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OneUp Components EDC V2 Review

A fully-featured and innovative tool that will help you go pack-less and is always there when you need it
OneUp Components EDC V2
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $60 List | $54.90 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  On-bike integration, extra storage, feature-packed
Cons:  Some plastic parts, multiple pieces, expensive
Manufacturer:   OneUp Components
By Zach Wick ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 20, 2021
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82
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 14
  • Ergonomics - 25% 7
  • Features - 25% 9
  • Ease of Use - 20% 7
  • Portability - 20% 10
  • Durability - 10% 8

Our Verdict

With a few tweaks and improvements over the original award-winning tool, the OneUp EDC V2 remains a unique and convenient option for anyone looking to cut down on their pack weight or leave it at home entirely. Like the original, the V2 stores either in your bike's steerer tube or in OneUp's frame-mounted EDC pump, so it will always be available when you need it. A small multi-tool, chain breaker, and tire lever provide 20 functions, and the EDC now includes two sealed storage capsules—one large and one small—giving you more storage options. The V2 also has an improved chain breaker, more durable spoke keys, and a lower-friction design for easier access. Despite its higher price and setup requirements, we love the innovative design and will jump at any chance to leave the pack at home.

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Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $54.90 at Amazon
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$28 List$37.95 at Backcountry
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$34.95 at Amazon
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Pros On-bike integration, extra storage, feature-packedLoads of functions, neoprene cover, tubeless plug insertion toolSimple layout, lightweight, ergonomic framePortability, on-bike storage, ergonomicsLightest in the test, small, durable
Cons Some plastic parts, multiple pieces, expensiveExpensive, moderate weightchain tool lacks leverage, short bitsSlower to use, multiple piecesMediocre ergonomics
Bottom Line A fully-featured and innovative tool that will help you go pack-less and is always there when you need itThis model is feature-packed with 30 functions loaded into a moderate size and weight unitAn inexpensive, user-friendly multi-tool with all of the basic functions necessary to keep you rollingThis model offers riders freedom from their pack with 15 ergonomic functions and storage for a flat-repair kitBoasting the lightest weight in our test, this model packs 16 functions into its reinforced polymer frame
Rating Categories OneUp Components ED... ToPeak Mini PT30 Pro Bike Tool 17 in 1 Blackburn Switch Wrap ToPeak Ninja 16+
Ergonomics (25%)
7.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
7.0
Features (25%)
9.0
10.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Ease Of Use (20%)
7.0
8.0
9.0
6.0
8.0
Portability (20%)
10.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
10.0
Durability (10%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
Specs OneUp Components ED... ToPeak Mini PT30 Pro Bike Tool 17 in 1 Blackburn Switch Wrap ToPeak Ninja 16+
Weight 128g 163g 112g 178g 93g
Number of Functions 20 30 17 15 16
Weight With Cover N/A 170g 118g N/A N/A
Hex Wrenches (mm) 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 mm 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 mm 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 mm
Torx T25 T10, T15, T25 T25 T25 & T30 T10, T15 and T25
Screwdrivers Flat head Flat head, Philips Phillips Flat head Flat head, Philips
Chain Tool Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Addtional Tools Tire lever, spoke wrench sizes 0,1,2,3, presta valve core tool, spare rotor bolt, tubeless plug tool Knife, plug tool, master link tool, brake pad spacer, chain hook, spoke wrenches sizes 14, 15, Mavic M7 and Shimano 4.5 Spoke wrenches sizes 13, 14, 15, 16, and Mavic Spline, bottle opener T-wrench, L-wrench, chainbreaker, disk pad spreader, hex wrench Spoke wrenches
Size, Length x Width x Depth/thickness 7 1/2 x 7/8 diameter 3 x 1 3/4 x 3/4 1 3/4 x 2 3/4 x 1/2 4 7/10 x 3 x 3 2 2/5 x 1 3/10 x 1/2

Our Analysis and Test Results

As a relative newcomer to the mountain bike industry OneUp Components has quickly made a name for itself by providing thoughtful, well-designed products. The company was founded by a small group of mountain bikers and industry veterans who wanted to design better parts for their own bikes, and they have since delivered a variety of great products from dropper posts and handlebars to chainrings and axles. The V2 update to their popular EDC tool system isn't a drastic departure from the original design. It still stores in your bike's steerer tube or EDC pump and packs the same functions as the original, but a few tweaks make this version a bit more versatile, user-friendly, and durable.

Performance Comparison


The tool assembly stores conveniently in the EDC pump or your...
The tool assembly stores conveniently in the EDC pump or your steerer tube.
Photo: Zach Wick

Features


The EDC V2's main features remain largely unchanged from the original version, but an updated chain breaker and an extra sealed storage compartment are nice updates. The overall package is the same, and with twenty essential functions, this model still packs just about every tool you might reasonably need to keep your bike rolling through a mid-ride mechanical. The multi-piece system comprises a small multi-tool, a chain breaker/tire lever, and a storage unit with two separate sealed chambers. The multi-tool and tire lever clip neatly together with the storage unit threaded onto the bottom, and the whole thing slides smoothly into your steerer tube or the EDC frame-mounted 100cc pump.


The small multi-tool was our most heavily-used piece of the system during our field test. It contains 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm Hex/Allen keys, a Torx 25, a flat head screwdriver, a quick link breaker, and an EDC top cap tool. Together these bits make up the most common tools necessary for a quick trailside repair. The separate chain breaker/tire lever piece is held together with a spare rotor bolt rather than the spare chainring bolt that the V1 tool used—likely because more chainrings have used a lock ring mounting system in recent years. The tire lever doubles as a handle for the chain breaker, and the chain breaker includes sizes 0, 1, 2, and 3 spoke wrenches and a presta valve core tool machined into its side.

In addition to the tools, the EDC V2's main unit also has two separate sealed compartments. The larger of two can be used to store things like tire patches, extra cash, and zip ties, while the smaller compartment is perfect for carrying a tubeless plug jabber. If you would rather carry a CO2 cartridge than the tubeless plugs you can remove the cap for the smaller storage container and thread your cartridge into the EDC's plastic body.

When we tested the original EDC we stored it in the steerer tube, but this time around we chose to try out the frame-mounted EDC Pump to see how it works. The pump conveniently attaches to your bottle cage mount and stores the tool inside its hollow handle. Like most frame pumps, it can be a bit time-consuming and labor-intensive to pump up a tire, but the pump's head doubles as a CO2 inflator for those times where you're in a rush.

The updated chain breaker is far more ergonomically friendly than...
The updated chain breaker is far more ergonomically friendly than than the original.
Photo: Zach Wick

Ergonomics


The EDC V2 isn't the most ergonomic model we tested, but it holds its own considering the multi-tool's small size. Despite being only two and a quarter inches long and three-quarters of an inch wide, the multi-tool provides decent leverage and the tools are long enough to access hard-to-reach bolts. The sides of the frame are smooth and rounded, allowing you to apply pressure to unstick or adequately torque a finicky bolt without any discomfort. We wouldn't recommend this tool to unstick corroded bolts or as a workshop mainstay, but for emergency on-trail fixes it will absolutely get the job done.


In our opinion, the EDC V2's best ergonomic feature and its biggest improvement over the original version of the tool is the chain breaker. The original EDC's chain breaker required the user to hold the chain in a kinked position in order to punch out the pin, but the new version follows a more traditional design and lets you lay the chain flat across the surface in front of the pin punch. When using the tire lever as a handle for the chain breaker and the mini tool to punch out a chain pin you have plenty of leverage to get the job done. Once you have everything set up properly, this is one of the easiest chain breakers to use among any multi-tools we tested.

We stored our test model in the EDC pump, which mounts conveniently...
We stored our test model in the EDC pump, which mounts conveniently beneath a bottle cage.
Photo: Zach Wick

Portability


Despite being the biggest tool in our test at seven and a half inches long, the EDC V2 receives a perfect score in our portability metric. We think the fact that this tool can live in your steerer or in a frame-mounted pump makes it more portable than any of the traditional multi-tools we tested. With the EDC, it's improbable that you'll forget your multi-tool at home, no last-second searches through the garage, and most importantly, no need for a pack on short to mid-length rides. Add in the fact that this tool is on the lighter end of the spectrum at just 128 grams for the whole package. Most of the tools we tested come in around the 160 to 170-gram range for a similar number of functions.


The only real portability issue with the EDC V2 is that your bike has to be modified to store it in your steerer tube. We tested the original EDC using the steerer storage. Setting it up is a relatively straightforward process that involves removing the star nut, threading your steerer using OneUp's tap and guide, and installing their top cap, but it does take some time and additional parts/money. One up also makes a new Threadless Carrier that fits into your steerer tube to carry your EDC tool without threading it. Once your bike is set up you can simply slide the EDC into and out of the steerer, but if you want to swap over to a different bike you're out of luck. The pump storage system that we tested allows you to use the EDC on multiple bikes more easily, but you will still have to swap over the pump's bottle cage mount if/when you do.

Between the threaded storage containers, the chain breaker/tire...
Between the threaded storage containers, the chain breaker/tire lever, and the mini tool, there are a number of pieces to keep track of.
Photo: Zach Wick

Ease of Use


The EDC V2 has some upsides but also some considerable downsides when compared against the ease of use of a traditional multi-tool. On the positive side, the tool is always within arms reach when you're out on the trail. You won't have to dig through your pack or pull out all the contents of your saddlebag to access it. This is especially true if you're storing the tool in your steerer tube rather than the pump. Once you have the small multi-tool piece in hand it's very straightforward. The mini tool uses a traditional layout and each of the bits is easy to identify and access. On the negative side, however, is the fact that you can't use the tool without separating the system into its three pieces. This means you'll either need an extra set of hands or you'll need to leave a couple pieces in the dirt while you're working. Reassembling and storing everything back in the steerer or pump can be a bit finicky at first as well, but once you're familiar with the system it's pretty straightforward.


We also dinged this tool's ease-of-use score slightly because of the setup required. Unlike the vast majority of plug-and-play multi-tools out there that you can pull out of the packaging and take out on a ride, the EDC V2 requires some setup whether you're storing it in your steerer or the pump. The setup isn't too difficult or time-intensive, but it's an added step before you're able to hit the trails. For riders who can't stand carrying a pack or having a multi-tool jangling around in their pocket, it's absolutely a worthy time investment.

The mini tool's bits stood up well to our field test.
The mini tool's bits stood up well to our field test.
Photo: Zach Wick

Durability


Overall, the EDC V2 is a well-made and sturdy product. The updated version has a sturdier steel chain breaker and spoke wrenches that won't round out over time. The wrenches on our test tool look just as fresh after a month of heavy use as they did when we pulled it out of the package.


Our biggest concern with this model is the largely plastic construction. The mini tool and chain breaker's fit in the main package rely on plastic pieces that snap together, and after our test session, they were already showing noticeable wear. Considering that most users hopefully won't be using the tool as much as we were when we were deliberately putting it through its paces, we think it will last you a long time. We do recommend being gentle when removing and replacing the mini tool and tire lever, however.

The plastic tire lever doubles as a structural element of the tool...
The plastic tire lever doubles as a structural element of the tool assembly when stored. If you're not careful the plastic can wear easily.
Photo: Zach Wick

Value


The innovative design and ease of transportation that the EDC V2 provides doesn't come cheap. It's one of the most expensive multi-tools on the market, and when you add in the extra cost of the top cap and steerer threading kit, threadless carrier, or the EDC pump, it will cost you more than twice as much as many of the other top models we tested. Despite the high price tag, we think this product offers plenty of value for the right user. If you're looking to ditch your pack but still be prepared for anything out on the trail, we think this is one of the best options out there.

Conclusion


While it isn't a huge departure from the original EDC, the V2 features some key improvements over an already-award-winning multi-tool. The unique design is an elegant solution to the ever-present preparedness issue when out on the trails. With enough tools to keep you rolling and extra storage for flat repair equipment, this tool has you just about completely covered for short to mid-length rides. The price tag is high, but so is the value that this tool brings.

The pack-averse among us will love this little tool.
The pack-averse among us will love this little tool.
Photo: Zach Wick

Other Versions and Accessories


We tested the EDC V2 using the 100cc frame-mounted pump, but you can also use the EDC V2 with the smaller 70cc pump, just without the sealed storage compartments.

OneUp also offers a nine-function EDC Lite tool that stores in your steerer tube without the need to remove your star nut or thread the tube.

The EDC tool suite also includes a tire plug and plier kit that can be purchased separately. The plug kit will fit perfectly inside the EDC V2's small sealed capsule and the pliers will fit in the larger one.

Zach Wick