedicated day hikers. The rigid suspension supports loads of all sizes and holds the pack away from your back for the best ventilation of all the packs we tested. The set of pockets and straps is carefully designed to carry what you need for all-season hiking. The result is a pack that is perfect for hiking but is a little too bulky for day-to-day or multi-sport use. Some people love more feature-rich panel-loaders like this pack, which led us to award it a Top Pick for being the best panel-loader for day hiking.

For carrying large loads for activities like snowshoeing or mountaineering, we prefer packs with better exterior attachment options, but the Stratos is ideal if you prefer very organized, panel-loading packs over top-loaders. Lighter packs with flexible back panels are slightly less ventilating, but can be nicer if you don't need to carry heavy loads or value range of motion.

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Osprey Stratos 34
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Best Buy Award 
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$139 List
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$180.00 at REI$55 List
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Pros Sturdy suspension, excellent ventilationComfortable and stable, intuitive and functional design, modular set-up, utilizes recycled materialsTons of features, fully adjustable, comfortable, well ventilated, separate hydration compartmentComfortable, ultralight, versatile, effective featuresLightweight, only the necessary features, comfortable suspension for the weight
Cons Heavy for the small volume, bulky, restricts movement during dynamic activitiesNon-adjustable frame, large size for minimalist outingsRuns small, side mesh pockets are debatably smallLacks ventilation, lots of cords, steep learning curveUncomfortable with heavy loads, not durable
Bottom Line An excellent and carefully tailored backpack for the avid day hikerTop comfort and stability make this pack the right fit for hauling your gear on any outdoor excursionThis pack offers a time tested versatile design that is ready for any adventureA superb vest-style daypack with excellent features that are ideal for fast and light travelThis pack is an excellent value, providing all-around performance for light and fast activities at a bargain price
Rating Categories Osprey Stratos 34 REI Co-op Traverse 32 Osprey Talon 22 Salomon XA 25 REI Co-op Flash 22
Comfort (25%)
8.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
6.0
Weight (25%)
3.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
Versatility (25%)
7.0
7.0
9.0
5.0
7.0
Ease Of Use (15%)
8.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
8.0
Durability (10%)
7.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
Specs Osprey Stratos 34 REI Co-op Traverse 32 Osprey Talon 22 Salomon XA 25 REI Co-op Flash 22
Volume (liters) 34 L 32 L 22 L 25 L 22 L
Measured Weight (ounces) 50.8 oz 40.0 oz 27.4 oz 15.2 oz 12.6 oz
Back Construction Suspended mesh panel Contured, foam pad Vented, contoured Vented EVA foam Simple foam pad
Hydration Compatibility Internal hydration sleeve Internal hydration sleeve, hook and loop attachment point Externally accessed sleeve, holds up to 3L, bladder not included Internal hydration sleeve, 2 included 500ml soft flasks Internal hydration sleeve
Hipbelt Broad, padded, seamless 1-3/8" webbing, countoured padding, ventilated outer layer Broad, padded, with pockets Thin webbing, non-removeable 3/4" webbing removable
Number of pockets 10 7 9 10 5
Description of Pockets 1 main zippered, 2 elastic top mesh side, 2 waist belt zippered, 1 back zipper and velcro closure, 2 top zippered, 1 bottom zippered, 1 bottom zippered for rain cover 1 main combo top-loader/side panel zip, 1 internal mesh w/ overlap closure (inside of lid), 1 external zip on top of lid, 2 mesh side bottle w/ button closure/expansion, 2 oversized hipbelt zip 1 main compartment zippered, 1 stretchy mesh shoulder strap, 2 waist zippered, 2 side stretchy mesh, 1 back stretchy mesh, 1 top zippered, 1 open hydration reservoir pocket behind back panel 2 front stretch, 2 front flask pockets, 2 front top-of-shoulder stretch, 2 front zippered, 1 main roll-top, 1 large back stretch mesh with clip 1 main top loader, 2 side stretchy mesh, 1 top lid zippered, 1 outer zippered
Materials 420D nylon packcloth 300D recycled ripstop nylon Nylon 82% Polyamide, 18% Polyethylene Nylon
Outside Carry Options Sleeping pad straps (bottom), ice axe loop and bungee holder, front-side pole carry bungee loops Trekking pole lash points, ice axe attachments, daisy chains,attachment loops, compression straps Bungee helmet tab, blinker light patch, ice axe loop and bungee holder, front-side pole carry bungee loops Perimeter double-cinched cord for poles/axes, pole carry on front or back Ice axe loop and bungee holder, daisy chains, attachment loops around back panel
Whistle Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Key Clip Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Other Notable Features Bottom compartment is very large but takes up space in main compartment Steel frame w/ 1 internal stay, hydration tube holder on shoulder strap, included rain cover, water bottle pockets angled forward to allow on the go access Blinker patch, front-side pole carry loops Running-vest style suspension, comes with soft flasks which fit into strap pockets on chest Removeable foam back panel doubles as sit pad, removeable sternum and hip belt straps, attachment loops to add compression cords

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Osprey Stratos family of packs are fully rigid, well ventilated, and designed for organized, avid users. On your back, on foot, very few packs are more comfortable. If you are not walking, however, the rigid frame can get in the way, and the numerous zippered pockets add unnecessary weight if you don't need that level of organization.

Performance Comparison


Overall, the Stratos is right at the top of the heap, but it's not that versatile. This is a "no holds barred" hiker's pack that keeps items large and small in separate, easy to access compartments while maintaining an extremely comfortable fit. In that context, it wins our Top Pick as a panel-loader for day-hiking.

The large volume and larger size of the Stratos 34 makes for a...
The large volume and larger size of the Stratos 34 makes for a bulkier profile on our 5'10" lead tester.
Photo: Rosie De Lise

Comfort


The Stratos really excels in terms of comfort. Osprey invests a great deal in the shape and materials of their packs and all else equal, they make comfortable ones. You can count on it. When that pack is optimized for walking, as the Stratos 34 is, you can expect ergonomic weight distribution, stable load management, comfortable fabrics against your body, and prodigious venting.

It is this pack's venting that sets it apart from other rigid frame, full-suspension packs. The Stratos 34 (and the other sizes in this model line up) features a rigid, suspended back panel that leaves a generous air space behind the wearer's back. This is by far the best solution to manage perspiration. During long, hard days, we never got the terrible feeling of putting on a wet, freezing backpack that we get with other, less ventilated packs.

Other, smaller packs also have a mesh and suspended back panel, but the superstructures on lighter packs tend to be more flexible. You will notice more air flow on the Stratos than most packs. The rigidity of the Stratos structure also lends greater support to your load when the pack is less full. Paradoxically, a full backpack takes on more rigidity, just from the contents, than a less-loaded backpack. The Stratos suspension characteristics are basically the same whether it is stuffed full or if it is holding just a water bottle and jacket.

This shot shows the ventilation channel between the mesh back panel...
This shot shows the ventilation channel between the mesh back panel and the bulk of the pack. This channel remains "open" by virtue of the tensioned back panel and the rigid pack frame.
Photo: Jediah Porter

The mesh fabrics that contact your body on the Stratos are soft and slightly rough. While this roughness irritated our bare skin slightly, it helped the pack stay put during dynamic activities, which led to an overall more comfortable carry. As compared to the unstructured, simple, and ultralight packs, the Stratos is like a luxury piece of furniture.

Up above the trees on Wyoming's Medicine Bow peak, the Stratos 34...
Up above the trees on Wyoming's Medicine Bow peak, the Stratos 34 held clothing for gnarly weather, even though it was cool and comfortable.
Photo: Rosie De Lise

In our standardized calisthenics testing, the Stratos 34 restricted our range of motion more than most other packs we tested. While this is fine for hiking, which requires little dynamic movement, it makes biking or scrambling cumbersome. On the other hand, this pack didn't slip a bit during use, which kept the weight squarely on our hips all day.

Weight


This is a heavy backpack. At 51 oz and only 29 L of volume (weight-to-volume ratio of 1.8 oz/L), it's one of the heaviest packs we tested for the volume. We have used and tested packs for multi-week trips that weigh less. The extra material that results in that weight, though, delivers that aforementioned comfort and venting. It is the rigid structure that most contributes to the greater weight. For dedicated day packing, where your loads aren't necessarily large, the weight of the pack itself may not be a big deal. This is a personal choice, but we know that committed day hikers will dig the comfort and durability of the Stratos. Some of the weight, also, is attributed to the organizational and usability features of the Osprey Stratos. You can't have all those organizational pockets without some weight penalty.

An ice axe in the dedicated holder of the Osprey Stratos.
An ice axe in the dedicated holder of the Osprey Stratos.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Versatility


As we've said, the Stratos 34 is a purpose-built hiker's pack. It keeps your water bladder, rain jacket, trekking poles, and first aid kit contained. It has sufficient external attachment points for activities like snowshoeing, but we preferred more traditional and larger compression straps for most winter activities. You probably won't like it for commuting or use as a carry-on for flying due to its bulk. Again, it is the rigid frame that defines this pack, and its performance in this metric. The large profile, even when unloaded, inhibits use outside of day hiking. This is ok. Purpose built equipment isn't meant to be versatile.

The Stratos 34 is one of only a couple packs tested that comes with...
The Stratos 34 is one of only a couple packs tested that comes with a rain cover.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Ease of Use


The plethora of pockets and straps are tailored to exactly the demands of day hiking. There is a pocket for everything. For those of you that like everything in its pocket, this is great. Even the main compartment is divided in two, with a permanent panel separating the lower one-fourth of the pack (although this can be unhooked from the back panel to allow for big items in the main compartment). This lower compartment is nice for stowing wet rain gear or the trunks or swimsuit you carry for that alpine lake dip. The side water bottle compartments hold the largest of hiking water bottles.

The hip belt pockets on the Stratos are very large, but even fully stuffed, they don't get in the way. We like them for carrying sunscreen, snacks, and light gloves or hats. These items moved around a bit in the relatively uncompressible larger, outer zip pocket, which also Velcros closed at its top. This pocket is ideal for storing a shovel for winter hikes, or bulky layers that get in the way in the main compartment. To round out the list of handy features, we loved the front-side pole carry loops on the Stratos 34. They are burly and secure, and can easily hold heavy poles with snow baskets. They changed the way we view poles on day hikes, allowing us to very easily store and deploy our poles to optimize our walking style for the terrain.

Generous waist belt pockets on the Stratos 34.
Generous waist belt pockets on the Stratos 34.
Photo: Jediah Porter

We look for a carefully chosen set of pockets, zippers that don't snag, and main pouches that aren't obscured by straps. Hiking specific features like trekking pole holders and hydration system compatibility round out the list of things that make a dedicated hiking pack useful.

Getting in and out of the main compartment of the Stratos 34 is...
Getting in and out of the main compartment of the Stratos 34 is easy. No straps cross the main zipper.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Durability


Between the solid initial construction and Osprey's warranty and repair policy, the Stratos 34 will last you as long as you want it to. We experienced no sense of premature degradation with this backpack. While we try to put a pack through the ringer in our multi-month test period, a bag like this really won't show any wear for years of normal use.

Each component of the Stratos 34 is designed to last, but it must be noted that there are many things that could fail. The buckles, straps, frame components, zippers, and fabrics are robust, but still prone to failure. More layers and doodads leave more room for failure. Simpler packs, all else equal, might experience fewer durability issues. Compared to top-loaders, panel-loaders tend to fair more poorly in dusty and sandy environments where sand can clog up zippers. However, the big toothed zippers and solid warranty on this pack make this a minor concern.

The waist belt pockets of the Stratos 34 are handy for snacks and a...
The waist belt pockets of the Stratos 34 are handy for snacks and a cell phone. Here, lead test editor Jediah Porter in the Snowy Range.
Photo: Rosie De Lise

In our hose testing, the included rain cover shed rain exactly as designed. We didn't like it as much as rain covers that attach to the hip belt as well as the back of the pack. Without the rain cover, the Stratos still didn't let in much water due to the large flaps over the zippers.

Value


There are a few ways to look at the value of this backpack. For its narrow applications, it could be seen as expensive. Who wants to pay this much for such a specific piece of equipment? Or, you could see the expense as a cost of dedication to an activity like day hiking. The good news is that the performance should meet or exceed expectations, the pack's construction and materials will last for years of even very frequent hiking, and Osprey offers excellent warranty and repair services.

When we measured the volume of the Stratos 34 we found it to be less...
When we measured the volume of the Stratos 34 we found it to be less than advertised, but more than the other packs we tested.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Conclusion


If you came here for an all-around daypack, this isn't the product for you. If you came here because you like to dial in your hiking kit and need a pack for weekend after weekend on all kinds of trails, this is the pack for you. The support and venting serve on hikes long and short, and the volume holds exactly what you need. You can overstuff it, or lighten the load and the suspension system stays with you.

The side mesh pockets of the Stratos 34 are both generous and secure...
The side mesh pockets of the Stratos 34 are both generous and secure for holding the largest of hiking water bottles.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Dan Scott