The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Gregory Deva 60 Review

The Deva is a stable, comfortable pack that provides plenty of room for carrying large, bulky loads.
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Price:  $300 List | $162.95 at Amazon
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Pros:  Stable, sturdy, comfortable, and spacious
Cons:  Heavy, excess straps, expensive
Manufacturer:   Gregory
By Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 2, 2017
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66
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#15 of 15
  • Comfort - 24% 8
  • Weight - 23% 5
  • Suspension - 23% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 7
  • Features - 15% 6

The Skinny

The Gregory Deva shines in its ability to carry large, heavy loads with surprising comfort and stability. This burly backpack is built to endure the elements — with incredibly durable materials and zippers used in its construction. The shoulder straps are wide on this pack, and more suited for an athletic build than a petite frame. The Deva provides excellent ventilation against the back, with an airflow design that opposes the natural arch the back, creating a space for venting. Like the Arc'teryx Bora AR 61, the Deva utilizes a hip stabilizing system that hinges with the body's movement, allowing the shoulder straps and weight distribution to remain steady.

The pack is heavy, but in recent models, Gregory seems to have slimmed it down to a slightly more manageable weight. Similar to the Osprey Ariel and Arc'teryx Bora, the backpack features a removable top lid design that allows for use as a daypack. This is a convenient option when planning for side trips or day hikes from camp while on a multi-day trip in the backcountry.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The new version of the Gregory Deva is similar to the old version we tested, in that this pack has it all. Tons of padding, pivoting hip belt design, and loads of space and storage options provide everything you'll need in your next backpacking pack.

Performance Comparison



Comfort


Overall, the Deva is an incredibly comfortable backpack. With a women's specific pre-curved harness and hip belt, the backpack carries exceptionally well. Even though the shoulder straps are wide, ladies with narrower shoulders didn't seem to have a problem with them. The back and shoulder straps are well padded, more so than the other backpacks in the review. The Osprey Ariel 65 has a similar amount of padding on the shoulder straps, whereas The North Face Terra 55 has minimal shoulder padding. Regarding the Deva's design details as far as the padding and suspension go, this backpack remains comfortable under heavy pack loads.

In the sea of Sierra granite  we found the Deva to work better carrying larger loads rather than smaller ones.
In the sea of Sierra granite, we found the Deva to work better carrying larger loads rather than smaller ones.

Weight


Unfortunately, all the comfortable padding adds lots of extra weight, which is a downside to the excessive comfort provided by the Deva. On the plus side, the newer model is lighter than the previous version we tested, making it comparable to the Osprey Aura 65.

The Gregory Deva felt pretty heavy on our backs  which is a compromise that has to be made with a pack with as much padding and support as this one.
The Gregory Deva felt pretty heavy on our backs, which is a compromise that has to be made with a pack with as much padding and support as this one.

We noticed the weight behind the Deva. With that in mind, it handles a heavy pack load with superb stability, and this makes it worth the weight. This backpack feels too heavy to carry with a lighter load, and we wouldn't recommend it for long distance trips or lightweight gear. Due to the weight, we found the Deva to be highly comfortable on shorter distance backpacking trips.

OGL Measured Volume Bottom Line:
Total Volume = 58 L
Main Bag = 42 L
Pockets = 9 L
Lid = 7 L

Suspension


The new A3 suspension system of the Deva improves its weight distribution and carrying comfort. Both the shoulder straps and hip belt panels pivot independently, allowing for the backpack to remain entirely stable, even when moving over uneven terrain. Similar to the suspension system in the Arc'teryx Bora 61, we think Bora has the best suspension that utilizes the stabilizing waist belt. It operates true to its design and keeps the weight distributed while avoiding sway in the shoulders or hips. Unlike the versatility of our Editors' Choice awarded backpack, the Osprey Aura AG, we do not think the Deva's suspension is ideal for lighter backpacking.

The back panel and the shoulder straps of the Gregory Deva are super padded and comfortable.
The back panel and the shoulder straps of the Gregory Deva are super padded and comfortable.

Ease of Use


The many straps for tightening on the exterior of this backpack compromise its ease of use. Other than that, we found the pack easy to adjust regarding the shoulder straps and waist belt. The superfluous straps are compression straps on the outside of the pack that complicates the design and were unnecessary. While the extra straps allow for attaching gear to the exterior as well as to compress the backpack, the Deva is plenty spacious without having to utilize exterior straps, and the same compression may be achieved with tie-down points. The Mountain Hardwear Ozonic is a great alternative to the Deva as it, too, offers lots of adjustment without the excessive straps.

Access into all of the compartments is easy, and while hiking, the side pockets, which hold water bottles, are easily accessible as well. As a result of a more substantial weight, the Deva is not versed in a diverse range of backpacking trips, nor is it easy to carry if it is not weighted with enough gear. It doesn't carry light loads comfortably.

Features


With five enclosed compartments, the Deva has great organization options. Aside from the main compartment, it has two medium-sized and two small enclosed pockets. One of these pockets houses the pack's rainfly, which is very bulky and takes up the majority of the space inside the pocket. This is a small concern and doesn't take away from the ample storage that the pack offers. The pack is similar regarding the number of pockets to the Osprey Aura AG and the REI Co-Op Traverse, although the pockets seem larger on the Deva. In fact, the entire pack feels larger. Like the Arc'teryx Bora the Deva has capacity beyond its measured liter size.

The lid of the Deva is large enough to store plenty of small items  but can also be compact an fit close to the body of the pack when empty.
The lid of the Deva is large enough to store plenty of small items, but can also be compact an fit close to the body of the pack when empty.

Best Application


The spacious size and variety of organization options make this backpack ideal for short distances, long-term travel, and/or family backpacking trips where many pockets are ideal for separating lots of equipment. For the woman who prefers to pack more, not less, the Deva is your pick.

Value


The Deva is one of the most expensive packs in our review, but recent changes have made it comparable in price to our award-winning packs. At $300, it is a good value for the woman who wants a lot of space and appreciates luxury in comfort and capacity. It offers space and exceptional stability when packed full.

The Gregory Deva taking in the evening light in Little Yosemite Valley.
The Gregory Deva taking in the evening light in Little Yosemite Valley.

Conclusion


Considering the weight and suspension design of the Gregory Deva, shorter distance trips with mid-to heavy-weight pack loads are ideal. With plenty of space to pack everything you could desire on a backpacking trip, the Deva is one of the most luxurious models in our review. If luxury is what you seek and you can endure the weight for shorter distance backpacking, then this contender is beyond compare in both design features and spaciousness.


Jane Jackson