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Sierra Designs LT Strike 2 Review

Sierra Designs LT Strike 2
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Price:  $400 List
Pros:  Looks cool.
Cons:  One of the weakest tents tested, hard to achieve a tight fly pitch, only two mid level guypoints, steep walls catch wind easily, bottom of walls are not waterproof.
Manufacturer:   Sierra Designs
By Chris McNamara and Max Neale  ⋅  Dec 30, 2012
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Our Verdict

The Sierra Designs LT Strike 2 uses a radical, conversation-starting "Eye Pole" design that creates steep walls and a flat roof. This is one of the most extraterrestrial looking tents found in any campground. It has an average space-to-weight ratio and is considerably weaker than the average tent tested. The LT Strike can be difficult to find; if this is the case, see how the LT Strike compares to all tents tested in our Backpacking Tent Review. You may also want to consider the MSR Hubba Hubba NX, which is in the same price category and win our Top Pick Award.


Our Analysis and Test Results

Livability


The LT Strike uses a unique "Eye Pole" design that maximizes headroom with minimal weight. Two sections of the pole connect with plastic hubs to create a large -<>- shape (see photo below) with a large amount of interior space that has steep walls. The 27 sq. ft. interior space can actually be used! A moderate 37" peak height provides enough space to sit up and two 9 sq. ft. vestibules provide plenty of covered area for a pair of shoes and a pack.

Sierra Designs LT Strike 2. The poles only touch the ground in two places and there are only two guy points on the outer tent. It's one of the weakest tents tested.
Sierra Designs LT Strike 2. The poles only touch the ground in two places and there are only two guy points on the outer tent. It's one of the weakest tents tested.

Weather Resistance


The LT Strike 2 is one of the weakest tents tested. The pole design only connects to the ground in two places, which only allows for two mid-level guy points. We do not believe it's suitable for serious three-season storms. Further, the inner tent lacks a critical feature found on almost all other tents: the bottom of the walls are not waterproof and, thus, splashback can soak them and anything inside that touches them. The pole design puts a lot of tension on the two ground level guy points that don't hold poles. It's important to stake these out well. Otherwise the inner and outer tent walls will not be tight. In other words, you must stake all four ground level points out every time. There's no clip to relieve tension from the vestibule zippers.

Weight and Packed Size


The tent weighs 59 oz. or 3 lb. 11 oz. with stakes. This is 27 ounces heavier than the lightest two-person tent tested. It packs reasonably small.

Size comparison for three classes of shelters: Sierra Designs LT Strike 2 (two door self-supporting tent)  Easton Kilo 2 (single door self-supporting tent)  and Mountain Laurel Designs DuoMid (ultralight shelter).
Size comparison for three classes of shelters: Sierra Designs LT Strike 2 (two door self-supporting tent), Easton Kilo 2 (single door self-supporting tent), and Mountain Laurel Designs DuoMid (ultralight shelter).

Adaptability


The LT Strike receives a zero here (the highest score is 3) because it must be pitched in the exact same way every time, which can be a drawback for long distance hikers or anyone forced to camp in sites that don't allow an optimal pitch. ultralight tents offer far more adaptability.

Limitations


The tent is highly limited by it's weak pole design. It looks cool but it's not confidence inspiring. The LT Strike's space-to-weight ratio is exactly the average of the 24 tents we've tested; there's much room for improvement. Better fabrics would help.

Best Application


Camping in protected areas.

Value


High price and moderate-to-low performance. We plot retail prices and our scores for each tent in a Price versus Value Chart.


Chris McNamara and Max Neale