Hands-on Gear Review

Allen Sports Steel Review

Allen Sports Steel
Price:  $200 List | $102.74 at Amazon
Pros:  Inexpensive, lightweight, great ventilation, low profile
Cons:  Small wheels, not weather resistant, poor hitch mechanism
Bottom line:  For parents seeking an inexpensive and low-profile trailer for short trips around town, the Allen Sports Steel is a great place to start.
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Converts to Stroller?:  No
Number of Children:  2
Harness System:  3-point with lap belt
Manufacturer:   Allen Sports

Our Verdict

The Allen Sports Steel is a basic bike trailer that impressed us with its efficiency and overall value but fell short in protection and passenger comfort. The trailer is small, lightweight and lower profile than any of the others we tested, making it easy to tow and to tuck away at the end of the day. However, its bare-bones roll cage and unpadded seating area make it a less safe and less comfortable option than higher-end trailers like our Editors' Choice winner, the Burley D'Lite, or our Best Bang for the Buck, the Burley Bee. Overall, we would recommend this model for families who are looking to get out occasionally for short trips on paved roads. Beyond that, the Allen doesn't pull its weight.



RELATED REVIEW: The 9 Best Bike Trailers for Kids


Our Analysis and Test Results

Review by:
Joanna Trieger

Last Updated:
Saturday
July 1, 2017

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Performance Comparison


The Allen is a basic bike trailer that will get you and your family on the road easily and affordably, if not very comfortably.

Enjoying a slightly bumpy ride in the Allen bike trailer.
Enjoying a slightly bumpy ride in the Allen bike trailer.

Protection


Like all of the trailers we tested, the Allen meets ASTM safety standards. Beyond that, it doesn't go as far as most of the other trailers we tested regarding safety features. Its roll cage is minimal, with no top or back framing, and the harness is three-point with a lap belt, rather five-point.

The Allen's interior. The three-point harness straps and lap belt are unpadded and feature carabiner-style clips  rather than the five-point buckle in most of the other trailers we tested.
The Allen's interior. The three-point harness straps and lap belt are unpadded and feature carabiner-style clips, rather than the five-point buckle in most of the other trailers we tested.

The Allen is extremely well-ventilated, making it an excellent choice for rides on warm days. There is no suspension in this trailer, so we wouldn't recommend using it to haul your kiddos over rough trails.

Our passenger testers appreciated being able to step easily in and out of the Allen Sports Steel.
Our passenger testers appreciated being able to step easily in and out of the Allen Sports Steel.

Passenger Experience


The Allen model offers a relatively no-frills passenger experience, but for short rides around town, it gets the job done. Our passenger testers appreciated that the front of this trailer unclips completely, allowing them to climb in all by themselves. The harness is unpadded and uses carabiner-style clips, rather than the more secure five-point harness and buckle found in most of the other trailers we tested.

For a more luxe passenger experience, we'd recommend checking out our Editors' Choice, the Burley D'Lite.

This trailer's light weight and low profile makes it one of the easiest to tow on paved roads.
This trailer's light weight and low profile makes it one of the easiest to tow on paved roads.

Biker Experience


With its relatively light weight and small profile, the Allen Sports Steel was easy to tow and performed better than we expected in this category. We noticed only a little bit of lurching while riding, likely due to the spring in the tow arm, but didn't observe any other feedback. This model's main disadvantage in this category comes from its small wheels — at just 16" in diameter, these wheels were on par with the InStep Take 2 but were smaller than all the others we tested. The difference wasn't significant on smooth surfaces, but we had to expend more energy to tow this trailer off-road. Trailers that provided a better experience for the biker include the Burley D'Lite and the Burley Bee.

Ease of Use


The Allen is straightforward to assemble, with frame tubes that snap together, held in place with D-clips. This process was tricky to get the hang of at first, resulting in some pinched fingers, but setup got easier with practice. The trailer attaches to the bike with a steel adaptor that's clamped to the frame by the rear quick release skewer, as do all the trailers we tested. The hitch uses a male-female system so that the end of the trailer's tow arm slots over the protruding hitch. Of all the hitch types we tested, this was the least user-friendly.

Inserting the hitch into the tow arm required lining the trailer up perfectly with the bike, which often took several tries. We had to lean the bike over to get the angle of the hitch to match the tow arm, which is tricky to do with one hand and isn't conducive to keeping your hands clean if you're on your way to work. Most of the other trailers, including the Thule Chariot Cross, the Burley D'Lite, and the Burley Bee, had hitches that were easier to line up and attach. As with all of the trailers we tested, the Allen's hitch may not work with every bike; for more on this, see our Buying Advice Guide.

Versatility


The Allen is a bike trailer only — no stroller options or other sport conversions are available with this model. The cargo space in this trailer was smaller than most of the others we tested, with a 22" by 7.5" cargo area footprint. The Allen's seats don't have the option to lie flat, like the ones in the Burley D'Lite and the InStep Take 2, but they are positioned far back enough in the trailer that a medium-sized dog could curl up comfortably in the main compartment.

The Allen could handle hauling a full load of groceries  but only with no passengers.
The Allen could handle hauling a full load of groceries, but only with no passengers.

Best Applications


This bike trailer is a great affordable option for families who want to give bike trailers a try but aren't ready to invest in all the bells and whistles yet. It is best suited to shorter trips on paved roads around town. This is a solid trailer for hauling kiddos or cargo, but probably not both at once. Exceptional ventilation and big windows make the Allen a good option for fair-weather climates.

Value


At just $200, the Allen is one of the least expensive products we tested and offers a great value for families looking for their first taste of travel by trailer. With its relatively high ratings in the ease of use and biker experience categories, we were surprised that it was priced so low, and we think it's a better value than the slightly less expensive InStep Take 2. Make no mistake, though: This is a very basic trailer. If your plans include off-road travel, longer trips or rides in inclement weather, then a higher-end model like the Burley Bee is worth the investment.

Conclusion


The Allen Sports Steel is a pared-down introductory bike trailer that will get you and your kids on the road without destroying your wallet. It's light and small, so it's easy to set up and tow, but it's pretty basic on the inside, so not very cush for passengers.

Joanna Trieger

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Most recent review: July 1, 2017
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:  
  • 1
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  • 5
 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:  
 (0.0)
Rating Distribution
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5 star: 0%  (0)
4 star: 0%  (0)
3 star: 100%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)


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