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ARVA Evo5 Review

An intuitive beacon with a great price
ARVA Evo5
Photo: Backcountry
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Price:  $320 List | $279.99 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Easy to use interface, low profile design, excellent multiple burial design and features
Cons:  Takes practice in the bracketing stage of the search, beacon stays on if you don't hit the flag button when you turn it off
Manufacturer:   Arva
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Dec 18, 2020
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#13 of 14
  • Range - 15% 6
  • Speed - 20% 7
  • Single victim search - 20% 8
  • Fine search - 15% 9
  • Multiple Burials - 15% 8
  • Features - 15% 7

Our Verdict

Arva's most popular beacon has been updated again. The newest version of the Arva Evo5 is one of the slimmest triple antenna beacons on the market. Its interface is more intuitive than previous versions and quite easy to operate. The Evo5 has reliable and easy-to-understand multiple burial functions and is one of the most straightforward models to use. It barely missed out on an award but boasts decent range and a more intuitive multiple burial function.

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ARVA Evo5
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ARVA Evo5
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  
Price $279.99 at Amazon
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Pros Easy to use interface, low profile design, excellent multiple burial design and featuresSuper fast processor, differentiates between beacons fantastically during multiple burials, best range in this review, best model for multiple and pro-level examinationsEasy to use, many features, Bluetooth and smartphone based app, good range, fast processor, best battery life in our review, excellent multiple burial and flagging featuresVery fast processor, crushes in the fine search, easy to use, light and compact (great for beacon-in-pocket users), low stress soundsVery fast processor, excellent range, easy-to-use, comfortable to carry, top-notch multiple burial capabilities with excellent signal lock and marking/flagging functions
Cons Takes practice in the bracketing stage of the search, beacon stays on if you don't hit the flag button when you turn it offExpensive, more complicated than other models, okay but not the best for newer or less practiced usersBattery life is only displayed in thirds and not a percentage, some force required to toggle switches, can be chunky feeling if carrying in a pant's pocketDisplay screen is just okay, multiple burial function un-suppresses the last marked beacon in only 1 min, leading to confusion and wasting time, can only mark one signalNot as user friendly in the bracketing stage as other models, sometimes tells user to keep the orientation earlier than we would like during the fine search
Bottom Line An easy-to-use interface and host of awesome features make it well suited for a wide range of usersPerfect for pros or advanced users, this model is one of the best performing products in every categoryA high-end beacon that is packed full of features, with an interface that is easy to use for the less experiencedA fantastic all-around model that combines ease of use in a smaller than average packageHas better range and superior multiple burial capabilities while still being fairly quick in the fine search
Rating Categories ARVA Evo5 Mammut Barryvox S Black Diamond Guide BT Backcountry Access Tracker3 Mammut Barryvox
Range (15%)
6
10
9
8
10
Speed (20%)
7
9
9
10
9
Single Victim Search (20%)
8
9
9
10
9
Fine Search (15%)
9
9
9
10
8
Multiple Burials (15%)
8
10
9
8
9
Features (15%)
7
10
10
8
7
Specs ARVA Evo5 Mammut Barryvox S Black Diamond... Backcountry Access... Mammut Barryvox
Weight 150g / 5.2 oz 210g / 7.4 oz 210 g / 7.4 oz 215g/ 7.6 oz 210g / 7.4 oz
Number of Antennae 3 3 3 3 3
Manufacturer's Range 40 meters 70 - 95 meters 60 meters 50 meters 70 meters
Flagging Feature? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Battery Life (send) 200 hours 300 hours 400 hours 250 hours 300 hours
Digital/Analogue Digital Both Both Digital Digital

Our Analysis and Test Results

One of the better-priced triple antenna beacons on the market, the Evo5 is an easy-to-use beacon that is one of the lowest profile models on the market. We appreciated how easy the Evo5's interface was; one of its drawbacks was it took a little more practice to dial in the fine search and bracketing portion of the search (search and bracketing under four meters).

Performance Comparison


The Evo5 is an extremely intuitive beacon with a bunch of sweet...
The Evo5 is an extremely intuitive beacon with a bunch of sweet features. One drawback is it takes a little more practice in the fine search and bracketing stages than other models. Pocket wearing users will love its tiny profile; it's unquestionably one of the best possible beacons for the price.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Range


Arva reports a 50meter range/search strip width. However, during our repeated testing, we did not pick up a signal that far away. Instead, our findings with the signal acquisition were more like 45-48 meters away — never once did we hit 50 meters. While there are models with longer ranges, we didn't find the maximum played nearly any role in speeding up overall rescue times; this is because most people are taught to use a 40 meter search strip in their avalanche courses. While some beacons have slightly wider search strip widths, most people simply play it safe (which is a good thing) and stick with 40 meters.

This beacon scored above average for its speed at finding a single...
This beacon scored above average for its speed at finding a single buried signal, regardless of user ability. It features a fairly intuitive design and slightly-faster-than-average processor, along with five directional arrows that can be used in combination to help its user stay on the flux line.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Ease of Finding a Single Victim and Speed


Moving the Evo5 from Send to Search is super easy; you just press the button at the top of the slider bar and pull it down from Search to Send. Once our testers acquired a signal, the Evo5 did an excellent job through the "coarse search" and kept us on the flux line very efficiently, thanks to its audible tones and directional arrows. Further than 10 meters from the victim, and we never felt like we truly had to slow down with this beacon.

One feature that can help newer users is the "turn around" icon that becomes illuminated when the rescuer has gone too far. While it should be evident when the numbers are getting bigger, panic or lack of practice could lead people to travel in the wrong direction. If traveling in the wrong direction for more than five meters, the turn-around notification flashes in the lower right corner of the screen.

We liked a lot of things about this beacon; however, the fact that...
We liked a lot of things about this beacon; however, the fact that its directional arrows disappear at three meters instead of two meant it took a little more practice with newer users while in the fine search/bracketing stage of the search. Below three meters, it shows arrows pointing in all directions (ass seen in the photo), as well as the distance, to help cue the user to start bracketing.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Ease of Use in Fine Search


Once we were 10 meters away and we moved the beacon to the surface of the snow (as you should with all beacons), the Evo5's directional arrows and changing audible tones continued to be intuitive and easy to follow. During the final stage of our beacon search, both moving into and starting to bracket portions of the search, we had to be slightly more thoughtful and move slightly slower than with the fastest models in our review. As the Evo5's directional arrows disappear at three meters — instead of the previously listed beacons two meters — we had to make sure that we were moving between three and five meters with care. All of our testers noted that compared to some in our review, it took more effort to come in directly over the buried signal.

We were impressed with the multiple burial function, especially...
We were impressed with the multiple burial function, especially considering the price. It rarely missed flagging two closely buried beacons and labeled them clearly on its screen. You can see in the bottom left this model sees three buried signals and it has flagged one, as indicated by the "flag" near the furthest left "person".
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Multiple Burials


When multiple signals are being picked up, the Evo5 has multiple burial victim icons displayed on the bottom of the screen with 1, 2, or 3 people-like icons — there is an additional + if it is picking up more than three burials. Once you wish to flag/mark/suppress the signal of the closest beacon, simply press the button down. It will display OK and then give you the distance to the next closest beacon; a small Flag next to the person icon (at the bottom of the screen) will let you know it happened. We found this model flagging function was reliable and could flag beacons, even with a decent amount of overlap reliable from three meters away.

Similar to the BCA Tracker S and the BCA Tracker3, the Evo5 is easy to jump between signals when in multiple burial situations. This makes it better for concentric circle and micro strip-searching techniques, but it means you need to pay closer attention if you happen to have two people very close together (sub two meters).

The Evo5 had a group check mode that can be used to help perform a...
The Evo5 had a group check mode that can be used to help perform a function check, which should be performed before every backcountry outing. It jumped between signals and was nice for checking a group bigger than around five people, where there was a lot more signal overlap.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Features


The Evo5 features a "group check" mode to assist the user; this allows them to efficiently facilitate a function check — something that should be done with any beacon every time you head out into the backcountry.

Photo: Ian Nicholson

To access this function, simply wait until after the beacon has displayed battery life; the only thing it starts displaying is a flashing group check. To activate this mode, hold down the "flag" button while in group check. In this mode, the beacon's max range is three meters and gives distance numbers and audible sounds to let you know it is picking each person up.

The Evo5 (red, second from the left) is one of the smallest beacons...
The Evo5 (red, second from the left) is one of the smallest beacons on the market, with only the Pieps Micro BT being smaller (furthest left). This made it a favorite for people who prefer to carry their beacon in a zippered pants pocket. The other two beacons in this photo are the Tracker3 and the Tracker S, which round out the lowest profile beacons currently on the market - both of which are larger than the Evo5.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Value


The Evo5 is one of the better-priced beacons on the market. While it was a contender for our high value award, it lost out to the Backcountry Access Tracker S, which was just a little faster, consistently offered better precision in the bracketing stage, and was a little cheaper. The Evo5 did have its advantages — it offered slightly better range and an easier-to-use flagging/marking function, especially if there were more than two signals.

One of the best beacons for the money, we love the Evo5.
One of the best beacons for the money, we love the Evo5.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Conclusion


The Arva Evo5 is an intuitive, simple-to-use beacon. We liked the flagging/marking function, and it comes in at a strong price point. It lost out on the award to the BCA Tracker S, which didn't have as easy to understand multiple burials or as good of a range. It was also faster and consistently more precise in the bracketing stage. It remains a solid, well-rounded beacon that will perform well for beginners and seasoned backcountry travelers.

Ian Nicholson