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CrankBrothers Mallet Boa Review

A versatile all-mountain shoe that strikes a good balance between walkability, power transfer, comfort, and performance
CrankBrothers Mallet Boa
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $200 List | $151.99 at Amazon
Pros:  Comfortable and secure fit, casual style, great off the bike, robust construction, versatile
Cons:  average power transfer, long fit
Manufacturer:   Crankbrothers
By Zach Wick ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 5, 2021
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83
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 18
  • Power Transfer - 20% 7
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Traction Walkability - 25% 9
  • Weight - 15% 7
  • Durability - 15% 9

Our Verdict

Riders looking for a well-balanced all-mountain shoe that will perform on both the climbs and the descents, stand up to the wear and tear of frequent use, and look good while doing it will find everything they need in the Mallet Boa. These versatile shoes quickly became one of our favorites in testing, and we named them our Top Pick for Versatile All-Mountain Shoes. They aren't the top shoes we tested in any single category, but they perform remarkably well in a wide variety of riding conditions with a stiff-but-walkable sole, a quick, easy, and secure closure system, and a few clever features to make life safer and more comfortable out on the trail. They don't come particularly cheap, but riders looking for a single pair of do-it-all mountain biking shoes should look no further.

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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Comfortable and secure fit, casual style, great off the bike, robust construction, versatileStealth rubber soles, excellent power transfer, significantly lighter than previous version, great toe and heel protectionLightweight, reasonable price, casual style, great blend of pedaling stiffness and walkabilityLightweight, reasonable price, good power transfer, comfortableInexpensive, comfortable, great off the bike
Cons average power transfer, long fitNo medial ankle protection, short break-in periodRoomy fit in the forefoot, not the best lateral stabilityMinimal foot protection, not great for walking, smaller cleat adjustment rangeMinimal protection, limited cleat adjustment, below average power transfer
Bottom Line A versatile all-mountain shoe that strikes a good balance between walkability, power transfer, comfort, and performanceAwesome power transfer, foot protection, and off the bike traction with a mid-pack weight that expands this gravity shoe's appeal to trail ridersAn affordable, lightweight, casual-looking trail riding shoe with good power transfer and off the bike walkabilityA quality shoe that offers high-end performance at a reasonable priceA well-rounded, budget-friendly option that's just as comfortable off the bike as it is on
Rating Categories CrankBrothers Malle... Five Ten Hellcat Pro Specialized 2FO Roo... Scott MTB Team Boa Giro Gauge
Power Transfer (20%)
7.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
Comfort (25%)
9.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
8.0
Traction Walkability (25%)
9.0
8.0
9.0
6.0
10.0
Weight (15%)
7.0
7.0
10.0
10.0
7.0
Durability (15%)
9.0
10.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
Specs CrankBrothers Malle... Five Ten Hellcat Pro Specialized 2FO Roo... Scott MTB Team Boa Giro Gauge
Closure Boa dial, plus Velcro strap Laces plus wide velcro strap Laces Boa iP-1 dial, plus velcro strap Laces
Measured Weight (per shoe) 454 grams 452 grams 375 grams 359 grams 452 grams
Size Tested 11 10 (44) 43.5 44 45
Width Options Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
Upper Material Synthetic Synthetic with DWR Synthetic Leather and Textile Synthetic Polyurethane, 3D Airmesh Synchwire on-piece composite
Footbed Not specified Five Ten padded foam Specialized Body Geometry ErgoLogic Die-cut EVA
Sole EVA midsole 3/4 length Dual-density TPU shank/Compression-molded EVA Stiff Lollipop nylon composite plate Nylon/Glass Fiber Composite Injected nylon shank
Outsole Match MC1 Stealth Marathon SlipNot FG StickiRubber Rubber outsole

Our Analysis and Test Results

Crankbrothers markets the Mallet Boa as a downhill/enduro shoe, but throughout our testing process, we learned that we liked these kicks for a lot more than just our gravity rides. The Boa and velcro strap closure system make these shoes super quick to put on for an after-work trail or cross-country ride. The sole is just stiff enough to provide solid pedaling performance while the breathable-but-protective upper keeps your feet cool and safe from rock strikes. They come with Crankbrothers cleats pre-installed, but they'll work with any kind of clip-in mountain bike pedal. We tested ours with SPD cleats and loved them.

Performance Comparison


These stylish kicks handled everything that we threw at them.
These stylish kicks handled everything that we threw at them.
Photo: Zach Wick

Power Transfer


The Mallet Boa is by no means a slouch when it comes time to lay down the power, but sole stiffness is arguably this shoe's weakest point. Like any good enduro or downhill shoe, the Mallet packs some considerable padding and cushion in both the sole and the upper, and when you really stand on the pedals that cushion can feel like it's sucking up a little bit of your power before it has a chance to get to the pedals. Additionally, we found that the forward half of the sole is super stiff, while the rear half is a bit flexy. This definitely contributes to walkability and comfort while descending, but it also led to a slight feeling of the rear half of the shoe folding over the pedal in high-torque situations. For normal pedaling, we didn't have any issues with the sole's stiffness. It was only on short, sharp pitches where you really have to stand on the pedals that we felt a bit of flex.


Crankbrothers has dubbed the Mallet Boa's stiff cleat mounting area the Matchbox. It's one of the wider cleat boxes among shoes we tested, which helps with mud clearance and allows ample space to adjust your stance width by moving the cleats to the left and right. The Matchbox also allows a huge range of fore and aft cleat adjustability. Gravity-oriented riders will likely want to slam the cleats all the way back into the red Race Zone while riders who are looking to balance pedaling with descending will want to opt for a more neutral position. We found that the further rearward we had our cleats mounted, the more we could feel the back half of the shoe flexing in high-torque pedaling scenarios.

We tested our pair of Mallet Boas with a set of XT trail pedals, and we found that the two played nicely together. The wide cleat box made clipping in and out quick and easy, and we found that the sole interfaced nicely with the pedal's platform to provide a little bit of extra lateral stability.

The Mallet Boa's power transfer is roughly comparable to other shoes in their category, and we aren't overly concerned that they aren't the stiffest gravity shoes on the market. During testing we took our test pair out on plenty of long XC rides packed with climbing and we never experienced foot fatigue or discomfort from too much sole flex. If you're looking to maximize your pedaling performance and set PRs on the climbs these might not be the shoes for you, but otherwise, they do just fine. We liked them most for their versatility and comfort, as an over-stiff sole can easily hinder performance in other areas.

The ankle cup and tongue are heavily padded, and the heel has grippy...
The ankle cup and tongue are heavily padded, and the heel has grippy dots that help hold your foot in place.
Photo: Zach Wick

Comfort


When our lead tester first put on the Mallet Boa's he had serious concerns about how they would perform on the trail because they were almost too comfortable. When you're used to stiff-soled, firm-uppered performance shoes that can feel like boards strapped to your feet, a comfortable all-mountain shoe can take a bit of getting used to. When we finally got these shoes out on the trails our concerns about performance disappeared, but the comfort stuck around.


The Mallet Boa's construction and fit both play a large role in its comfort. It has a similar build to a skate shoe, with heavy padding around the ankle, tongue, and heel. The upper is firm but pliable enough to conform to the shape of your foot, and a mesh window on either side of the foot helps keep things relatively cool. The combination of the Boa closure and the velcro strap makes for a secure fit that's easy to tweak. Crankbrothers also included some grippy rubber dots in the heel padding that hold on to your sock and help to keep your heel locked in. The fit is fairly neutral and should suit most foot widths without issue. Our only gripe is that the Mallet seems to run slightly longer than most shoes of the same size. We had a little bit of extra space in the toe box, but it didn't pose any issues. If your feet tend to sit between sizes it might make sense to size down for these shoes.

These shoes really shine when things get rough out on the trails. The extra padding and the mid-stiffness sole help to mute some of the harshest trail feedback and keep your calf muscles from fatiguing. Initially, we worried that the extra padding in the tongue made the fit feel vague and removed too much trail feedback, but a few extra clicks of tension on the Boa helped to lock our feet in and the problem disappeared. This model was one of our favorite clipless shoes when it came time to point it downhill.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Traction and Walkability


Any good all-mountain shoe should perform both on and off the bike. Almost every mountain bike ride inevitably includes some hiking—either to traverse an unrideable obstacle or to session a particularly fun section of trail. We certainly spent some time hiking in the Mallet Boa and they performed as well as we could have asked for. The sole's stiff pedaling platform and flexible rear half allow for a remarkably natural gait. They're not exactly hiking shoes, but they're at least as good as your average sneaker. On steep uphills, the soles don't cause calf fatigue, and the cleats are recessed enough in the cleat box that they only contact the ground heavily on uneven terrain.


The Mallet Boa outsole doesn't have the largest or most aggressive lugs, but it provides a surprising amount of traction. We tested these shoes on some very steep terrain in both wet and dusty conditions and they held their own. The designers at Crankbrothers cleverly angled the tread at the toe and heel to help aid traction when walking up and down steep hills, and it seems to work well. It was only in the greasiest conditions that we ever felt a lack of traction. We wouldn't necessarily want to take these shoes out on our next backpacking trip, but for a quick run back up the trail to session a jump they do the job admirably.

The Boa closure helps keep the weight down.
The Boa closure helps keep the weight down.
Photo: Zach Wick

Weight


Our size eleven test shoes tipped the scales at a very-competitive 454-grams per shoe without cleats installed. The lightest cross-country shoes we tested came in right around 380 grams, so for a protective gravity-oriented model, the Mallet Boa are reasonably light. When compared to shoes geared towards a similar purpose they're on the lighter end of the spectrum, which makes these very appealing for far more than just downhill and enduro riding.


Despite some harsh conditions these shoes held up well during our...
Despite some harsh conditions these shoes held up well during our test.
Photo: Zach Wick

Durability


Despite their relatively low weight, the Mallet Boa are heavy-duty shoes that are built to last. We put some considerable miles on our test pair over the course of a month, and they came out the other side remarkably well despite some muddy days and a couple of close encounters with trailside rocks.


Crankbrothers doesn't provide a ton of info on the materials that make up the Mallet Boa, but we can say with confidence that they are high-quality. The upper is abrasion-resistant and sleek with no areas that can easily snag on trailside obstacles. The toe box is reinforced by a thick rubber bumper that will protect both the shoe and your toes from rock strikes on the trail, and the Match compound rubber sole has a high enough durometer that it shouldn't wear out too quickly with extended hiking.

Our one real durability concern with these shoes is the possibility of a riding impact to the Boa dial. Like most shoes with a Boa closure system, the tension dial sits on the outside of the foot and sticks out about 10mm from the rest o the upper. It isn't common, but we've smashed Boa dials up against rocks on technical terrain and had them release, losing all of the tension across the top of the foot. Luckily, the dials are surprisingly hearty and we've never actually broken one, but the dials on some of our older shoes look like they've gone to war.

Sloped edges at the front and rear of the toe box help you get in...
Sloped edges at the front and rear of the toe box help you get in and out of your pedals quickly.
Photo: Zach Wick

Value


The Mallet Boa certainly isn't an inexpensive shoe. In fact, they're one of the priciest gravity shoes that we tested. Despite the high price, we think they provide a lot of bang for your buck. They're protective and comfortable enough for gravity applications while lightweight, stiff, and breathable enough to double as a trail shoe or even casual cross country shoe. Riders looking for a single do-it-all shoe will find everything they need here, and we think that's enough to justify the slightly higher price. If you're looking for the best power transfer at the expense of walkability then these probably aren't the shoe for you.

Conclusion


Billed by Crankbrothers as a downhill/enduro shoe, the Mallet Boa proved to be a hugely versatile model in our test session. We wore these shoes for everything from burly enduro laps to gravel rides along the coast and didn't find a true weak point. We wouldn't want to wear them for our next cross country race, but I don't think we'll find any gravity-oriented shoe that would fit that mold. We heartily recommend this versatile model for almost any rider out there.

We'll gladly take these shoes out for another ride any time.
We'll gladly take these shoes out for another ride any time.
Photo: Zach Wick

Zach Wick

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