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NEMO Galaxi 2 Review

A heavy but luxurious tent for camping and short backpacking trips.
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Price:  $250 List | $187.46 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 4 resellers
Pros:  Comfortable, footprint included, durable, easy to set up
Cons:  Heavy, large pack size
Manufacturer:   NEMO
By Jessica Haist and Jess McGlothlin  ⋅  Nov 13, 2018
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68
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 20
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Ease of Set-up - 10% 8
  • Weather Resistance - 20% 8
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Weight - 25% 3
  • Packed Size - 10% 6

The Skinny

We reach for the NEMO Galaxi when we need a quality tent for any activity where we want a spacious and durable shelter that we don't have to carry over long distances. It is a comfortable, durable tent at a great price. It has a handful of nice luxury features as well that make it stand apart from the competition. It is a real boat on your back, so if lightweight is your priority, you should check out almost anything else, but for first-time campers or those who like to live in luxury in the outdoors, this one may just be right for you.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

We loved testing out this tent. It offers plenty of space with a few luxury features, like a star-gazing, retractable fly and an included footprint.

Performance Review


The tent toughed it out on a cold fall weekend. It's much more stealth when the leaves are still on the trees.
The tent toughed it out on a cold fall weekend. It's much more stealth when the leaves are still on the trees.

The Galaxi is comfortable, easy to set up, durable, and stands up well to bad weather. It's a heavy, bulky tent, and so scores lower in the weight and packed size metrics.

Spacious on the inside. Noteworthy features include the side and end gear pockets  as well as the vestibules  which jut away from the tent at a lower angle than many other models.
Spacious on the inside. Noteworthy features include the side and end gear pockets, as well as the vestibules, which jut away from the tent at a lower angle than many other models.

Comfort


This tent is an incredibly roomy and comfortable model. It has a pre-bent pole structure, which means that it sets up with vertical walls, maximizing interior space. It has two side doors that are unusually shaped. We think that they are a little on the small side compared to other tents like the REI Half Dome 2 Plus or the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2. They are also opposed from each other, the implication being that sleepers are meant to orient head-to-toe. On the plus side, their shape makes it easy to zip and unzip with one hand.


It has two generous 11 sq. ft. vestibules which offer plenty of space of a pack and footwear (though they extend at a long, low angle, so zipping them can be a little bit of a pain if you're already tucked into your bag). It also has a handful of thoughtful features like overhead light diffuser pockets, fly zipper vents, and a magnetic door tie, which allows you to pull back the door and fasten it with one hand. It also comes with an included footprint, which is a rarity among backpacking tents.

The peak height and lateral headroom make it easy to sit up without bumping into the ceiling.
The peak height and lateral headroom make it easy to sit up without bumping into the ceiling.

The tent doesn't really have privacy panels, but the bathtub floor does extend up a bit further at the head and foot ends. The two side pockets aren't quite as expansive as what the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 offers, but we rarely felt that we needed more storage space than it had.

The two side gear storage pockets can hold a lot of stuff that you might want to keep accessible. It's a little annoying that they are at the foot end though.
The two side gear storage pockets can hold a lot of stuff that you might want to keep accessible. It's a little annoying that they are at the foot end though.

Ease of Set Up


The single hubbed-pole design makes the Galaxi easy to set up.


Because of all of the 'legs' moving around at the same time, it is easier to set up with two people, but one person can do it fairly easily as well. The fly attaches with grommets to the four main corners of the poles, just like the tent body does.

The single pole structure with a central hub makes this tent easy to set up for one person and a breeze for two.
The single pole structure with a central hub makes this tent easy to set up for one person and a breeze for two.

Between the tent, fly and footprint, there are three grommets to try and fit at the corner of each pole. It's a tight fit to get them all on there at the same time.

Weather Resistance


This contender kept us dry in downpours and held strong in high winds. This tent performed well where many fail because the waterproof floor extends fairly high up the sides of the walls, guarding against splashback.

The deep bathtub floor keeps ground moisture and splashback out of the sleeping area.
The deep bathtub floor keeps ground moisture and splashback out of the sleeping area.

There are no separate dedicated vents for condensation, but there are props on each side of the fly that allow you to unzip the vestibule in order to facilitate airflow without opening it up (too much) to the elements.


As noted above, the vestibules extend at a long, low angle, so if the fly is already wet, you can count on getting your arm and top of your head wet too. However, once you are safely tucked inside the fortress, it should keep you dry through the night.

The kickstand on the fly facilitates ventilation while still keeping out light to moderate rain (as long as it's not too windy).
The kickstand on the fly facilitates ventilation while still keeping out light to moderate rain (as long as it's not too windy).

If the forecast is nice, you can always roll back the fly halfway to really get some air circulating while also looking up at the stars.


Durability


This tent is awfully heavy, but in this case, that also comes with increased durability. It has a 68 denier (D) ripstop fly and 75D floor. Also included is a custom-fit footprint for added abrasion resistance to protect the bottom of the tent.

The Galaxi comes with a decent amount of guyline and adjusters  stakes that stay in the ground  a couple of patches  and a pole splint (not pictured).
The Galaxi comes with a decent amount of guyline and adjusters, stakes that stay in the ground, a couple of patches, and a pole splint (not pictured).

As with any PU coated product, we would eventually expect the material to degrade (see our Buying Advice for more info on this). However, with proper care and storage, this tent should last a long time. This tent has some minor faults, but durability isn't one of them.


Weight and Packed Size


The Galaxi really tips the scales. It's a hefty 6 lbs. 1 oz. At this weight, it's certainly not meant for longer backpacking trips, even split between two people.


Its thicker, durable fabrics also take up way more space when they are stuffed in a pack than the much lighter Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 or the NEMO Hornet.


Best Application


This tent is a great option for car camping, paddling, or pitching in the backyard with the kids. Its 6-plus pounds make it a poor choice for toating too far into the backcountry.

Value


At $250, the Galaxi is a great value. We are pleasantly surprised by the price of this tent. Though we think that the REI Half Dome 2 Plus is a slightly better value at $220 because of its even roomier dimensions, it doesn't come with a footprint. The Galaxi has many luxury features that mean the price is right if you're looking for a solid, general use tent.

Conclusion


The Galaxi is the Cadillac of this tent review; it is a big heavy boat with enough useful extras that make the oohs and aahs last beyond the first pitch. We wouldn't want to take it deep into the backcountry, even with two people, but for car camping or paddling adventures, it's hard to top this model.


Jessica Haist and Jess McGlothlin