How to Choose the Best Winter Boots for Women

From left to right: Ugg Adirondack II  Sorel Tofino II  Northside Kathmandu  Sorel Joan of Arctic  The North Face Shellista II Mid  Kamik Momentum  Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry  Columbia Minx-Mid II.
Article By:
Amber King
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Saturday

A good pair of winter boots can help make winter exponentially better. Whether you shovel feet upon feet of snow every winter or you spend time outside in cold temperatures, we're here to help you choose the footwear that will best suit your needs. In this article, we will discuss such topics as Fashion vs. Function, Tall vs. Short Boots, and Performance & Comfort. Throughout each of these sections, we will touch on the different types of products available. You can read more about how each of these models compared in our head-to-head tests by reading our full review.

Most of the pieces in this review are geared more for around town use and winter hiking, rather than extreme technical activities. If you are in the market for a boot that is crampon-compatible, be sure to click over to The Best Mountaineering Boots for Women Review.

Types of Women's Winter Boots


Through this review, we tested a gauntlet of different winter boots with a variety of different functions. To help you navigate the options out there, we have divided the boots that we've tested into three distinct categories. Each differing a little in design and function. The three categories we cover are the 'Pac boot, the 'hiking boot', and the traditional 'snow boot'. Most of the boots we tested fit under the Pac boot category, so we recommend you start your search there.

These boots are best for those looking for decent traction, warmth, and protection for walking around town. This type of boots offers a little more performance than you'd expect from a traditional snow boot. However, if you plan on playing a little harder than a simple walk around town - say - snowshoeing or hiking, then an active hiker may be what you're looking for. If you're simply just looking for a basic boot that will keep you warm while building snowmen and walking around town, then simply skip the rest and check out 'snow boots'.

Pac Boots


If you're not really sure what to get, this category is a good place to start! Of all the boots tested, we learned that Pac boots are more versatile and not as specialized as the other two categories. Pac boots feature a well-defined thick rubber shell and an upper typically constructed of either a waterproof or water-resistant textile. These boots are best for wearing around town, light hiking and walking to work. Most Pac boots that we tested feature decent tread patterns and some level of water and weather resistance. Some may have removable liners while others do not. Many of our testers loved removable liners as we could pull them out and allow the boots to dry faster than those without! In addition, these boots are typically more waterproof than regular snow boots. That said, they are not quite as technical or well fitted as active hiking boots.

A look at a few different Pac boots in this review. From top left to right: UGG Adirondack II  Kamik Momentum  Sorel Joan of Arctic. From bottom left to right: Northside Kathmandu  The North Face Shellista II Mid  Sorel Tofino II.
A look at a few different Pac boots in this review. From top left to right: UGG Adirondack II, Kamik Momentum, Sorel Joan of Arctic. From bottom left to right: Northside Kathmandu, The North Face Shellista II Mid, Sorel Tofino II.

The downside of most Pac Boots is the fit and breathability. The fit is typically a little more 'floppier' than you'd find with an active hiker. The lacing systems aren't as technical and are designed to simply be pulled on and kicked off. In addition, they aren't very breathable. When taking a few pairs of Pac boots out on a hike, we learned that our feet sweat much more and the boots kept the moisture in. This resulted in cold toes!! As a result, they are better for wearing for short periods of time whilst not so "active". Feel free to wear them to the store or while walking to work, but don't plan on taking them on any steep hikes. Most boots that we reviewed fit into this category. A few examples include the Sorel Joan or Arctic, Sorel Tofino II, and the Northside Kathmandu Boot.

Active Hiking Boots


If you're in the market for a boot with ankle support and deep tread, then an active winter hiking boot may be what you need! These boots are best for ladies who plan on hiking, walking, or snowshoeing for hours in the snow.

Hiking in the backcountry is best partnered with an active hiker like the Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry!
Hiking in the backcountry is best partnered with an active hiker like the Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry!

Unlike Pac and snow boots, they feature snug lacing systems, a rigid upper, and a more precise fit which provides more stability. The rigidity of the boots also allows you to kick steps into the snowside if needed. Active winter hiking boots also feature a breathable liner that wicks away moisture that keeps feet warm all day long. In addition, the tread is deep - really deep. So it grips the snow better than most other boots tested. We also noted that the rubber is typically softer, grabbing rocks as well as snow. The only downside is they typically lack style and take more time to get on and off. If you're in the market for an active winter hiker, check out our Top Pick for Winter Hiking - the technical Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry. Or, if you're in search of a cross between Pac boot that can go off-trail, check out our Editors' Choice winner, The North Face Shellista II Mid.

Looking to tackle snowy slopes? Look for a boot with burly tread and a breathable construct!
Looking to tackle snowy slopes? Look for a boot with burly tread and a breathable construct!

Snow Boots


A snow boot is what most people think of when buying boots for kids. They feature a water-resistant upper and some kind of thinner rubber outsole that may not be as durable or weather-resistant as Pac boots. They are best for just walking around town but don't offer much in the way of significant weather protection over a long period of time. In addition, the level of traction isn't typically as good as other types of boots. They are also typically lighter. The only snow boot in this review is the Columbia Minx-Mid II. For a snowboot, this is truly top the line, but it doesn't offer nearly as much weather protection as others tested in this review, even though it claims to be waterproof. So if you're in the market for a boot that a little less expensive, and you simply need it to just get around town, with some minor puddle jumping, this may be a great choice!

The Columbia Minx-Mid II is a lightweight option with great traction and a cute  no-frills design. Wear it while walking to work  or out on the town with friends during the cold months of the year!
The Columbia Minx-Mid II is a lightweight option with great traction and a cute, no-frills design. Wear it while walking to work, or out on the town with friends during the cold months of the year!

Fashion vs. Function


Footwear plays a major role in a person's overall look. Since many women purchase winter boots for use around town, we're going to start off with a debate about fashion vs. function. As with most products, it is important to first consider how you plan to use your boots and what the weather in your region is like. If you live in an extremely cold and snowy area, it may be critical to purchase a tall, burly boot like the Sorel Joan of Arctic that has super warm insulation. On the other hand, if you are looking specifically for a winter hiker, the Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry will certainly do the trick. In the case of a hiking boot, style is probably not at the top of your priority list; however, if you are on the hunt for a boot for general around town use, it is often important to balance function with style.

Britt gets ready for a day of testing out on the town! Here she wears both the Northside Kathmandu and the Sorel Joan of Arctic in this winter blizzard.
Britt gets ready for a day of testing out on the town! Here she wears both the Northside Kathmandu and the Sorel Joan of Arctic in this winter blizzard.

Luckily, we tested a number of products that offer just that balance. The Sorel Joan of Arctic was the warmest in our review, but it's also one of the most stylish according to our social media poll of over 50 women! However, this bulky boot is not very comfortable and we don't recommend it for long walks in town. On the other hand, the Editors' Choice winner, The North Face Shellista II Mid is comfortable to walk in and is cute for around town use, but it isn't as warm as some of its competitors.

Shoveling snow and battling out winter storms with our Top Pick for Severe Weather- the Sorel Joan of Arctic. An obvious pick on days like these due to its rugged construction and great weather protection!
Shoveling snow and battling out winter storms with our Top Pick for Severe Weather- the Sorel Joan of Arctic. An obvious pick on days like these due to its rugged construction and great weather protection!

When deciding on fashion and function, it is important to reflect on how you will actually use your winter boots; for example, if you will be driving to work and then bolting quickly indoors again, then you can probably get away with sacrificing on warmth.

Additionally, we reviewed several pieces that performed well while hiking and still earned decent scores in our style metric. The UGG Adirondack II was one such model. This boot offers a fair amount of water resistance and warmth, and it is comfortable on moderate hikes. The North Face Shellista Mid II was similarly versatile in its performance and style. Alternatively, if you are simply seeking out a fashion boot and are not concerned with its performance, a piece like the Northside Kathmandu is a cute option that would work well in dry, mild winter climates.

The Ugg Adirondack II is quite versatile. Take it out on the town  or on local wintery trails that are packed down.
The Ugg Adirondack II is quite versatile. Take it out on the town, or on local wintery trails that are packed down.

Once you've determined how you want to balance function with style, be sure to consider your personal look. In this review, we tested many winter boots with faux fur and several without. Figuring out whether or not you like the faux fur look is important since it can be challenging to find winter boots without it. Keep in mind that boots with faux fur can somewhat limit versatility. On cool days in late fall, our testers didn't feel ready to bring out the fur just yet; instead, they preferred to wait until it was a little colder and later in the season. Finally, remember to just be yourself!

Tall vs. Short Boots


In this review, we tested only two boots whose shafts measured less than 10 inches (from the ground to the top of the shaft) and seven boots that were taller than 10 inches. There are pros and cons to both of these designs; let's break it down. The most obvious benefit of taller boots is they offer additional protection from rain and deep snow and they provide extra warmth up the calves. Even the tall boots that didn't do too well in our puddle test proved to be essential when schlepping through snow drifts.

Simply put, tall boots keep snow from caking onto your pants and melting as soon as you go indoors.

On the other hand, most of the tall boots we tested were not suitable for hiking (with the exception of The North Face Shellista Mid II). They are typically more difficult to take on and off and don't offer the mobility of boots like the Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry that are designed specifically for winter hiking. In fact, we were able to hike in three of the five pairs of short boots in our review. While they did not provide as much protection from the snow, many of them still offered significant water resistance in puddles and slush. Moreover, if you live in a region that only gets a few inches of snow at a time, short boots will almost certainly provide all the snow protection that you would need. But, if you do expect snow and you do decide on a shorter boot, be sure to opt for one that has a shaft that cinches closed, or has the option to flip up into a taller boot like the Ugg Adirondack II.

Picking a boot with decent traction is a must have when considering all the elements that winter can throw at ya! Here we test the North Face Shellista II Mid (our Editor's Choice) that did a great job in most metrics.
Picking a boot with decent traction is a must have when considering all the elements that winter can throw at ya! Here we test the North Face Shellista II Mid (our Editor's Choice) that did a great job in most metrics.

We found it more difficult to tuck our pants into the short boots in our review (even skinny jeans bunched up a bit with some of the short boots)…you could also say we found it easier to wear our pants on the outside of our short boots, depending on which way you want to look at it. In wet conditions, tucking your pants in can keep them dry; however not everyone likes this look. One final consideration is that short boots (especially the ones we tested without faux fur) are a bit easier to wear in late fall and early spring when you may not want a huge winter boot.

The UGG Adirondack II offers a unique option! Choose to wear this boot with the cuff rolled down  or rolled up. Both offer different styles and comfort options.
The UGG Adirondack II offers a unique option! Choose to wear this boot with the cuff rolled down, or rolled up. Both offer different styles and comfort options.

Can't decide what height winter boot you want? One unique boot that we tested was the UGG Adirondack II, which is a short boot with a cuff able suede shaft that can be worn up or down: roll it down and you have an 8.25-inch shaft with a fluffy sheepskin cuff or roll it up and you have a 10-inch shaft that provides extra protection from the snow.

Fur or no fur?


We realize that after talking with many outdoorsy women that faux-fur is a very personal topic. Some women love the looks, while others think its atrocious. Take some time to figure out what your tastes are, because this could limit your decisions, or expand the possibilities in winter boot selection. In addition to personal preference, there are some basic pros and cons for faux-fur boots. First, a faux fur collar provides a great seal at the top of the boot that keeps heat in, and pesky debris out.

That said, some of our testers noticed that after long days trudging snow, the snow would melt and eventually, seep down the shaft of the boot. Second, many of our tester that wore a flared pant found it easier to wear this type of boot over top of their pants, given the large hole at the top. However, those who prefer to wear boots under the pant, can't have that versatility with this type of boot. Using this information, try to figure out if you'd prefer faux fur or not. If you love it, but sure to check out the Sorel Joan of Arctic and Northside Kathmandu boot. However, if you're on the fence, be sure to look at all your options in this review by visiting The Best Winter Boots for Women article.

A look at shaft height and style among the faux-fur options. From left to right: Northside Kathmandu  Sorel Tofino II  Sorel Joan of Arctic (Top Pick for Severe Weather). We think the Sorel Tofino II is the cutest and most feminine  while the Joan of Arctic offers the 'woodiest' look of them all.
A look at shaft height and style among the faux-fur options. From left to right: Northside Kathmandu, Sorel Tofino II, Sorel Joan of Arctic (Top Pick for Severe Weather). We think the Sorel Tofino II is the cutest and most feminine, while the Joan of Arctic offers the 'woodiest' look of them all.

Performance & Comfort


Once you've narrowed down how you're going to balance out fashion and function, and you've decided on whether tall or short boots are going to better suit your needs, you should consider what sort of performance and comfort you expect out of your boots. Above, we touched on performance, which includes such characteristics as water resistance and warmth, but let's talk a little more about it here.

When considering performance and comfort  determine what kind of conditions you'll be primarily exposed to. Here we test the limits of our womens winter boots by explosing to a 'slush test'!
When considering performance and comfort, determine what kind of conditions you'll be primarily exposed to. Here we test the limits of our womens winter boots by explosing to a 'slush test'!

Performance is directly related to construction. Boot warmth depends upon the insulation used, the material and thickness of the outsole, and the design of the footbed. Factors like shaft height and the seal at the top of the shaft also play a critical role in overall warmth. We found that boots (like the Sorel Joan of Arctic) that had a little more dead space in the toe box warmed up more effectively than boots with a very narrow profile. Interestingly, the Sorel Tofino only has 100 grams of insulation; however, it was warmer than the Northside Kathmandu, which has 200 grams of insulation. This could be partially due to the Kathmandu's very thin sole. We found that the thick sole on boots like the Vasque Pow Pow II Ultradry and the Kamik Momentum provide quite a bit of extra insulation. Be sure to check out our individual reviews of each product, where we go into depth on how each boot compares in warmth.

If you're going to be wearing your winter boots multiple days in a row, it may be beneficial to look for a product with a removable liner (like the Sorel Joan of Arctic) or at least a removable insole. This will allow the boot to dry faster if it gets wet inside from puddles, precipitation, or sweat.


A boot with a fur lining is always more comfortable than those without. The Sorel Tofino II is a comfortable boot that offers great protection from the elements. However  the shaft of the boot is rigid and can pinch in odd places.
A boot with a fur lining is always more comfortable than those without. The Sorel Tofino II is a comfortable boot that offers great protection from the elements. However, the shaft of the boot is rigid and can pinch in odd places.

Construction also affects water resistance. All the pieces that we tested were waterproof to some extent, but we found that several pieces had designs that decreased their water resistance scores. If you live in an area that gets lots of winter precipitation, you should be cautious about purchasing boots like the Northside Kathmandu or the UGGs, which both allow water to seep in through their seams.

Over the long term, materials like suede may need to be refinished with a waterproof treatment, while rubber will remain water resistant over the life of the product. Additionally, we really liked how the faux fur cuffs (and the UGG's sheepskin cuff) contributed to water resistance. These features not only sealed in warmth, but also caught snow and rain, keeping it from making its way down into the boot.

We also want to talk about how comfort and coziness should play into your decision. There may be no better time to pamper your feet than in winter. Oftentimes women sacrifice comfort for style…and this is especially true in footwear. Our testers think that snow and cold temperatures are the perfect excuse to hang up your uncomfortable heels or flats and slip into something that's still stylish, but just more comfortable. If you plan to hike or walk significant distances in your boots, it's important to really think about comfort. While some of the pieces that we reviewed have very supportive footbeds (like The North Face Shellista - our Editors' Choice winner), others (like the Sorel Joan of Arctic) completely fell short in our comfort metric. In the end, you will need to prioritize which qualities are most important to you before choosing the boot that is just right for you.

We jump for joy! The North Face Shellista II Mid provides an uber-supportive and absorbant footbed that makes jumping off of things feel like nothing!
We jump for joy! The North Face Shellista II Mid provides an uber-supportive and absorbant footbed that makes jumping off of things feel like nothing!

Want to make your feet extra happy? Consider investing in winter boots that are super cozy. The UGG Adirondack II and the Northside Kathmandu may just alter your definition of coziness. Both of these boots have plush inner linings that will make your feet feel ultra snuggly.

The interior is lined with plush sheepskin fur that keeps your feet cozy and warm. Here we get ready for our river tests while examining the interior of the boot.
The interior is lined with plush sheepskin fur that keeps your feet cozy and warm. Here we get ready for our river tests while examining the interior of the boot.

Finally, let's talk briefly about purchasing boots made from animal products. We reviewed several models that do not have any leather or sheepskin, including the Columbia Minx-Mid II Omni-Heat and the Kamik Momentum. However, all the other pieces use leather, suede, or nubuck materials. Additionally, the UGG Australia Adirondack II incorporates sheepskin. In this case, UGG uses only sheepskin that is a byproduct of the meat industry. For more discussion on this topic check out our individual review of this product.

Fit


In our individual reviews, we also talk about how each piece fits. Some of the boots that we tested have more narrow soles and toe boxes, while others have airy toe boxes and run slightly too big. Furthermore, some models (like The North Face Shellista II Mid) have supportive footbeds, but their insoles may or may not be the perfect fit for *your* foot. When fitting your boots, make sure they aren't too tight; a little bit of dead space in your boot can promote foot warmth and allow you to layer on thick, cozy wool socks. Be sure to peruse the 'Style & Fit' section of our individual reviews to see if the boot that you're considering runs small, large, or just right.

Amber King
About the Author
Amber hails from cold North of Canada. After finishing up her B.Sc and B.Ed in 2009, she opted for a transient life exploring the mountains and deserts of the US on foot and rock. She is an avid rock climber, trail runner, hiker, and split boarder. When she's not tromping around in the woods, you can find her planning experiential science-based trips as a middle and high school teacher in the foothills of the San Juan mountains

 
 

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