Hands-on Gear Review

Snow Peak GigaPower 2.0 Review

Snow Peak GigaPower Auto
Price:  $50 List | $49.95 at REI
Pros:  Light weight, easy to use, good at simmering, piezo igniter
Cons:  A bit heavier and bit pricier than the competition
Bottom line:  This stove does everything well.
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Boil Time (1 liter):  5:02 min:sec
Trail Weight:  3.0 oz
Packed Weight:  3.9 oz
Manufacturer:   Snow Peak

Our Verdict

A light and compact canister stove with a great feature set and simmering ability, the Snow Peak Gigapower 2.0 gives the Editors' Choice Award Winning MSR PocketRocket 2 a run for its money. The original Gigapower had been a reliable, albeit slow, performer for years. This upgrade is not only lighter but brings the surprisingly high boil times down to the same realm as the competition. With its piezoelectric ignition and good stability, it's easier to use than other small canister stoves.


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Our Analysis and Test Results

Review by:
Ian McEleney

Last Updated:
Tuesday
July 18, 2017

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Snow Peak has been making the GigaPower Auto for a number of years. The previous version of this unit had features (great packability, low weight, piezoelectric starter) that are slowly becoming standard. The older model, however, was plagued with mediocre fuel efficiency and abysmal boil time. The GigaPower Auto 2.0 has that same great feature set, with much-improved boil time and fuel efficiency.

Performance Comparison


A guided group sits down for a backpacking stove comparison taste test.
A guided group sits down for a backpacking stove comparison taste test.

Fuel Efficiency


Like the other small canister stoves, the GigaPower's fuel efficiency was severely limited by the wind. In the no-wind test, it used less fuel than the Pocket Rocket 2 0.4 oz. Surprisingly for our testers, it also just edged out the MSR Reactor in fuel burned.

Once we set it in front of the fan for the 8- 10 mph test, the fuel efficiency dropped significantly. It burned 1.5 oz of fuel in 30 minutes and did not boil 1 liter of water. Neither did the other two small canister stoves. The Editors' Choice award-winning MSR Pocket Rocket 2 used slightly less fuel in the wind and the Primus Classic Trail used more.

The fan did not blow the GigaPower out  but it did keep it from boiling water.
The fan did not blow the GigaPower out, but it did keep it from boiling water.

Weight


The GigaPower 2.0 is above average in the weight department. It's 0.4 oz heavier than the Pocket Rocket 2 and considerably lighter than the Classic Trail. Even when the lack of a pot is compensated for to compare to an integrated canister stove (see how in our How We Tested Backpacking Stoves article), it's lighter than Jetboil MiniMo. Keep in mind that the GigaPower 2.0 comes with a piezoelectric starter (Snow Peak says this adds 0.3 oz) while the Pocket Rocket 2 does not. It also packs down about as small as the Pocket Rocket 2 and comes with a slightly smaller plastic case.

The GigaPower packs into a 2.5 liter pot with room to spare.
The GigaPower packs into a 2.5 liter pot with room to spare.

Simmering


Simmering was something that this stove does well. Like the Pocket Rocket 2, the valve control is sensitive at the low end and the stove can be turned way down before sputtering out. The Pocket Rocket 2 and Primus Classic are the two highest scorers in the simmering department, earning the only 9 out of 10s.

Boil Time


Boil time is not particularly important to our testers, indeed, one prefers a slightly slower stove because it lets him multitask. The GigaPower 2.0 is slightly slower to boil 1 liter of water than the other small canister stoves, but at 5 minutes and 2 seconds, not that much slower. All the other stoves in the test, except for the Reactor, were even slower.

The GigaPower 2.0 running at full blast.
The GigaPower 2.0 running at full blast.

As with the other small canister stoves, the GigaPower was unable to get water to a rolling boil in the face of an 8 - 10 mph wind. In 30 minutes, it only produced small bubbles on the bottom of the pot. Our testers are not put off by the wind so long as they could place the stove behind some kind of windbreak. Snow Peak sells an aftermarket windscreen for the GigaPower. It offers some wind protection and also helps reflect heat up at the pot.

Ease Of Use


This is another place where the GigaPower does well. It has one of the longest control valve wires in the test, the MSR Windburner is about 2cm longer, so there is no problem reaching under there quickly when the pot is about to boil over. The pot supports are about 7mm shorter than those on the Pocket Rocket 2, but they are more sturdy and there are four. Plus the stove is 2.5 cm shorter so the overall effect is more stability.

The easy-to-use control valve of the Snow Peak GigaPower 2.0.
The easy-to-use control valve of the Snow Peak GigaPower 2.0.

This unit is also equipped with a reliable piezo lighter, and while it's probably a good idea to carry a lighter as a backup, you won't need to locate it to make your morning coffee. Our testers really appreciate the piezo lighters on every stove that has them. We wish they were a standard feature on all stoves. As with all small canister stoves, assembly and use are only slightly more difficult than your stove at home.

Best Applications


We think the best use for this stove is for backpackers who don't mind carrying an extra 0.4 oz (and paying a bit more) for a stove that's easy to use. It's best for folks who won't be above treeline that much and want to eat more than just freeze-dried food from time to time. For hikers who want hot water in a hurry, check out the blazingly fast MSR Reactor or the only-12-seconds-slower Jetboil MiniMo. Headed out on an expedition? We'd recommend the MSR Whisperlite.

Value


At $50 it's not a bad value, especially considering its ease of use and fuel efficiency. The Pocket Rocket 2 costs less and is a little lighter, making it a comparable value.

Conclusion


This is a good stove that gives the Pocket Rocket 2 a run for its money. Are its features and fuel efficiency worth 0.4 oz in your pack and $5 more out of your wallet? Maybe. The GigaPower Auto does everything we expect of a canister stove very well.

Luke preparing a pre-send dinner at the Incredible Hulk with the GigaPower 2.0.
Luke preparing a pre-send dinner at the Incredible Hulk with the GigaPower 2.0.
Ian McEleney

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Most recent review: July 18, 2017
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:  
  • 1
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  • 4
  • 5
 (4.0)
Average Customer Rating:  
 (0.0)
Rating Distribution
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5 star: 0%  (0)
4 star: 100%  (1)
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