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Leatt MTB Enduro 3.0 Review

A convertible helmet with stellar half-shell performance but has some quirks in full-face mode
Leatt MTB Enduro 3.0
Photo: Leatt
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Price:  $230 List
Pros:  Simple chin bar attachment/removal, lightweight, well ventilated
Cons:  Styling, uncomfortable in full-face setting, narrow range of applications
Manufacturer:   Leatt
By Pat Donahue ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 3, 2019
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 15
  • Comfort - 25% 7
  • Protection - 20% 6
  • Weight - 20% 9
  • Ventilation - 15% 9
  • Visor - 10% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The light and feathery Leatt MTB 3.0 Enduro is a convertible full-face that trends towards the enduro applications. This is a great option for the rider who wants to grind up big climbs to get to some rough downhills. Yes, the name of this product is a mouthful, but it delivers good on-trail performance in half-shell and decent performance in full-face mode. When in half-shell mode, the DBX 3.0 is as comfortable as any normal trail helmet. In full-face mode, the helmet feels exceptionally light, airy, with a great range of vision. That said, it doesn't feel as burly as some of the dedicated downhill helmets or the other convertible options. This helmet is a decent value for the enduro fanatic who wants one helmet to do it all but isn't likely to spend days banging bike park laps.

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Leatt MTB Enduro 3.0
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Pros Simple chin bar attachment/removal, lightweight, well ventilatedBreathable, more robust than other enduro-focused options, lightweightExtremely light, versatile, comfortableProtective, reasonably priced, comfortableImpressive price tag, comfortable, available in seven sizes
Cons Styling, uncomfortable in full-face setting, narrow range of applicationsNot suited for frequent bike park duties, a little expensiveNot the most protective, mud can clog up the chin bar bar attachment systemAverage ventilation, heavier weight, no rotational impact protection systemWarm, poor ventilation, fit is a little loose
Bottom Line A convertible helmet with stellar half-shell performance but has some quirks in full-face modeA dialed enduro-oriented helmet that delivers excellent breathability and solid protectionAn extremely light and well-ventilated convertible full-face helmet suited for aggressive trail and enduro ridingA full-face helmet that boasts a strong value and high levels of protectionA respectable full-face helmet at a stunning price tag
Rating Categories Leatt MTB Enduro 3.0 Smith Mainline MIPS Bell Super Air R MIPS Troy Lee Designs D3... 7Protection M1
Comfort (25%)
7.0
10.0
9.0
10.0
9.0
Protection (20%)
6.0
8.0
6.0
9.0
8.0
Weight (20%)
9.0
9.0
10.0
6.0
8.0
Ventilation (15%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
6.0
5.0
Visor (10%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
7.0
Durability (10%)
7.0
8.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Specs Leatt MTB Enduro 3.0 Smith Mainline MIPS Bell Super Air R MIPS Troy Lee Designs D3... 7Protection M1
Weight (size medium) 14.2 oz - half-shell 26.8 oz - full face 27.0 oz 14.9 oz - half shell 23.8 oz - full face 41.0 oz 33.4 oz
Number of Vents 23 21 18 helmet, 8 chin vents, 4 brow ports 13 17
Shell Material Polycarbonate Aerocore Polycarbonate Fiberglass Polycarbonate
Sizes 3 3 3 3 7
CPSC Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
CE EN1077 Yes No No No Yes
CE EN1078 Yes No Yes Yes Yes
ASTM F1952 No Yes No Yes Yes
ASTM F2032-06 No No No No Yes
ASTM F2040 No No No No Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

Given the light and versatile design, the MTB 3.0 Enduro had some obvious strengths and weaknesses. This helmet fared well in the comfort, weight, and ventilation metrics while the ever-important protection metric wasn't a strong suit. The Bell Super Air R MIPS is still our favorite convertible option.

Performance Comparison


The DBX 3.0 has a distinct look. It is polarizing to say the least.
The DBX 3.0 has a distinct look. It is polarizing to say the least.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Comfort


The MTB 3.0 Enduro offers decent comfort levels. This is an exceptionally comfortable helmet in half-shell mode. In the full-face setting, the comfort levels take a business-like approach and work aside from a quirk or two.

In full-face mode, the padding on the cheeks is snug without feeling like it is squeezing your face too tight. It certainly trends towards the tighter side in this area, and riders with more prominent jaws or cheeks may have a problem with this lid. The padding material feels quite a bit denser than some of the other ultra-plush options like the Giro Disciple MIPS which feels like a pillow. The crown of the head also has a fairly firm feel. The 360 Turbine impact protection system forgoes comfortable padding in favor of almost a dozen, little circles made of ArmourGel. We will discuss this in more detail in the protection section, but this isn't outstandingly comfortable. They may offer improved levels of protection, but we feel they are less comfortable than a nice plush fabric.

The retention dial is in the way when you put this helmet on in full...
The retention dial is in the way when you put this helmet on in full face mode.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

One other notable quirk is that after you have transitioned this helmet from half-shell mode to full-face mode, it can be difficult to put it back on. The BOA adjustment system needs to be set a little tighter in trail/half-shell mode compared to the full face setting. As a result, after reinstalling the chin bar, the BOA dial and retention dial is somewhat in your way when trying to stuff your head in the helmet. You need to loosen the helmet to put it on and then tighten the dial once it's on your head.

The removable chin bar system is very simple and well-executed.
The removable chin bar system is very simple and well-executed.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Protection


This helmet is EN1078 and CPSC 1203 certified. This high-quality helmet is loaded with features and has the safety certifications, but it doesn't feel as protective as some of the other helmets in this test. Part of this phenomenon is that our mind kind of assumes a slim-fitting and lightweight helmet to be flimsy and weak. Bigger and burly helmets feel a whole lot more confidence-inspiring when charging downhill at full speed.

The rear offers a nice amount of coverage.
The rear offers a nice amount of coverage.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The main construction of this lid uses EPS foam. This is very common in cycling helmets as it is lightweight and simple; nothing out of the ordinary here. As soon as you look inside the helmet, you can see ten, blue, circular, Turbines. These Turbines sort of mimic a MIPS liner. In the event of an angled impact, these turbines are designed to allow some rotation and reduce the rotational forces that will reach the brain. You can use your thumbs to wiggle these turbines fairly easily.

The "turbines" allow the helmet to rotate slightly in the event of...
The "turbines" allow the helmet to rotate slightly in the event of an angled impact.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Weight


The MTB 3.0 Enduro weighs 26.8-ounces in full-face mode. As a half-shell, it weighs 14.2-ounces.

The lightweight feel is immediately noticeable as soon as you slide this helmet on. We have worn this lid for hours on end, and there is no strain on the neck or shoulders from having to hold this helmet up. This low weight is a fantastic attribute if you plan on pedaling or hauling this helmet uphill under your own power.

The DBX 3.0 allows plenty of air to reach your melon.
The DBX 3.0 allows plenty of air to reach your melon.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Ventilation


This is an enduro-focused lid. Enduro racers are often hammering the pedals and are on the gas hard during a race stage. The chin bar has three main ports in the front. The ventilation port located front and center has a fine screen to keep debris out. The two horizontal vents located on either side do not have a screen are totally open ports. The portion of the chin bar closer to the ears also has an unobstructed vent on each side.

This lid is best suited for the enduro application.
This lid is best suited for the enduro application.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The top of the helmet has plenty of airflow too with many vents. In fact, the upper portion of the helmet has a whopping 18 vents. The DBX keeps your head relatively cool whether you are in half-shell mode or the full-face setting.

The Leatt helmet has a stout visor.
The Leatt helmet has a stout visor.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Visor


The MTB 3.0 Enduro has a sensibly sized visor. It is not as robust as some of the dedicated full-face helmets. That said, it is long enough to be functional without looking too goofy and huge when the helmet is in half-shell mode.

The visor is anchored at three points. There are pivots above each temple on the side of the helmet and one on the main slider on the center of the helmet. All of these anchor points use the same-sized retention screws. These screws are about .75-inches in diameter. They are a little on the smaller side, but they can still be loosened and tightened with gloves on while the helmet is on your head. The visor angle can be adjusted, and the front edge moves about three inches from the highest to the lowest position. The visor bends easily with force. We didn't want to flex the visor too hard and break it. That said, we think it could withstand some indirect impacts without snapping. That said, it is designed to break away in the event of a direct impact to reduce the forces that reach the head.

In half-shell mode, the visor moves up so you can rest your goggles...
In half-shell mode, the visor moves up so you can rest your goggles. So enduro.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The name Leatt is displayed in large text on the visor. It is also located on the brow just below the visor. We didn't particularly care for this aesthetic as our testers don't like feeling like a billboard.

The chin bar removal and attachment system still functions well and...
The chin bar removal and attachment system still functions well and has no play.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Durability


Throughout testing, the MTB 3.0 Enduro showed no signs of weakening or deteriorating. This helmet uses a Fidlock closure system instead of a traditional D-Clip or buckle. This is a magnetic system that is simple and effective once your technique is dialed. The removable chin bar was super easy to use and remains solid. We probably removed and reinstalled the chin bar 50 times.

We sweat quite a bit into this helmet. There are no signs of paint fade or chipping after being continuously soaked in sweat.

The DBX 3.0 in its natural habitat.
The DBX 3.0 in its natural habitat.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Extras


The MTB 3.0 Enduro comes with a couple of extras including a helmet bag and some extra padding should you wear through or need to replace the existing pads.

Value


The MTB 3.0 Enduro is a strong value for the right buyer. You are essentially getting two helmets and one and both function well within the intended application. If you're looking to rip park laps, there are more protective helmets that cost much less.

This helmet isn't our top choice for bike park laps, but it works...
This helmet isn't our top choice for bike park laps, but it works well for big climbs to get to some gnar.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Conclusion


The Leatt MTB 3.0 Enduro is a solid option in the convertible full-face realm. This lid is a stellar option for the enduro racer or the rider who needs to pedal up to the top of his or her favorite rowdy descent.

Pat Donahue

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