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Continental Trail King ProTection APEX 2.6 Review

A decent tire that is best suited for light-mid duty trail riding on hardpack and tame terrain.
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Price:  $75 List
Pros:  Relatively well-rounded, fast-rolling, light
Cons:  Works best on tame trails, a little expensive
Manufacturer:   Continental
By Pat Donahue ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Sep 18, 2019
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64
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#17 of 18
  • Cornering - 25% 6
  • Pedaling Traction - 20% 6
  • Braking Traction - 20% 5
  • Rolling Resistance - 15% 8
  • Longevity - 15% 7
  • Installation - 5% 9

Our Verdict

The Continental Trail King ProTection Apex is a serviceable, easy-riding, tire that works best on hardpack or loam. This tire can play as a front or a rear tire, although we recommend running it in the rear if you encounter loose conditions frequently. The Trail King works well but simply can't hold up against the top contenders in any of the performance metrics. This is not to say it is a bad tire. In fact, we think it fared surprisingly well on the trail and it could be a viable option for the right rider in the right conditions. For $75, a lot of folks may favor some of the more tried and true tire options.

If the ProTection Apex part of the name might be a little confusing for those unfamiliar with Continental nomenclature. The Apex is a design feature that enhances sidewall stiffness. ProTection is an insert in the construction that provides cut-resistance and toughness to the casing.


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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Relatively well-rounded, fast-rolling, lightEXO sidewall protection, excellent cornering grip, good on front and rear, dual compound increases longevityExcellent cornering, unbeatable traction, durable supportive sidewallsExcellent cornering, reasonable weight for size, good braking traction, durableVersatile, affordable, great all-around use, intermediate tread height, fast rolling
Cons Works best on tame trails, a little expensiveNot awesome on hardpack, high rolling resistance, moderately expensive, requires good techniqueVery heavy, expensiveHigher rolling resistance, expensive-ishNot the best braking traction
Bottom Line A decent tire that is best suited for light-mid duty trail riding on hardpack and tame terrain.The Minion DHF is one of the most popular tires ever, and for good reason.Maxxis' new Assegai is a big and burly DH tire that inspires confidence with outstanding traction.The DHR II is an aggressive rear trail tire that is worthy of the Maxxis Minion name.The Aggressor is an excellent do-it-all rear tire for any kind of riding.
Rating Categories Trail King ProTection APEX 2.6 Maxxis Minion DHF 3C/EXO Maxxis Assegai Maxxis Minion DHR II Maxxis Aggressor 2.3 EXO
Cornering (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
8
Pedaling Traction (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
Braking Traction (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
Rolling Resistance (15%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
0
6
10
0
8
Longevity (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
Installation (5%)
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
Specs Trail King... Maxxis Minion DHF... Maxxis Assegai Maxxis Minion DHR II Maxxis Aggressor...
Size tested 27.5" x 2.6" 27.5" x 2.3" 27.5" x 2.5" 27.5" x 2.4" 27.5" x 2.3"
Weight as tested 1001g 870g 1303g 917g 885g
Front, Rear, or Both Both Front, Both Both Rear Rear
Casing Tested Protection Apex EXO EXO EXO EXO
Compound Tested Black Chili Maxx Terra 3C MaxxGrip 3C Maxx Terra Dual
Bead Folding Foldable Foldable Foldable Foldable
Tread Count (TPI) 180 60 60 60 60

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Trail King racked up respectable scores in most categories. Rolling resistance and ease of installation were notable highlights. Pedaling and braking traction were both pleasant surprises. Cornering is certainly not a strength of this tire. While this tire is dramatically improved from previous iterations, it is still hard to recommend it over some of the better options in our test. Still, for the right rider in the right conditions, it could work well.

Performance Comparison



The Trail King is a serviceable front tire for less aggressive riders in dry locations.
The Trail King is a serviceable front tire for less aggressive riders in dry locations.

Cornering


Cornering abilities were better than expected with the Trail King. Given its somewhat low profile appearance, we had modest expectations. The shoulder knobs are visibly smaller compared to the meaty and taller lugs on some of our favorite tires. The cornering tread features tightly packed knobs in groups of five with gaps in between.

When you lean this tire on edge, the transition is quite smooth and relatively confidence-inspiring. No, this isn't some super aggressive and mean front tire with which you can simply thrash corners in all kinds of conditions. That said, the performance was solid and predictable. This tire can stand up to some aggressive riding and high-speed corners, but to be clear, this isn't a Minion DHF. It doesn't have an edgy feel and is a little vague as to whether or not you are on the edge with this tire. It is a little less defined feeling than tires with more squared-off shoulder knobs. The Trail King held up surprisingly well in both rock and hardpack settings. There is one section of trail on our test loop that stays damp and slimy all year. We made sure to spend time thrashing this tire in these conditions and the Trail King started to falter quite quickly when things got slippery.

The extra volume in this 2.6-inch tire is enormously beneficial. The ability to run a lower pressure allows the tire to conform to the trail surface. We ran this tire at approximately 21 PSI in the front and 23 PSI in the rear. We found this to be the sweet spot for cornering traction. We experimented with dropping the tire pressure a little bit lower into the high teens and felt that the sidewalls didn't have quite the support to handle pressures that low. The Black Chili rubber compound feels reasonably tacky.

The side knobs are medium height with some pretty substantial gaps between the pairs. Coupled with the rounded profile of the tire we found decent cornering traction in most conditions.
The side knobs are medium height with some pretty substantial gaps between the pairs. Coupled with the rounded profile of the tire we found decent cornering traction in most conditions.

Pedal Traction


The Trail King delivers decent pedal traction. We found this to be a fast-rolling tire on the front and the rear. Often times, the fast-rolling tires tend to have less pedal traction since there is presumably a less aggressive center tread on the tire. The Trail King once again delivered better-than-expected performance.

When zipping up moderate terrain, this tire handles itself just fine. It feels efficient and there isn't much in the way of drag. Step on the gas and the tire engages quickly.

On steeper pitches, we were pleasantly surprised with how well the Trail King hooked up as a rear tire. When you are punching up slow, steep, and loose pitches under heavy load, it maintained traction for longer than we expected. We think the quality Black Chilli compound is a contributing factor but we also think the center tread simply works well. In addition, the lower tire pressures are helpful too. We found trying to scoot up damp, wet, or muddy surfaces required much more precision. This tire simply wasn't designed for the wet.

To be clear, there are better options if pedaling traction is a key concern. A tire like the Maxxis Minion DHR II has a much stronger bite in all conditions. That said, for how fast-rolling the Trail King is, it performed quite well.

The Trail King has siped lugs that deliver decent braking bite.
The Trail King has siped lugs that deliver decent braking bite.

Braking Traction


Braking traction was fine on the Trail King. When mounted on the rear, we did our best to find steep pitches of everything from loam, rock, loose, and hardpack. Again, this tire braked better than we thought it would. Looking at the relatively low profile knobs, we were impressed by the bite it provided.

The Trail King was most effective in shutting down speed on hardpack, rock, and loam. This isn't the sharpest braking tire, but for how fast it rolls, we were pleasantly surprised. Wet roots and rocks were not so pleasant. Under braking forces, this tire quickly went wayward in wet conditions. Deliberate, smart, and controlled braking goes a long way to ensure a positive outcome on slimy surfaces. Looser, sandy, and gravely surfaces were a bit of a puzzle too, but the Trail King handled this situation well-enough.

This tire delivers impressive rolling speed.
This tire delivers impressive rolling speed.

Rolling Resistance


The Trail King is a pretty fast-rolling tire. This isn't a semi-slick or a rear-specific tire designed primarily for rolling speed. But as a versatile tire that can easily be run front or rear, we were very impressed with how it carried speed.

When cruising along fire roads or hardpack, the rolling speed was pretty impressive. The Trail King is noticeably more efficient than some of the more aggressive options in our test. This is hugely beneficial when railing through berms and smooth sections of trail. Less energy and more speed…great. The excellent rolling resistance is a nice attribute, but it can be easily over-valued. We think the lack of traction in tough conditions likely outweighs the rolling speed for aggressive riders. The Trail King is still a great option for the rider who knows he/she doesn't want to ride gnar, slop, or chop frequently.

Longevity


Throughout testing, we observed no significant signs of wear.

While we didn't put huge mileage on each set of tires, some definitely start to show wear early. We have little concerns about the durability and longevity of the Trail Kings especially with the ProTection Apex casing.

The Trail King snapped on the rim remarkably easily.
The Trail King snapped on the rim remarkably easily.

Installation


The Trail King snapped onto our 30mm test rim very, very easily. We used a floor pump with a tubeless booster chamber and the tire seated in one shot.

The tubeless floor pumps are great but they often take some supplemental pumping to get a bead to fully seat. The Trail King is one of the few tires that needed no extra encouragement, it went on in one shot at about 35 PSI. This is significant. We didn't try, but we expect one may be able to set this tire up with a normal floor pump.

Best Applications


Although the Trail King performed surprisingly well in most categories, it was never a top-performer in any. That is not to say it isn't a good tire. We think the light-mid-duty trail rider who rides mostly green and blue terrain may really like this tire.

Aggressive riders who want to rail corners as hard as possible or feed it down nasty terrain should look elsewhere. This tire simply wasn't designed for the enduro application. We would be super interested in trying the Der Baron and/or Der Kaiser, the most aggressive tires in Continental's lineup.

Value


At $75, the Trail King ProTection Apex is an okay value. The on-trail performance was rock-solid but the price tag is a touch high for most people to stray from the comparably priced tried and true tires. Tires are an investment and a risky one at that. Folks who are looking to try something new may be a little gun shy at this price.

Considering the low profile tread and rounded profile of the Trail King we were pleasantly surprised by its performance but we still prefer other options for everyday trail riding.
Considering the low profile tread and rounded profile of the Trail King we were pleasantly surprised by its performance but we still prefer other options for everyday trail riding.

Conclusion


The Continental Trail King ProTection Apex is a noble performer that caught us by surprise. If you are familiar with previous iterations of this tire, you will be pleasantly surprised by the new version. Is this some thrashing aggressive tire? No. Instead, the Trail King is a surprisingly well-rounded tire that delivers solid performance in most metrics. It can be run on the front or the rear wheel and works well in a surprisingly diverse amount of situations save for the slick ones.

Other Versions


The Trail King is available in a few other versions.

In addition to the 27.5 x 2.6-inch version we tested, it is also available in 2.2" and 2.4" widths in both 27.5" and 29" wheel sizes.


Pat Donahue