The Best Winter Boots Review

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Beating the snow: the Sorel Caribou on the lookers right and Best Buy winner Kamik NationPlus on the left.
Credit: Jediah Porter
What are the best winter boots to protect your feet from cold, wet snow? We got our cold feet into seven pairs of the best insulated boots on the market and did a lot of stomping in slush to find out. Anyone who lives, works, or plays in even the most temperate snowy climate needs a pair of waterproof, insulated boots. You may only use them for a couple hours on a few days a year, or spend all day for months at a time in your kicks. In either case, some careful shopping is bound to pay off. After rounding up the top insulated, waterproof models on the market, we ranked them on categories from warmth and water resistance to traction. Read further to see which pair will work best for your lifestyle.

Read the full review below >

Review by: ⋅ Review Editor, OutdoorGearLab

Top Ranked Winter Boots - Men's Displaying 1 - 5 of 7 << Previous | View All | Next >>
Our Ranking #1 #2 #3 #4 #5
Product Name
Bogs Ultra Mid
Bogs Ultra Mid
Read the Review
Baffin Arctic Men
Baffin Arctic Men
Read the Review
Kamik NationPlus
Kamik NationPlus
Read the Review
Sorel Caribou
Sorel Caribou
Read the Review
Baffin Maple
Baffin Maple
Read the Review
Editors' Awards  Editors' Choice Award  Top Pick Award  Best Buy Award     
Street Price Varies $126 - $130
Compare at 4 sellers
Varies $105 - $125
Compare at 3 sellers
Varies $59 - $80
Compare at 2 sellers
$140
Compare at 7 sellers
Varies $84 - $140
Compare at 4 sellers
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Editors' Rating
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User Rating Be the first to rate itBe the first to rate itBe the first to rate itBe the first to rate itBe the first to rate it
Pros Easy to put on, plenty protectiveWarm and comfortableclose fitting and warmClassic look, durable.Low cuff, very warm
Cons Not as warm as someClunky for walkingcompromised water resistanceWide, sloppy fit.Clumsy fit and low cuff
Best Uses Day to day wintertime useSedentary use in very cold climatesday-to-day cold and snowy climate useShort-distance snowy walks.Sedentary work and play in dry, cold climates
Date Reviewed Feb 23, 2014Feb 25, 2014Feb 23, 2014Feb 23, 2014Feb 23, 2014
Weighted Scores Bogs Ultra Mid Baffin Arctic Men Kamik NationPlus Sorel Caribou Baffin Maple
Comfort - 25%
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7
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7
Warmth - 25%
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9
Water Resistance - 20%
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6
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Style - 5%
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8
Traction - 20%
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Ease Of Use - 15%
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Product Specs Bogs Ultra Mid Baffin Arctic Men Kamik NationPlus Sorel Caribou Baffin Maple
Weight (Per Boot, size 9) 2 lb 5 oz 1 lb 15 oz 1 lb 12 oz 2 lb 6 oz 2 lb
Shaft Height (from bottom of sole to top of shaft) 12 in 14.5 in 11 in 11.5 in 8.5 in
Maximum puddle depth before major leaking 9 in 14.5 in 6.5 in 8.5 in 6 in
Lining/Insulation 7mm Neo-Tech⢠Neoprene Thermaplush Synthetic 200g Thinsulate 9mm ThermoPlus⢠felt Thermaplush Synthetic
Upper Neoprene Nylon Suede and rubber Nubuck leather Leather and Nylon
Toe Box Rubber over neoprene Rubber Rubber Vulcanized rubber Rubber
Outsole Rubber Rubber SnowTread Synthetic Rubber AeroTrack Rubber Rubber
Animal products used? No No Yes Yes Yes
Sizes Available 4 to 14 7 to 14 7 to 14 7 to 17 7 to 14
Colors Available Black Black, Camoflage Brown Light Brown, Black, Olive Green, Grey, Dark Brown Black, Brown, Red

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Hands-on Review


  • Review Photos
  • Editors' Choice Winners
  • All Reviewed Products
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Bogs Ultra Mid
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Kamik NationPlus
$80.00
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Columbia Bugaboot Plus II
$120
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Baffin Arctic Men
$145
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79
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Sorel Caribou
$140
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Keen summit County III
$150
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Baffin Maple
$155
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Snow boots epitomize function over form. You might equally dread and eagerly anticipate the conditions that require them. The ultimate choice many consumers make is more often than not a product of what is convenient and available. This nonchalance is a shame. Owning the right pair is a joy. If happy feet make happy campers (or hikers or climbers or skiers), keeping those same feet content and comfortable will make for stoked snowy-climate-residents. While manufacturers are carefully tuning their offerings, very few consumers put much thought into their ultimate selection. We are here to change that. Our professional test team has conducted a full OutdoorGearLab review of a broad and deep cross-section of what the market has to offer. Read on to learn what we have learned about selecting the best pair for your purposes.
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Among the lace-up boots, the Kamik NationPlus boots were the easiest to get on and off. This is notable, given the close fit.
Credit: Jediah Porter

Background Information
Protective winter footwear has been around as long as people have lived in cold climates. In fact, in the higher latitudes, these are simply referred to as "boots"; no qualifier necessary. As a whole, the category encompasses a broad and deep range. You'll find lightly insulated hiking boots at one end of the spectrum, and thick, voluminous footwear designed for hours and days of snowmobile or dogsled transport on the other. Most consumers require something more in the middle of that spectrum. Most of you will use your boots, most of the time, for walking to the car on a snowy morning or for the occasional few hours of sledding. You need a pair of boots that are comfortable, fast and easy to put on, and that protect from cold and wet conditions. These middle-ground applications, encompassing more than 90% of what consumers require, are pretty forgiving conditions. We do not expect our boots to be all that fashionable; they are inherently bulky and clunky. We also do not expect our day-to-day boots to be comfortable for miles of walking. In fact, simply making them loose-fitting, with a little insulation of some sort and some modern materials, extending up over the ankle, is all that is necessary to provide the needed warmth and water resistance. That being said, the subtleties can matter a great deal, and some will want more specialized footwear for cold conditions. In terms of specialized footwear, all the models we tested, for instance, are suitable for general application and for usage in more demanding conditions.

The Types of Winter Boots Available

Pac Boots
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Pac Style boots can be disassembled for drying or replacement of worn liners.
Credit: Jediah Porter
These are "typical" or traditional winter boots. The term "pac" is defined as "a soft, flexible, heelless shoe worn as a liner inside a boot or overshoe." A pac boot, in the modern parlance, is a leather, rubber, textile, or hybrid boot with a removable, insulated liner. Sorel consolidated the category with the introduction of their Caribou model in 1962. The Sorel Caribou is still made, and we tested it in this review. Many other manufacturers have since entered the fray and offer models in this style. Generally, these are affordable, neutral in styling, very warm and waterproof, and comfortable for sedentary use or short walks. The design is inherently loose, and therefore doesn't provide very good walking performance. If you work and play outdoors but don't walk a long ways, you have to consider pac style model. In our test, the Sorel Caribou, Kamik NationPlus, Baffin Arctic, and Baffin Maple represent this style.

Pull On Winter Boots
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Pull-on boots need to be smooth on the inside in order to go on and off easily.
Credit: Jediah Porter
This is your classic "barn-boot" style of footwear and again, this is a broad category. In fact, the whole market is huge and diverse. To narrow things down into these three divisions means some significant "lumping" must occur. The pull-on winter boot category includes any boots that don't have laces nor separate liners and shells. This footwear may be made of rubber, neoprene, textile, leather, or even sheepskin. They are generally convenient, durable, with limited walking performance. Warmth and weather resistance varies depending on materials. We only tested one pair in this style, the Bogs Ultra Mid. In fact, according to the manufacturer, these were "designed to help dairy farmers stay safe and comfy". This style has found far more widespread appeal and application outside of agriculture. These can be comfortable, warm, and convenient. If they are well-shaped and designed, they are excellent for short-term and short-distance use. They generally will not work well for walking long distances or for use in the deepest snow.

Insulated Walking Winter Boots
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Most consumers will use their boots almost exclusively on short trips and for at most an hour or two each day.
Credit: Jediah Porter
In this category, we include any and all models that are a single piece (meaning no removable liner), insulated, and optimized for walking. Basically, the liner, insulation, and outer, protective layer are all sewn and laminated together. This allows the boots to fit closely and comfortably, while remaining lightweight and inexpensive. It also means that they cannot be readily dried without a heated space. In order to fit securely for extended mileage they must be laced. In order to protect from winter weather and ground conditions, they must have a cuff that extends up over the user's ankle. Like all the categories, the amount of insulation may be very basic or quite thick. Generally, however, these models are lightly insulated. There are versions available in this category from traditional outdoor and hiking manufacturers as well as from hunting companies. In either case, design criteria are essentially the same. Consider your options from all the companies and you stack the odds in favor of achieving an excellent fit. It is important to note that, in the opinion and experience of our testing team, these insulated walking boots are excellent for day trip hiking and snowshoeing. If you intend to go out for multiple days, camping in the cold and snow, even if you will not tackle any technical mountaineering, you will be best served by insulated, double-layer mountaineering boots. Single layer boots, whether made for cold weather hiking or climbing, are not suitable for multi-day use because of the difficulty in drying them and the inherent limitations on insulation. The single-layer insulated hiking boots we tested are best for day-trip distance endeavors. In our test, the Columbia Bugaboot II and Keen Summit County III represent the insulated walking boot category.

Application
First of all, narrow down your options by asking yourself if you will, how you use your boots. Even if it is only occasional use, limited to shoveling the sidewalk, walking to the car, taking the dog out, and commuting to the ski resort. We estimate that 90% of consumers fit this description. In this case almost any model will work, but there is bound to be a product that really suits you. Pull-on boots are most convenient, but generally insulate a little less well than Pac-style boots. Pac-style boots are warm, comfortable, and stylistically predictable. You'll fit right in with the ski town community or anywhere in Canada. If choosing a pair for day-to-day applications, you need not spend a great deal of money. While insulated hiking boots and the most beefy of pac-style models will serve you just fine, we think you'll do better to stick to less expensive styles. All the winter boot models we tested, for instance, are plenty durable and will last for years and years of seasonal day-to-day use.

If selecting a pair for day-to-day use, fit them loosely. You want room to wiggle all your toes. Your heels may lift and slide around a bit, but your foot shouldn't slide side to side. Shop carefully, especially if doing so online. Some manufacturers fit and size boots loosely already. Notably, Sorel sizes theirs so you can order your street shoe size and have room for a couple layers of socks, while Kamik brand fits a little more like street shoes. Also in our test, Bogs and Columbia fit narrowly while Baffin and Keen fit wider.

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Most consumers use their boots for just brief transitions between home and office, or in this case, between car and ski boots.
Credit: Dale Apgar
If you will use your boots for more specialized applications, there are two general and divergent directions people go. Some will be looking for boots for extended mileage, while others require boots for sedentary use in very cold climates. These two categories have mutually exclusive design requirements.

First, perhaps you are looking for winter hiking and snowshoeing boots. This footwear for you should fit closer than that for general everyday wear. In order to achieve this close fit, as well as keep weight and bulk manageable, the insulation will be thinner than in day-to-day models. This thinner insulation, however, is ok. Hiking and snowshoeing, with their physical demands, keep your extremities inherently warmer. Just don't count on standing around for long periods of time in cold conditions in your insulated hiking boots.

If you will be standing around for extended periods in the cold, as in fall sports spectating in the upper Midwest or snowmobiling anywhere, check out the more insulating and sophisticated Pac boot designs. You will spend more money, and the boots will be even bulkier, but your feet will thank you. With the greater bulk comes even more compromised walking function, in most cases.

How do Winter Boots Protect you From the Weather?
Regardless of which style you choose or how you will use it, you will count on it to keep your feet as dry and warm as possible. The waterproofing and insulation will work together to keep the elements out.

There are two primary types of insulation in boots, and a couple others that deserve mention.

Neoprene, as in our Editors' Choice winning Bogs Ultra Mid is very durable, great when wet, but doesn't offer the most robust cold protection. Boots insulated with neoprene are excellent in milder cold climates where water is just as threatening as the cold.

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The Bogs Ultra Mid delivers top-of-the-class performance in almost all of our evaluation categories. Water resistance from the rubber and neoprene construction is notably high.
Credit: Jediah Porter

Synthetic "puffy" insulation can also be integrated into boots. This insulation, as compared to neoprene, can be warmer, softer, and less effective in wet conditions. Puffy insulation is most effective when it is given space to "loft up" and capture dead air space. This means that the warmest models are constructed to fit loosely and softly. Walking comfort, however, is best in designs that fit snugly and firmly. Walking performance and insulating value, especially when dealing with puffy insulation, are inherently at odds.

Winter boots are also constructed to insulate with dense felt, sheepskin, and reflective metallic textile. None of these methods are as common as those mentioned above. Felt was historically the standard method of insulating Pac style boots, and was very effective as such, but has become cost prohibitive. Sheepskin is common in more fashionable models, and the reflective linings are usually used in conjunction with other methods.

Protecting your foot from water is accomplished in two different ways. The first method relies on waterproof or water resistant external materials or treatment of the external materials to block water. Secondly, whether the external materials are waterproof or water resistant, or not at all, the manufacturer can add a waterproof/breathable membrane to the lining fabric.

In the second case, where the winter boot is lined with a waterproof/breathable membrane, the user's foot will never get wet from the outside. Unless the lining and membrane become mechanically damaged, the outer materials and the insulation may become soaked, but that water will never reach the wearer's foot. Soaked outer materials will, however, significantly inhibit breathability. Perspiration from your feet will not go through the membrane with cold water immediately to the outside. Your feet will become wet and cold from your own perspiration. Therefore, for truly dry feet, winter boots need to keep the outer materials and insulation dry as well.

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While primarily designed for the coldest conditions, the Baffin Arctic pac-style boots also do well in warmer and sloppier winter weather.
Credit: Jediah Porter

This means that, whether there is a waterproof/breathable lining in the boot or not, the external layers need to keep water out. "Real" leather can be treated at the factory, and periodically by the user, to block water. This blocking may be best described as "water resistance", as even the best leather will eventually saturate and let water through. Synthetic "leather" can be either waterproof or not at all, and must be treated according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Nylon and other textiles can be treated for water resistance, or laminated with an actual waterproof membrane, breathable or not. In footwear, textiles are treated in the former fashion more frequently than the latter. You will need to replace and augment the water resistance of fabric on winter boots. Rubber and some types of neoprene, especially those types used in footwear, are inherently waterproof.

What Makes Winter Boots Comfortable and Easy to Use?
As briefly noted above, walking comfort and insulation value will require inherent trade-offs. Similarly, other comfort and convenience attributes will need to be weighed against each other and against weather protection.
  • Heavily lugged soles grip well on soft snow and mud, but track that material into your house.
  • Soft rubber soles grip well on ice, but wear out more quickly.
  • Squishy insulation is comfortable and warm, but allows the user's foot to slide around while walking.
  • Removable liners dry and replace readily, but make for a more clumsy fit.
  • Thick, padded soles are warm and comfortable, but also make for more clumsy use.
  • Pull-on boots are easy to get on and off, but in most cases do not walk as well as laced boots.
  • The most fashionable footwear is low-profile and leather. Close-fitting, fashionable models aren't as warm as bulkier models, while leather requires regular treatment and care to be water resistant and durable.

Selecting the Right Product
Whether you're walking to your car on the occasional snowy day outside your mid-Atlantic home, snowshoeing to remote summits in the High Sierra, or working 10-hour days on a Wyoming oil field, choosing and using excellent insulated and waterproof footwear will enhance your comfort and safety. We ranked each winter boot on comfort and fit, warmth, water resistance, style, traction, and ease of use to accurately compare the performance across the board. Generally, most consumers will do well with any pair that insulate, fit, and suit your style tastes.

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Typical winter outdoor tasks like cleaning off your car, walking to the mailbox, and getting groceries require special footwear when the snow gets deeper than an inch or two.
Credit: Mike Phillips

Criteria for Evaluation
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Our 2014 tested selection of winter boots. From L to R: Bogs, Baffin Arctic, Columbia, Kamik, Baffin Maple, Sorel, Keen.
Credit: Jediah Porter

Fit and Comfort
The user's tactile experience with his footwear is highly subjective. Basically, each foot and boot combination will differ from another. People have different shaped feet and each boot company uses a different "last", or form, around which it builds its boots. There is no substitute for trying on your footwear. Thankfully, even most internet retailers offer some sort of option for trying footwear out, and many easy generalizations can be made. We compared the fit and comfort of all the winter boots we tested, and found the Bogs Ultra Mid to be the most plush and wearable. We note in each review how wide or narrow the fit is overall, as well as any problem areas in the seams or construction. The Keen Summit County III and Sorel Caribou are excellent for those with wider feet, while the Bogs and Kamik are better suited to slender feet.

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Many will purchase insulated boots for ante- and apres-ski. In this case, look for models that go on and off easy, look alright, and keep the snow and cold out, whether worn with street clothes or ski pants.
Credit: McKenzie Long

Warmth
All of the winter boots we tested are insulated and that insulation can be quantified. Insulation is measured either by its thickness in millimeters, or by the weight of a square meter of the sheeted synthetic "puffy" insulation". This allows for a cursory comparison of the insulation value of the boots. However, the wearer's warmth experience also relies on the snugness and overall fit. Closer fitting and tight models restrict circulation, leaving the toes numb. No matter how much insulation there is, if your heart can't push warm blood into your feet, they will get cold. We recommend purchasing boots with enough room for your toes to wiggle in the front. Our measure of warmth is based on lengthy and comparative testing. We wore boots, different ones on each foot at times, in a variety of conditions and temperatures. From this testing, we were able to generalize their overall and relative warmth. We found that the high, bulky, and loose fitting Baffin Arctic was the warmest, while the sleek and eminently walk-able Columbia Bugaboot II was the least insulating. This points to the inherent tradeoffs in footwear design; in the case of warm winter boots, they'll either be more insulating and less walkable, or more dextrous and less insulating. You can't have it both ways.

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Our Top Pick winning Baffin Arctic brings sophisticated materials to the classic 2-part "pac boot" style. This is the Arctic with the liner removed.
Credit: Jediah Porter

Water Resistance
Cold climates are often inherently wet climates. Whether the water is liquid or frozen, it is often there to give you trouble. Winter boots must deal with this. Manufacturers take a variety of tracks to weatherproof your footwear. Some, like the Bogs Mid, are fully waterproof rubber boots. Others use molded rubber at the bottom, sewn and sealed to leather or textile uppers. Finally, some are constructed of panels of leather and textile just like hiking boots, with the waterproofing coming from a combination of external treatment and inner lining membranes.

In our test, none ever let actual water through to the feet. The Bogs Mid was the most visibly and durably waterproof. The Bogs, as well as most of the models in our test, put the bulk of their waterproofing material and technology on the exterior of the boots. Whether this is done with rubber, treated leather, or waterproof nylon, waterproofing the exterior keeps the insulation free of external water. Internal perspiration may dampen or even soak the insulation and liner materials. Regardless of how it gets wet, moisture in the insulation and liners can compromise their heat-retention. You get colder in wet boots. It works the other way as well: Less insulating boots feel wetter as your perspiration gets cold.

Notably, the Keen Summit County III is the only model in our test with a waterproof/breathable membrane. The Keen kept all external moisture away from the foot. However, the membrane is located essentially right next to the wearer's foot. This means that the outer leather and insulation can, and did, get soaked with water. This compromises breathability and insulation value, both leading to the feeling of cold, damp feet. Consult our extensive description of waterproof/breathable technology and limitations in our Hardshell Buying Advice article.

Finally, water resistance scores must reflect the fact that winter boots are only as waterproof as they are high. Essentially, each one can leak over the top, and some models are higher than others.

Style
Style matters. You'll wear these boots to the office, to the bar, to the ski area, and out in your front driveway. You want subtle style and inconspicuous colors. Consider whether you'll wear your pants inside the cuffs, over the top, or if you will want to mix and match these styles. None of the test models we tested were stylistically offensive. Some bring a more classic look, while others blend right in with any non-insulated hiking boots. In each individual review we expand on the look of each model, but we can recommend the Kamik NationPlus and its classic look or the Columbia Bugaboot II for it's streamlined and sleek hiking boot appearance.

Traction
Just like cold climates are wet climates, cold and wet climates offer slippery footing. There are inherent limitations to the grip of rubber soled footwear, though some do better than others. In super icy conditions consider an aftermarket metal-spiked traction aid. Our testing revealed some subtle differences in traction. The relatively smooth soles of the Bogs Mid don't grip as well on soft snow as the deep lugs of the Sorel Caribou. The hiking specific Keen and Columbia have lower-profile soles for better grip on a variety of surfaces, while the Baffin models, designed for ultra cold, each have deep and sharp-edged lugs that grab well on loose and packed snow.

Ease of Use
Whether you're slipping your boots on and off for the short drive to the ski area or lacing them up for a long snowshoe hike, you want kicks that are easy to get in and out of. They should dry readily and allow you to walk smoothly and confidently. In some applications you will want to lace up for more active endeavors or in other cases leave them loose and ready for slip-on, slip-off usage. We considered all of these criteria in our assessment of ease of use. Especially given their performance, the Bogs Ultra Mid was by far the easiest to use. They slip on and off easily and absorb virtually no water if completely submerged. The modular pac styles, like the Baffin Maple and Sorel Caribou, are a little trickier to get on and off, but the removable liners can be dried readily.

Accessories
In the inevitable situation that your boots do get wet on the inside, whether from snow or from sweat, a good boot drier can really make the difference. The TurboDry from DryGuy circulates warm dry air directly into the toe box to make sure the boot dries out completely.

When walking or hiking on snow sometimes you need a little extra traction. Kahtoola MICROspikes are easy to slip on over boots and give you very secure footing, even on snow and ice.

Editors' Choice Award: Bogs Ultra Mid
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Most at home in sloppy conditions, the Bogs Mid Ultra proved to be a solid all-around performer.
Credit: Jediah Porter
The top-scoring winter boot in our test was the Bogs Ultra Mid. Interestingly, this is also the most unique model we examined. No other footwear we tested represented the slip-on "barn boot" style. However, Bogs executes this simple construction in impeccable fashion. The fit is close, and the lining is smooth. They go on easy and stay put for at least a moderate amount of walking. If your feet are narrow-to-average in volume, the fit is perfect. If you have wider feet, these will not work as well for you. The neoprene insulation and rubber coating combine to provide simple and waterproof protection from the cold that doesn't absorb water at all. This means that the Ultra Mid, even after a thorough soaking, will dry readily and quickly.

Best Buy Award: Kamik NationPlus
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The Kamik NationPlus was an easy choice for our Best Buy award.
Credit: Jediah Porter
Among all the winter boots we evaluated, for all of our testers the Kamik NationPlus inspired the most favorable first impression. The fit is comfortable, light, and cushy. Our extended testing only improved that first impression. The warmth and water resistance scores come out right in the middle, while the NationPlus model has the greatest walking comfort of all the Pac style models in our test. Finally, they are the least expensive in our test, by far. High performance and low price makes them an easy choice for our Best Buy award. Unique in our test, the NationPlus Kamiks also come in a wide fit, referred to as the NationWide model. This is an excellent attribute, as Pac style models generally suffer from overly sloppy fit in order for one boot model to accommodate various foot shapes.

Top Pick Award for Working in Extreme Cold: Baffin Arctic
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The Baffin Arctic is a Top Pick for its cold-weather, long term protection value.
Credit: Jediah Porter
The Baffin Arctic Men is the most specialized winter boot in our test. It's high-top and highly insulating construction is far from the most versatile. However, it is very warm and comfortable for sedentary use in very cold climates. If you work or play in the northern latitudes, consider the Baffin Arctic. It will keep you warm and dry. You can also remove the liner for overnight drying and for replacement as it wears out.

Top Pick Award for Winter Hiking: Columbia Bugaboot Plus II
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Chosen for its hiking performance, the Columbia Bugaboot Plus II won one of our Top Pick awards.
Credit: Jediah Porter
Especially as compared to its closest competitor in our test, the Columbia Bugaboot Plus II is an excellent insulated hiking boot. Whether you are hiking miles and miles in your November elk hunting grounds, or snowshoeing multiple Vermont summits each weekend, the Columbia will serve you well. It fits close and clean, like a good hiking boot should be, but Columbia adds in solid waterproofness and light insulation.

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Sorel Caribou, in action. Slushy, sloppy conditions are no match for the rubber lower section of the Caribou.
Credit: Jediah Porter

How We Test

We wore these winter boots day-in and day-out during every day winter life around Mammoth Lakes, CA. We also wore them on cold desert nights around the Mountain West. Our testing team included hiking guides, ice climbers, and skiers. We evaluated each model during long days of walking, as well as during short forays around town and to and from the ski resort. In order to assess waterproofness and relative warmth, we spent hours at a time alternating between these winter boots in slushy cold conditions. Finally, we had multiple people try on all of the boots and give their impressions of the comparative fit and style.

Again, in the end, almost any product on the market will serve most consumers. Most consumers will need to choose between pull-on or Pac style, then choose a fit, price-point, and look that suits you. Those of you looking for greater performance will do well to consider either insulated hiking boots for high mileage, or more serious Pac boots for coldest conditions. Happy shopping.

Jediah Porter
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