≪ Go to our review of Altimeter Watches

Hands-on Gear Review

Suunto Traverse Review

Suunto Traverse
Price:   $469 List | $351.75 at Amazon
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  GPS-enabled, decent accuracy, great graphs, fitness tracker, great display, built-in flashlight mode
Cons:  Very poor battery life, poor wrist band
Bottom line:  The Suunto Traverse is a great option if you’re looking for GPS-enabled functionality and few features. That said, the battery life is terrible.
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
Manufacturer:   Suunto

Our Verdict

The Suunto Traverse is a GPS-enabled altimeter watch that provides great climb and descent metrics, but doesn't truly stand out for one reason or another. It features an altimeter and barometric profile, in addition to several fitness training features. Although these features and the watch are great on their own, there are better value options out there. The Suunto Ambit3 Peak is our Editors' Choice, and contains all the same (and more) features as the Traverse (except a built-in flashlight). It has better battery life and accuracy with a better quality construct. In addition, it is more comfortable and versatile. That said, this contender is a great watch for short adventures as the battery only last eight hours with GPS, and only two weeks without GPS. Even though we liked this watch on its own as an altimeter contender, we'd recommend checking out the Suunto Ambit3 Peak instead. For an additional $50, you get a much better watch with much higher value.


RELATED REVIEW: The Best Altimeter Watches Review


Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Amber King
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Saturday
November 12, 2016

Share:
The Traverse is a GPS-enable altimeter watch that can also track routes, log data, and monitor fitness. Take it with you on short adventures.

Performance Comparison


A look at the Suunto Traverse in GPS mode. It shows many great metrics: ascent rate  total distance  time  and more!
A look at the Suunto Traverse in GPS mode. It shows many great metrics: ascent rate, total distance, time, and more!

Features


This contender features many great altitude and barometric features. In addition to the traditional features of an altimeter watch (altimeter, barometer, compass, timekeeper, temperature), it also features many GPS-enabled options. You can track fitness patterns, navigate to selected points, create waypoints and points of interest, and much more. We liked the plethora of features with the Traverse. However, the Suunto Ambit3 Peak features all of these options and more. So if you're in the market for a watch that has fewer features, this may be the option for you. If features are what you're looking for, you should check out the Garmin Fenix 5, our Top Pick for Features.

Altimeter & Barometer
In order to ensure accurate altimeter readers, make sure to calibrate your watch as often as possible, especially in storms or changing weather.

Similar to the other Suunto watches in this review, the altimeter and barometer are tied together. There are three alti-baro profiles you can choose from that include automatic, altimeter, and barometer. If the automatic profile is selected, it can flip between the barometer and altimeter profile based on your motion. If you're moving uphill or down, it will go to altimeter. If you aren't moving, it will switch to the barometric pressure graph. The FusedAlti is a handy dandy feature that calibrates using both sea pressure and GPS function. In addition, the barometric graph plots points to show either a rise or fall in barometric pressure. This can help determine weather patterns and show whether or not a storm is moving in and out of the area.

Here we see the time and altitude displayed while the watch is logging data. Below you can see the battery life. This watch was completely charged at 8 am  and shows quite a loss of battery life on this short trip.
Here we see the time and altitude displayed while the watch is logging data. Below you can see the battery life. This watch was completely charged at 8 am, and shows quite a loss of battery life on this short trip.


The profiles generated for the altimeter and barometer are the same as the Suunto Ambit3 Peak. Both of these graphs are much better than the Suunto Core Alu and the Casio PRW-6000Y. However, they don't compare to the Garmin Fenix 5, which integrates color and a moving data point on the graph. In addition, this watch comes with a storm alert that will go off when there is a drop of 2 hPa (0.59 inHg) over three hours. In our experience the alarm does work, but it's not always accurate at predicting whether or not there is, in fact, a storm on the way.

A look at the altimeter graph produced during one of the logs.
A look at the altimeter graph produced during one of the logs.

Another feature we really liked was the data log and the trip summary. It shows total ascent and descent, and also shows the speed at which you are ascending or descending if the GPS is turned on. When looking back at past logged events, it doesn't contain nearly the amount of data that you'd find with the Suunto Ambit3 Peak. However, we did like that it showed a summary profile of the altitude gain and loss. This is actually a feature that the Suunto Ambit3 Peak did not have.

Compass
The digital compass is tilt-compensated and provides you with a cardinal direction and reference to true north. Like other watches tested, you can manually calibrate the declination, and it also features a nifty bearing lock. All of the features are similar to other GPS watches and the Suunto Core.

The digital compass provides a directional reading in degrees.
The digital compass provides a directional reading in degrees.

Timekeeper
Like all altimeter watches, the Traverse also features classic timekeeping functions. It has a countdown timer, stopwatch, one daily alarm, GPS time, and daylight savings time options. If you're in the market for a watch that has more alarms, check out the Casio options.

Navigation and GPS
Of all the GPS watches tested, this has the fewest number of features. Though this watch is engineered to be a fitness tracker, it has some other handy navigational features as well — not as many as either the Suunto Ambit3 Peak or the Garmin Fenix 5, but enough to keep you up to date on fitness tracking. In addition, like other GPS watches, it features both GPS and GLONASS networks for a better signal and accuracy.

A  basic graph is generated showing where you've been and where you're going.
A basic graph is generated showing where you've been and where you're going.

Check out this list of navigational features found on the Traverse:
  • Find back features help guide you back to your starting point where the first GPS fix was established.
  • Point of Interest (POI) icons that you can choose with your log. You can navigate back to these POIs, and they can be used while stationary or moving.
  • Check your coordinates.
  • Create routes with a route planner in the Suunto Movescount app and navigate those routes.
  • Logbook: shows the type of activity, distances, speed, and more.
  • Change map orientation.
  • A real-time navigational map is created to show your basic location.
  • Change GPS accuracy options to save battery life or get a more precise track: 1 sec (high), 5 sec (good), 60 sec (okay), none

In addition, this watch has many activity monitoring functions such as daily steps, calories burned (that is reset at midnight), 30-day step history (and yearly trends), and specific activity profiles (i.e. hiking, running, swimming, biking, etc.).

Use Suunto Movescount to optimize functionality with this watch. This app will upload all data and actually create videos of your adventures.

Other Cool Features
In addition to these fitness features, this watch also has Smart Notifications. Unfortunately, this watch doesn't have any additional accessories like a heart rate monitor or foot pod that is specific to its design like the Suunto Ambit3 Peak and the Garmin Fenix 5.

Battery Life


To be blunt, the battery life in the Traverse really sucks compared to the rest of the GPS watches tested. Using regular settings (a GPS point every 60 sec) we found that the battery life only lasts about eight hours. In comparison, the Suunto Ambit3 Peak and the Garmin Fenix 5 lasts almost twice as long. Additionally, even when not using the GPS, the watch is said to last just two weeks. Unfortunately this limits to the use of this watch drastically and as a result, it earned one of our lowest scores for battery life. The GPS watch that did the best in this metric was the Garmin Fenix 5, while the best non-GPS watch was the solar-powered Casio PRW-6000Y. It only needs to spend six minutes in the sun to stay charged daily.

A comparison of both altitude  and battery life. Both watches started fully charged. The Suunto Traverse shows almost 50 percent less battery life than the Suunto Ambit3 Peak on this hike.
A comparison of both altitude, and battery life. Both watches started fully charged. The Suunto Traverse shows almost 50 percent less battery life than the Suunto Ambit3 Peak on this hike.

Ease of Use


Of all the watches tested, this was rated as the second easiest to figure out. The menu and interface is the same as the Suunto Ambit3 Peak, but because it has fewer features. We still thought the Garmin Fenix provided a more logical and user-friendly interface that required less button pushing.

The buttons on the right side of the watch are well marked.
The buttons on the right side of the watch are well marked.

In addition, we found that the buttons weren't as easy to press as on the other GPS watches tested because they are flat on the ends instead of convex like the Suunto Ambit3 Peak and the Suunto Core Alu. That said, it was still easy to use the buttons with a pair of gloves.

The buttons on the other side of the watch are also easy to use and well marked.
The buttons on the other side of the watch are also easy to use and well marked.

Altimeter Accuracy


Compared to the other GPS watches tested, this was the second best for altimeter accuracy. Overall, it was the third, with the Suunto Ambit3 Peak second, and the Suunto Core Alu being first. We liked the FusedAlti function that provided relatively accurate readings. In our altimeter accuracy tests (where we hiked over 10,000 vertical feet), we learned that accuracy varied day to day. The Core provided the most reliable readings and was consistently more precise. The Ambit3 Peak also provided a similar level but was off by a few hundred feet more often than not. The Traverse also was fairly accurate, being off only by a 50 to 500 feet with regular calibrations. That said, we still recommend this watch as the altimeter is quite accurate and will help you get where you're going. Just make sure to calibrate it regularly for the best accuracy.

Display Quality


The large mineral glass display is easy to see and features large fonts in the interface. The color display can be inverted and the contrast can be adjusted, which is great for viewing during both day and night. The backlight has three features for night-time use: normal, night, and toggle. In addition, this was the only watch to feature a flashlight mode that kept the display on at its maximum brightness until you turned it off. We liked this when we needed to get something out of our pack and the headlamp wasn't at hand. Overall, we're impressed with the display quality. It is very similar to the Suunto Ambit3 Peak.

This is the only watch to feature a 'flashlight' mode.

Both watches have similar displays. The top shows the Ambit3 Peak while the bottom shows the Suunto Traverse.
Both watches have similar displays. The top shows the Ambit3 Peak while the bottom shows the Suunto Traverse.

Comfort and Fit


Even though this watch features a slim watch face and silicon watch band design that fits nicely around the wrist and over and under clothing, we did not like wearing it when it was hot outside. Unlike all the other bands tested, this one only features watch holes on one side of the band.

The silicon band is like many of the other bands tested and provides a nice tight fit around the wrist.
The silicon band is like many of the other bands tested and provides a nice tight fit around the wrist.

While hiking in the heat with the watch against our skin, we learned that the lack of holes made our wrist sweaty and itchy. In addition, the band does not have the ergonomic insert like the Suunto Ambit3 Peak or the Suunto Core Alu. Instead if feels floppy. However, the weight is light and aside from wearing it when it's hot outside, it's still nicer on the skin than the Casio SGW300HB.

Unlike other bands  it doesn't have many breathable holes on one side  making it sticky. It also doesn't have the ergonomic plastic insert featured in the Suunto Ambit3 Peak for added comfort.
Unlike other bands, it doesn't have many breathable holes on one side, making it sticky. It also doesn't have the ergonomic plastic insert featured in the Suunto Ambit3 Peak for added comfort.

Best Application


Given the short battery life of the watch, it's best used for daily or short adventures. Take it with you on day hikes or week-long backpacking trips. Avoid it for anything longer than two weeks if you don't have access to a USB charger. Additionally, it's a great fitness training tool with a plethora of extra features.

Running around on the Red Mountain Pass at 12 000 feet is a great place for the Suunto Traverse. Day hikes and short adventures are where it performs best.
Running around on the Red Mountain Pass at 12,000 feet is a great place for the Suunto Traverse. Day hikes and short adventures are where it performs best.

Value


At a price of $349, this is just $50 cheaper than the retail value of the Suunto Ambit3 Peak. In general, this is a decent value, especially since you can find it on sale at a variety of dealers. However, we'd recommend that you spend the extra $50 to get the Suunto Ambit3 Peak. It has all the same features of the Traverse (except the flashlight), with a much longer battery life, and a much higher value. If you're in the market for something even less expensive, check out the Suunto Core ($350 without the aluminum finish) or the Casio SGW300HB for just $65.

Conclusion


The Suunto Traverse is a GPS fitness trainer with a built-in altimeter and barometer. It has all the basic features of an altimeter watch, but the battery life is quite poor. If you're looking for a GPS watch, we'd recommend looking instead at the Suunto Ambit3 Peak that has all the same features, better battery life, and comfort, for just $50 more.
Amber King

  • Share this article:
You Might Also Like

Where to Buy?


Thinking about buying some gear we've reviewed? Help OutdoorGearLab out if you do. Just click on any of the above seller links and if you make any purchase, the seller will contribute a portion of the sale to help support this site. It won't cost you anything extra, and it's a simple way to help us fund our gear reviews. Thanks!

*Most retailers free shipping offers apply only to lower 48 US states using ground/economy shipping. See retailer's website for details.


OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: September 17, 2017
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:     (0.0)

0% of 1 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
1 Total Ratings
5 star: 0%  (0)
4 star: 0%  (0)
3 star: 100%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)
Sort 1 member reviews by: Most Recent | Most Helpful
Write a Review on this Gear

Sep 17, 2017 - 06:58am
 
Fer · Climber · Bristol
Not fit for purpose I would say.

I bought Suunto because I thought it was the best brand for mountaineering but I found it terrible hard to use and with lack of a couple of features for this purpose.

The first big failure of the Suunto Traverse is its complexity. When you start you don't have many features on screen, you need to enable them. Navigate through lots of non user friendly menues and you will find what you want after a while.

The second big failure you will find it when you go out and start using it. You try to record your first activity and it seems that you need a profile for it. How to create a profile? With your smartphone. Not ideal as lost of hardcore mountaineers do not have an smartphone but not big deal either as most of us have smartphones nowadays. Then you try to configure it at home. Cumbersome but you get the job done. Then you are up in a mountain and you realise your configuration is not ideal. You come back to the refuge and you try to configure it. That it says what?!? That you need internet in your phone to configure your watch!!! It sounds like a joke but it is note. I am not sure how Suunto thought it was a good idea but I felt like selling it straight away to the hut staff after that.

"It is Suunto, it has to be good" I told myself, so I kept it. I went up and down and I recorded some routes. The videos that you create afterwards with the app are amazing btw.
Very quickly I search for my phone to look for the chronometer to not relax in my breaks more than 5 minutes. Where is the chronometer? There is none… What!?!? Yes, as you read it, when you are recording a route there is no chronometer. You may mean that there is not advance chronometer as "count down", or "repeat", or stuff like that? No, there is absolutely no chronometer, only the time of recording, not partial times, not count down, nothing more than the time since you left the hut and the current time. So you need to choose between recording a route or use a chronometer to measure resting times, time between resting, time for navigation, time to key points… any kind of time you want to measure!

The watch is target to "explorers" but it is pretty useless for navigation when you quite often need to measure the time that you take between to milestones. Ironic.

So my workaround at the moment is to carry a classic old 10 quid Casio next to my expensive Suunto to have a chronometer. Not ideal.
Apart from these couple of massive pitfalls that is making me selling it and probably never buying Suunto again, the phone is a good phone, robust, solid, lots of functions, accurate, great videos when you plug it to the app, it is a brilliant watch.

It is like an expensive fancy car that all controls are connected to Internet. Brilliant while you are in the city but useless when you are actually exploring.
  • "Car, can you tell me the temperature of the engine?"
  • "No, sorry, the WiFi is not available".
  • "Car, can you play some music?"
  • -"No, sorry, you have your GPS on, please turn it off to access to the radio…"
WTH!?
That is what actually happens with this watch, two big failures that renders it useless for me.

Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this product to a friend.
Help other readers find the most helpful reviews
Was this review helpful to you? 
Yes
 
No


Have you used this product?
Don't hold back. Share your viewpoint by posting a review with your thoughts...

Write a Review on this Gear
 
Where's the Best Price?
Seller Price
Amazon $351.75  -  25% off!
Backcountry $469.00
REI $469.00
Compare prices at 3 sellers >

*You help support OutdoorGearLab's product testing and reviews by purchasing from our retail partners.


Follow Us


Unbiased.