How to Choose the Perfect Camping Chair

Testers loved the feel (and the price) of the Kijaro!
Article By:
Maggie Brandenburg
Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Tuesday

When most people think of a camping chair, they picture a simple fabric chair that is portable and easy to set-up. But portability and ease of set-up are just the most minimal of standards nowadays. In fact, you no longer have to give up convenience or comfort when you enter a campground! That said, given the number of choices on the market today, it can be challenging to know which camp chair is the best for you. In this review, we tested 14 chairs over a summer season, mostly by using them in car camping scenarios, but also by bringing them to the beach, to football games, and to barbecues. We rated them not just according to their portability and ease of assembly, but also according to their comfort and durability. That's right-camping chairs can actually be comfortable! In this article, we will guide you through the process of purchasing a chair that perfectly suits your needs! Read on to learn more!

Types of Camping Chairs


We tested two main types of chairs: traditional camping chairs and portable chairs. The traditional chairs were elevated off of the ground and had four points of contact with the ground (except for the Sportbrella, which had more due to its foot rest). Testers unanimously favored the traditional chairs for comfort, stability, and presence of additional features, like cup holders, coolers, etc.

The traditional camping chair contestants. Top (left to right): Coleman Quad  Sport-Brella  ALPS King Kong; bottom (left to right): REI Camp X  Eureka  Kijaro.
The traditional camping chair contestants. Top (left to right): Coleman Quad, Sport-Brella, ALPS King Kong; bottom (left to right): REI Camp X, Eureka, Kijaro.

[photoid= 279682]
The traditional camping chair contestants. Top (left to right): Coleman Quad  Sport-Brella  ALPS King Kong; bottom (left to right): REI Camp X  Eureka  Kijaro.
The traditional camping chair contestants. Top (left to right): Coleman Quad, Sport-Brella, ALPS King Kong; bottom (left to right): REI Camp X, Eureka, Kijaro.

The portable models were significantly lighter weight and smaller than the traditional chairs. They were cute, but their smaller stature meant that their seat height was much lower to the ground. As a result they were harder to get out of. The smaller frames of these models were less stable and some models made testers fear that they would literally fall out of their chair if they leaned too far to a given direction.

All of the portable models that we tested: Top  left to right: Therm-a-Rest Treo  Helinox Chair One  REI Stowaway Low  Alite Mantis. Bottom  left to right: Helinox Chair Zero  Helinox Chair One  Moon Lence Ultralight  REI Flex Lite  Onepack Ultralight.
All of the portable models that we tested: Top, left to right: Therm-a-Rest Treo, Helinox Chair One, REI Stowaway Low, Alite Mantis. Bottom, left to right: Helinox Chair Zero, Helinox Chair One, Moon Lence Ultralight, REI Flex Lite, Onepack Ultralight.

Nonetheless, these models could be worth sacrificing a little comfort and stability if you want to have a portable seat that packs well and is light weight. The majority are far too bulky to be Backpacking Chair candidates, but they could still fit in a beach bag or large pack.

All of the portable models that we tested. Left to right: Therm-a-Rest Treo  Big Agnes Helinox  REI Stowaway Low  Alite Mantis.
All of the portable models that we tested. Left to right: Therm-a-Rest Treo, Big Agnes Helinox, REI Stowaway Low, Alite Mantis.

Typical Uses for Camping Chairs


To help guide your purchase, we first recommend considering how you might use your camp chair. Below, we list several typical use scenarios.

Car Camping & Tailgating


These activities demand the most comfort, which was our most important metric. Car camping and tailgating typically don't involve a lot of walking, so bulk and size aren't much of an issue. Superior value and durability are always preferred, but let's face it: after a long day of hiking or climbing, you don't want to collapse into the chair that is the best bargain, you want to sit in the model that is the most comfortable. The ALPS Mountaineering King Kong, our Editors' Choice selection, is pricey and bulky, but it was so cozy that testers would fight over it after a long day in the mountains.

The Kijaro Dual Lock Folding Chair is another super popular model for lounging, but it offers a little more back support than the King Kong. It doesn't have much of a "slouchy" feel, and many testers preferred the tautness of its seat. Another good contender if you frequently car camp or tailgate is the REI Camp X. This affordable model is one of the smallest traditional models that we tested and takes up less space in the back of your truck with all your other pre-game supplies. It also has well-ventilated fabric and a creative cup holder that can fit drinks of many sizes.

There is no better name for this chair than the King Kong - it's huge  strong  and... cozy?
There is no better name for this chair than the King Kong - it's huge, strong, and... cozy?

Beach


Bringing a camp chair to the beach is an excellent way to read, sunbathe, and lounge all day long (without getting sandy or straining your neck to read). For beach use, we recommend seeking out a mesh chair and trying to choose a lighter color that won't get too hot in the sun. The mesh will keep you well-ventilated as you soak up the sun. It's also important to purchase a chair with wide feet, or to plan ahead to find ways to keep your chair from sinking into the sand while you lounge.

Of the models we tested, it was the most comfortable one to sit in for long periods of time. Its unique tall back provides good head support and it has much-needed ventilated fabric behind your whole back and tush. It also has a large side pocket for holding drinks, sunscreen, and other necessities. If you have to park farther away and have a long walk to the beach, the REI Camp Stowaway Low is another great beachside lounger. is another great beachside lounger. It is highly portable, has a well-ventilated back, and sits just a few inches off of the ground. The Onepack Ultralight (link) is another great option for a farther-away beach. At just over a third the weight of the Stowaway, the Onepack is not only more portable, but also has handy little discs on the bottoms of its feet to stop that pesky sand sink. Though it has less mesh and no cupholders or other storage, the Onepack can still make a great portable beach chair for folks looking for a further (more private?) beach.

Eureka Curvy chair is a great option for the beach thanks to its mesh back and seat.
Eureka Curvy chair is a great option for the beach thanks to its mesh back and seat.

Short Backcountry Trips


This category includes anyone who feels that the size and weight of their camping chairs are of large concern, such as for activities like backpacking, fishing, walking to an outdoor concert, etc. For example, let's say you're planning a backcountry camping trip and even though you'll be hiking a few miles with your backpacking backpack, you want to really be able to kick back and relax once you're at camp. In this scenario, a portable camp chair is a great option. It will only add 1-2 pounds to your pack, but you'll have a cozy off-the-ground seat for toasting marshmallows. Our favorite model for these types of situations is the Big Agnes Helinox Chair One. It was only a few inches away from being our smallest model, but still only weighed 1 lb and 14 oz. One of the biggest problems with the Helinox is its lack of stability. If stability is a concern for you, then check out the REI Stowaway Low, which still only weighs 5 lb and 6 oz and is much more portable than any of the traditional models. It is incredibly sturdy and great for lounging. If you're interested in even lighter weight chairs, read up on backpacking chairs below.

The Helinox's frame was several inches wider than that of the Mantis  another model that had a very similar construction. This difference means that the Helinox is much more stable.
The Helinox's frame was several inches wider than that of the Mantis, another model that had a very similar construction. This difference means that the Helinox is much more stable.

Identifying Your Needs


Now that you've thought about how you might use your camping chair, start thinking about how those uses translate into specific needs. For example, have kids? Well then maybe storage is a very important feature for you. From snacks to sunscreen, you need quick and easy access to an array of necessary items. The REI Camp X is a chair with great value and good portability that is not only easy to carry, but can easily hold all of your essentials. If you live in a rainy climate or plan on using a chair for water activities, make sure to check out the models that dry the fastest. We like the REI Stowaway Low for these situations. For particularly tall or older shoppers, maybe consider some of the models with higher seat heights. They are significantly easier to get in and out of and will make you more inclined to want to use the chair. The King Kong and Coleman Oversize Quad Chair with Cooler had higher, more ergonomic seat heights.

As you read our full review, decide which of our evaluation criteria (comfort, portability, durability, and ease of set-up) are the most important for you, and then read up on the product(s) that performed the best in these areas.

Types of Camping Chairs


The chairs we reviewed fell into one of two categories: traditional or portable. We tested six traditional chairs and eight portable models. Each category has its own set of pros and cons.

Traditional-Style Camp Chairs


Traditional models are generally more comfortable because they offer more back support and they are higher off of the ground so they are easier to get into and out of. If you want to buy a camp chair specifically with lounging in mind, then we urge you to consider the traditional models. These are a great choice if you have lots of space in your car and don't mind lugging around extra weight. The traditional models we tested were all one piece (even when collapsed) and required just seconds to set-up. Generally, all one has to do in order to set up these chairs is pull apart two opposing ends of the chair and it will set up practically by itself.

The Camp X  a smaller traditional model  was a good all-around performer.
The Camp X, a smaller traditional model, was a good all-around performer.

Portable Camp Chairs


The portable models scored highest on our portability metric (surprise!). These chairs are smaller, lighter weight, lower to the ground, and required more time to assemble. They were also less comfortable than our traditional models and significantly less stable. They are an ideal chair to have if you want a seat that you have to carry for a significant amount of time or if you are severely limited on space. The REI Stowaway Low was the most comfortable and stable of the portable models that we tested, but it was also significantly heavier and bigger than its competitors in this group. If you're in the market for a portable chair, we highly suggest the Big Agnes Helinox Chair One, our pick for Best Portable Camping Chair. However, if you can't quite justify the paying the price of some of these portable models, we recommend considering the Moon Lence Ultralight, our portable camping chair Best Buy on a Lean Budget award winner. The Therm-a-Rest Treo was a contemporary and attractive looking model that packed down to the size of a one-liter water bottle. The downside to the Treo was that its three leg base was incredibly unstable to sit on and never failed at threatening to buck testers out of its seat.

Our testers think that the suspension on the Mantis is fairly comfortable  but its seat isn't quite as cozy as the Helinox.
Our testers think that the suspension on the Mantis is fairly comfortable, but its seat isn't quite as cozy as the Helinox.

Backpacking Chairs


Backpacking chairs are typically lighter and more packable than their portable camp chair cousins. These are the chairs to purchase if you're planning to hike into the backcountry and want a chair that prioritizes low weight and bulk over comfort. However, with newer technology, some portable camping chairs are now just as light or lighter than many backpacking chairs, while offering increased comfort. At 1lb. 14oz., the Helinox Chair One and Alite Mantis Chair are the same weight as the heaviest backpacking chairs we tested. Even lighter, the REI Flex Lite is extremely comparable to backpacking chair weight. Most impressively, the Helinox Chair One is lighter than 4 of the 6 backpacking chairs we tested. While these portable camping chairs are not specifically sold as backpacking chairs, their added comfort may make you take them along anyway. To learn more about chairs advertised as backpacking chairs, check out our Backpacking Chair Review.

Crazy Creek backpacking chairs from left to right: Original  Hex 2.0  Hex 2.0 PowerLounger
Crazy Creek backpacking chairs from left to right: Original, Hex 2.0, Hex 2.0 PowerLounger

Special Features


The final decision to make when purchasing a camping chair is whether or not you want extra bells and whistles with your chair. Only two of the portable models we tested had any additional features, though none could hold a beverage, book, or your feet off the ground as you lounge. However, these models, which tended to be smaller in size and therefore lower to the ground, had much easier ground access to be able to place your beverage and other necessities. Nevertheless, some people want to be able to keep things like a phone or keys out of the dirt. Most of the traditional models we tested had at least one cup holder and one storage pocket. Many models had more, for example, the Sport-Brella Recliner came with a detachable footrest, umbrella, bottle opener, and cooler! If you know you want to have at least a few storage features, another affordable option with great storage is the Coleman Oversize Quad Chair with Cooler.

Although the Coleman previously won our Editors' Choice  it didn't make the cut this time around. That said  we still think it's an affordable and versatile option with great storage.
Although the Coleman previously won our Editors' Choice, it didn't make the cut this time around. That said, we still think it's an affordable and versatile option with great storage.


 
 

Follow Us




Unbiased.


You Might Also Like