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OneUp Components V2 Review

With a reasonable price and high performance, this post also helps you get the most drop possible
OneUp Components V2
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $209 List | $199.50 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Affordable, very short stack and extended length, adjustable travel with shims, lightweight
Cons:  Remote lever sold separately
Manufacturer:   OneUp Components
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 2, 2020
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85
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 12
  • Smoothness and Functionality - 30% 9
  • Saddle Clamp - 20% 8
  • Remote - 25% 8
  • Ease of Setup - 15% 8
  • Weight - 10% 10

Our Verdict

The OneUp V2 is a quality, and high-performance dropper offered at a very reasonable price. It performed consistently, reliably, and impressively smoothly in compression and extension during testing. The OneUp remote is sold separately and has good ergonomics and a light lever feel. They've also gone out of their way to make the V2 with the shortest stack height and extended length, as well as adjustable travel so that you can squeeze the longest dropper possible onto your bike. The V2 is also quite lightweight, so adding a longer dropper to your bike doesn't come at a weight penalty. If you're on a budget, or even if you're not, we feel the OneUp V2 is worthy of consideration.

Compare to Similar Products

 
OneUp Components V2
Awards Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  Best Buy Award  
Price $199.50 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$309.00 at Backcountry
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$199.00 at Backcountry$176.00 at Amazon
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$249.99 at Backcountry
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Affordable, very short stack and extended length, adjustable travel with shims, lightweightshort stack height, easy setup, great leverAffordable, highly-adjustable, lightweightVery reasonably priced, comes in three drop lengths, adjustable air spring, smooth travelReasonably priced, decent remote lever, easy to install, available in 4 drop lengths
Cons Remote lever sold separatelyLever sold separately, above average weightFirm lever feel, average stack heightLonger overall length, no bling-factorAwkward seat clamp bolts, not as smooth as competition
Bottom Line With a reasonable price and high performance, this post also helps you get the most drop possibleA high-quality, easy-to-set up dropper with one of the best remote levers we testedAn affordably-priced and reliable option with plenty of adjustabilityReliable and consistent performance at an unbeatable priceIf you're on a budget, this reasonably priced model is a good option to consider
Rating Categories OneUp Components V2 Transfer Performanc... PNW Components Loam... Tranz-X Kitsuma Air SDG Components Tellis
Smoothness And Functionality (30%)
9.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
Saddle Clamp (20%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
Remote (25%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Ease Of Setup (15%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Weight (10%)
10.0
7.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Specs OneUp Components V2 Transfer Performanc... PNW Components Loam... Tranz-X Kitsuma Air SDG Components Tellis
Measured Weight (length tested) 662g (180mm) 733g (175mm) 640g (170mm) 732g (200mm) 611g (200mm post only) 51g (remote and hardware) 70g (cable and housing) 712g (170mm)
Grams per millimeter of travel 3.7 4.2 3.8 3.7 4.2
Remote tested OneUp 1x Fox Racing Shox Transfer Remote PNW Loam Lever Tranz-X Kitsuma 1x Tellis remote
Positions Infinitely Adjustable Infinitely Adjustable Infinitely Adjustable Infinitely Adjustable Infinitely Adjustable
Available Diameters 30.9/31.6/34.9mm 30.9/31.6mm 30.9/31.6/34.9mm 30.9/31.6mm 30.9/31.6mm
Available Travel Lengths/Extended Lengths (mm) 120/150/180/210mm, 360/420/480/540mm 100/125/150/175/200mm,
308/363/418/475/531
125/150/170/200mm, 385/440/480/540mm 150/170/200mm, 455/495/558mm 125/150/170mm, 390/440/480mm
Drop length tested/Extended length, claimed 180mm/480mm + 16mm actuator 175mm/475 170mm/480mm 200mm/558mm 170mm/480mm + 27mm actuator
Saddle layback Zero offset Zero offset Zero Offset Zero offset Zero offset
Remote Not included. 1x, SRAM Matchmaker X, Shimano I-Spec EV or I-Spec II available for $49 Fox Racing Shox Transfer Remote 1x (comes with standard clamp, MMX, and I-Spec EV mounts), 2x option available PNW Loam Lever sold separately (SRAM MMX, Shimano I-spec II and I-spec EV, and standard 22.2mm clamp available Tranz-X Kitsuma 1x lever 1x thumb remote
Cable Style Internally routed, cable actuated Internally routed, cable actuated Internally routed, cable actuated Internally routed, cable actuated Internally routed, cable actuated
Stack Height/Ride height 33mm compressed, 213mm extended 38mm compressed, 213mm extended 50mm compressed, 220mm extended(claimed) 55mm compressed, 255mm extended 61mm compressed, 230mm extended
Included Travel adjustment shims, 2-year warranty 1 year warranty Lifetime warranty to original owner Cable and housing, 2-year warranty Cable and housing, 1x remote lever, 2-year warranty
Tested Diameter and travel length. 31.6, 180mm travel 31.6/175mm travel 31.6, 170mm travel 30.9, 200mm travel 31.6, 170mm travel

Our Analysis and Test Results

The OneUp V2 is sold as a post only for $209 (200 and 180mm) or $199 (150 and 120mm), so you can use it with whatever remote lever you choose. OneUp also sells a remote lever that will set you back an additional $49. We tested the V2 with the OneUp remote.

OneUp Components has grown relatively quickly from a small aftermarket drivetrain parts manufacturer to a well known and respected brand with a growing selection of components. Recently, their product offerings have expanded into the cockpit with stems, handlebars, grips, and dropper seatposts. We tested the OneUp V1 dropper in the past, but we'd heard great things about the improved performance and reliability of the V2. Not only is the V2 affordable, but it also has incredibly short stack height and full post lengths, adjustable travel, a quality remote, and very smooth travel. Our testers were quite impressed with the V2, especially considering the asking price.

Performance Comparison


The OneUp dropper is very impressive, especially for the price.
The OneUp dropper is very impressive, especially for the price.
Photo: Ian Pearman

Smoothness and Functionality


Considering the price of the V2 dropper, we were very impressed with its smoothness of travel, ease of compression, consistency, and on-trail performance. Unlike the V1 dropper we tested previously, the V2 performed flawlessly throughout our testing process. It has the slightest bit of lateral saddle play, but so little that it is barely worth mentioning and went unnoticed out on the trail. We felt it worked better than many competitors that cost significantly more.


One of the first things testers noticed about the V2 was how easy it was to compress both by hand and under body weight. Part of our testing process involves cycling each dropper through its travel hundreds of times by hand, and the V2 was among the easiest to compress of all the droppers we tested. Our experience was the same on the trail, where it drops easily and quickly beneath your body weight. Testers found they did not need to consciously weight the saddle in any way to get it to drop the way some models do. That said, it didn't have a complete free-fall feel, but it wasn't far off.

The V2 also impressed us with its extension, and our test post operated very smoothly and never developed any stickiness or sag. The rate of return is adjustable with an air spring valve hidden under the saddle clamp, and you can set it up to operate anywhere from pretty quick to really fast. OneUp recommends pressures in the 250-300psi range, and we found 250psi to be the sweet spot for our tastes. At that pressure, the post extended quickly enough without fear of castration, and it topped out with an audible thunk. By feathering the remote lever, it was also easy to modulate the rate of return and helpful when making incremental adjustments to saddle height.

The saddle clamp has a slotted upper half for easier removal and a...
The saddle clamp has a slotted upper half for easier removal and a unique design to get the saddle rails as low as possible to reduce the stack height.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Saddle Clamp


The V2 has a relatively standard zero-offset two-bolt saddle clamp. There's nothing particularly revolutionary about it, but it does have an attempted user-friendly twist. It looks like a standard 2-bolt clamp design, but OneUp made the top half of the clamp slotted to try and make it slightly easier to install and remove your saddle. While this seems like a great idea, we found it to be finicky and quite difficult to get to the clamp bolts through the slots, and when swapping saddles, we ended up just removing one of the bolts completely anyway. Unlike many other standard 2-bolt clamp designs where you can loosen the clamp enough to squeeze the saddle rails in or out, we found that we were unable to install or remove a saddle without completely removing the top half of the clamp. Fortunately, most riders don't swap or make adjustments to their saddle that frequently. Once a saddle was installed, our saddle clamp did not make any noise, nor did the bolts self-loosen while riding.


Another interesting aspect of the V2's saddle clamp design is the position of the saddle rails. Unlike most competitors that have the saddle rails at or above the top of the post, OneUp has offset them to be lower than the top of the post. This simple design feature has allowed them to be a market leader in terms of stack heights and overall dropper lengths so riders can maximize the amount of drop length they can squeeze on their bikes.

The machined aluminum OneUp remote has good ergonomics, a light...
The machined aluminum OneUp remote has good ergonomics, a light lever feel, a textured lever, and three positions of lateral adjustment.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Remote


The OneUp V2 is sold as a post only for $199 for the 120 and 150mm lengths, and $209 for the 180 and 210mm versions. You can use any remote you like with this post as long as the one you choose clamps the cable at the remote. Should you choose to go with a OneUp lever, they make a handlebar mount, SRAM Matchmaker X, and Shimano I-Spec II and I-Spec EV, all of which cost an additional $49. We bought the handlebar mount OneUp remote to go along with our V2 post for testing.


The new OneUp remote is an improvement over the lever we tested with the V1 dropper. The latest version is crafted from lightweight aluminum and has a large oversized bearing at its pivot. The remote attaches with a screw to the hinged handlebar clamp, and it has three attachment holes machined so that you can adjust it horizontally and line it up perfectly to optimize your thumb reach. The face of the lever itself has texture in the form of tightly packed vertical ridges to add a little grip to the surface.

The lever has a very light actuation force and a very short throw; it's among the easiest levers to press that we've used. The actuator at the bottom of the post is one of the reasons that the lever has such a short-throw; it only has to move a few millimeters to trigger the actuator. Press the lever all the way, and the post drops like a rock or returns to full height. Feather the lever, and you can modulate the rate of return. When used with the V2 dropper, we were very impressed with the OneUp remote.

662-grams is impressively lightweight for a 180mm post including...
662-grams is impressively lightweight for a 180mm post including cable housing and remote.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Weight


We weighed our 31.6mm diameter 180mm travel V2 post, and it tipped the scales at 662g, including the cable, housing, and remote. This is impressively lightweight for a post in this travel length. In grams per millimeter, the OneUp is one of the lightest options in the test at just 3.7-grams/millimeter. So, not only can you squeeze a longer travel dropper onto your bike with the V2, you can do so at little to no weight penalty over other brands.


Installing the V2 is easy due to the fact that the cut end of the...
Installing the V2 is easy due to the fact that the cut end of the cable is at the remote. The head of the cable rests in a bushing that sits in a cradle on the actuator at the bottom of the post.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Ease of Setup


The OneUp V2 is about as easy to install as a cable-actuated post can be. OneUp does not include instructions with the post, but detailed instructions can be found on their website. Like any internally routed dropper post, the most challenging part of the operation is routing the cable housing through your bike's frame. After that, the V2 sets itself apart from the competition with a user-friendly and straightforward process that requires only a set of allen keys and a pair of cable cutters.


At the bottom of the post is OneUp's new 2.1 actuator. This is a small green anodized mechanism that protrudes just a short length off the bottom of the post. Like many cable-actuated droppers, it has a spring-loaded lever for its actuation mechanism. Starting at the post end of the housing, feed the cable through the cable bushing and place it into the slotted cradle on the actuator. Slip the cable through the slot and insert the housing into the bottom of the actuator on the post. Keeping tension on the cable and the housing, slide the post into the seat tube while drawing the cable and housing through towards the front of the bike.

Place the hinged handlebar clamp where you like on the left side of your handlebar, or use your matchmaker compatible brake lever clamp, and attach the remote lever. The remote has three holes side by side to attach it to the handlebar clamp, which allows you to fine-tune the lever's position horizontally to dial in the thumb reach perfectly. Loosen the set screw on the remote lever and feed the end of the cable into the barrel adjuster/cable tensioner and under the set screw/washer on the lever. Tighten the set screw, cut the cable, and crimp the end.

You can shorten the travel by inserting "shims" into the slots...
You can shorten the travel by inserting "shims" into the slots inside the post. This process is quick and easy and can help you dial in the fit for your bike.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

OneUp also includes shims with each post so that you can adjust the length of its travel in 10mm increments. You can't make a shorter travel post longer, but you can reduce the travel of the 180mm post to 170mm or 160mm for the perfect fit on your bike. To do this, it's easiest to watch OneUp's instructional video online. Basically, you loosen the collar at the bottom of the stanchion and slide it up, slide the plastic bushing up and out of the way, and insert the small metal shims into the three slots around the stanchion. Each layer of shims shortens the travel by 10mm. Once the shims are in place, slide the bushing and collar back down and retighten the collar.

Value


The OneUp V2 is one of the least expensive droppers on the market. The shorter travel lengths, 120 and 150mm, are less expensive, but the longer travel options only cost ten dollars more. Even after you purchase a remote lever to go with it, it is still one of the least expensive models in our test selection. Considering its excellent all-around performance, respectable weight, and impressively low stack height and extended lengths, we feel this affordable dropper is an exceptional value.

The OneUp V2 is an impressive dropper and the price is right.
The OneUp V2 is an impressive dropper and the price is right.
Photo: Ian Pearman

Conclusion


The V2 is among the best dropper seatposts in this test, giving its more expensive competition a run for their money. Our testers were very impressed with this post's smooth, consistent, and reliable performance. It's relatively lightweight with a short stack height and adjustable travel so you can squeeze every last bit of drop length onto your bike. The remote also has good ergonomics, a short throw, and a light lever feel, making saddle height changes even easier. This affordable post is worthy of a place on any bike regardless of your budget.

Other Version and Accessories


The OneUp V2 comes in 30.9, 31.6, and 34.9mm diameters and 120, 150, 180, and 210mm drop lengths. OneUp remote levers are sold separately and come with a standard handlebar mount, Matchmaker X, I-Spec EV, and I-Spec II for $49. They also sell a variety of small parts, including replacement cartridges, rebuild kits, replacement actuators, and travel adjust shims.

Jeremy Benson