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Inov-8 Roclite 290 Review

Inov-8 Roclite 290
Top Pick Award
Price:   $120 List | $87.71 at Amazon
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Pros:  The best traction, stable and sensitive, great fit for the average width foot
Cons:  Not much underfoot protection despite rock plate, a bit heavy for such a minimalist shoe
Bottom line:  The highest rated shoe in our review due to its fantastic traction and a great choice for off trail adventures.
Editors' Rating:   
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Manufacturer:   Inov-8

Our Verdict

After comprehensively testing all the shoes in this year's review for traction performance on steep dirt, steep grass, mud, dry rocks and wet rocks, we were surprised to find that large sticky rubber cleats located on the outsole of the Inov-8 Roclite 290 gripped all surfaces better than any other. It was the only shoe that handled every tricky and problematic surface without any hint of slippage, and thus we chose to recognize it as our Top Pick for Traction. It was even able to unseat our long held standard for optimal traction, the Salomon Speedcross 4, due to its superior grip on wet rock when running in the rain. But the Roclite 290 was not simply a gimmicky shoe with excellent traction, it also tied our Best Overall trail running shoe, the Nike Air Zoom Terra Kiger 4 as the highest rated contender in our review. It is very comfortable, has a stable, low to the ground profile, and offers optimal sensitivity while still employing a mid-shank rock plate for underfoot protection. If you are looking for an excellent running shoe with absolutely unrivaled traction, then we recommend the Roclite 290 as the shoe for you.


RELATED REVIEW: The Best Men's Trail Running Shoes of 2017


Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Andy Wellman
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Tuesday
September 12, 2017

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The Roclite 290 is a minimalist, low-profile shoe with a mere 4mm of heel-toe drop and only 13.5mm of stack height in the forefoot. As these numbers would suggest, this ensures it offers a light, nimble, and highly sensitive ride. Its high-quality inner construction is comfortable and flexible, and the overall impression from this shoe is that it will help you achieve your running goals by leaving the mechanics of your foot primarily un-modified. Runners who love a flexible, sensitive, and low to the ground shoe will a powerful the Roclite 290. On the other hand, despite the midsole rock plate, this shoe provides vastly less underfoot protection than most in this review; runners who feel like they need a substantial buffer between them and the gnarly rocks they run over may want to check out Inov-8's Roclite 305 instead. The Roclite has the same great traction but with 8mm drop and a bit of added cushioning, mostly in the heel.

Compared to the rest of the competition in this review, the Roclite 290 impressively tied with the Nike Terra Kiger 4 as the highest overall rated shoes. Compared to that model, it had a narrower forefoot and seemed to hug the foot slightly more snugly, but felt a bit less protective underfoot, and was a smidge heavier. Most impressively, it was able to outperform the extremely aggressive lug patterns on both the Saucony Peregrine 7 and the Salomon Speedcross 4, especially when it came to grip on wet rock, which is why we awarded it our Top Pick for Traction.

Performance Comparison


Check out the chart below to see how the Roclite 290, highlighted in blue, compared to the competition in the overall, cumulative scoring:


The summit of Coxcomb Peak is well-known as one of the hardest 13ers in Colorado to access  with mandatory chossy 5.6 scrambling. Here is the author  about to reverse the crux section along the summit ridge  racing the impending lightning storm  while wearing our Top Pick for Traction  the Inov-8 Roclite 290. Photo by Stephen Eginoire.
The summit of Coxcomb Peak is well-known as one of the hardest 13ers in Colorado to access, with mandatory chossy 5.6 scrambling. Here is the author, about to reverse the crux section along the summit ridge, racing the impending lightning storm, while wearing our Top Pick for Traction, the Inov-8 Roclite 290. Photo by Stephen Eginoire.

Foot Protection


There is no doubt that foot protection is the weakness of this shoe, and so it will be appreciated more by agile runners with a nimble, light-footed running style who like to dance over rough terrain more than they simply like to stomp right through. Despite a midsole rock plate, this shoe has the lowest forefoot stack height in this review of a mere 13.5mm and sports a lot of flexibility. While it has a thick, rubberized toe-bumper, as well as rubberized overlays that cover the high wear areas of the mesh fabric upper, these features do more to protect the shoe itself from over-wear, than they will guard your foot against impacts from obstacles.


While it was on the more sensitive and less protective end of the spectrum in this review, the Roclite 290 still dampened the effect of tromping over sharp rocks better than the highly sensitive Altra Superior 3.0 or the slipper-like La Sportiva Helios 2.0. It was only slightly less protective than its most similar competitors, both in feel and in overall score, the Terra Kiger 4 and Peregrine 7. We gave it 5 out of 10 points for this metric.

In terrain this rocky and high consequence  we were no longer running. However  we enjoyed the firm toe bumper that was a much appreciated barrier between stubbing our toes on all the rocks.
In terrain this rocky and high consequence, we were no longer running. However, we enjoyed the firm toe bumper that was a much appreciated barrier between stubbing our toes on all the rocks.

Traction


When testing for traction we compared each shoe for its performance on steep loose dirt, steep grass, dry talus, wet rock slabs, and steep muddy trail, giving a rating of 1-5 for each surface based on how well it gripped and inspired confidence to move fast. The Roclite 290 was the only shoe which we felt garnered a perfect 5 rating for every single surface and an impressive feat! While its 5mm deep "cleat-shaped" lugs are well spaced apart for the optimal shedding of mud and grip on grass and dirt, even more, impressive to us was how well the sticky Tri-C rubber compound gripped the rock, even when wet. Our only minor concern was that this sticky rubber compound might not be as durable as a harder rubber, and by the end of the testing period, we had experienced a few nicks and tears to these lugs.


Showing the sticky rubber cleats on the outsole as the storm clouds build in the background on top of Coxcomb Peak  in the San Juan Mountains. Not only did this shoe grip well on grass and dirt  but was also extremely sticky on rock and wet rock.
Showing the sticky rubber cleats on the outsole as the storm clouds build in the background on top of Coxcomb Peak, in the San Juan Mountains. Not only did this shoe grip well on grass and dirt, but was also extremely sticky on rock and wet rock.

The next closest competitors when it came to traction were the Salomon Speedcross 4 and the Saucony Peregrine 7. The only place that these two awesomely aggressive outsoles failed to hold their own was on the wet rock test, where we landed and pushed off repeatedly on wet slabs of the talus in the rain, a test that the Roclite 290 impressively managed to ace. While its award winning traction will surely benefit runners on the trails, we feel that athletes who commonly venture off trail will especially profit from this shoe's unique grip.

These Inov-8 shoes were the stickiest soles when it came to gripping rock. We tested each shoe side-by-side on this steep slab to see how well they gripped rock. Immediately after it began raining and we tested them all again on this now wet slab as well.
These Inov-8 shoes were the stickiest soles when it came to gripping rock. We tested each shoe side-by-side on this steep slab to see how well they gripped rock. Immediately after it began raining and we tested them all again on this now wet slab as well.

Stability


With a very low 4mm heel-toe drop and a mere 17.5mm of stack height in the heel, the lowest in this review, this was naturally a very stable shoe. Through years of testing, we have found time and again that the lower a shoe is to the ground, and especially in the heel, the more stable it tends to feel, and the Roclite 290 is no exception.


However, despite the lowest profile in this review, we found that in our side-hilling test, where we ran back and forth across a steep grassy hill to better understand how well a shoe held our foot in place, this shoe was not the best. The flexible and lightweight mesh upper seemed to not have enough rigidity to hold our foot firmly on top of the midsole platform, and in this department, it was outscored by the Terra Kiger 4. Likewise, the zero drop Altra Superior 3.0 also felt more stable during this test. That said, we felt absolutely no instability, or foot slippage of any sort, while running straight downhill in this shoe, which more closely mimics actual trail conditions. 8 out of 10 points.

Notice how the lacing system runs through bands of webbing that then go internal but hug around the middle of the foot on each side. This system really adds to the stability of the shoe by keeping the foot comfortably locked in place.
Notice how the lacing system runs through bands of webbing that then go internal but hug around the middle of the foot on each side. This system really adds to the stability of the shoe by keeping the foot comfortably locked in place.

Comfort


There is no doubt that this shoe is comfortable to wear. The "Adapterweb" foot cradle system that translates the tightening of the laces into foot hugging security is very comfortable for the foot, and the interior liner is genuinely seamless, eliminating any possible instances of rubbing or pinching against the skin. It fits true to size and is of average width, which means that it does not have the same extra-wide forefoot that many shoe designs are adopting these days. That said, it is certainly not as narrow as the Speedcross 4 or Helios 2.0.


While we felt it was one of the most comfortable shoes in this review out of the box, we were a bit disappointed by its performance in our water bucket test, especially for a shoe designed in and for the wet climates of Great Britain. It was the single most absorptive shoe when dunked in the bucket for 20 seconds, and also retained the largest percentage of water after the five-minute jog. Maybe fell-runners are simply used to having continuously drenched feet, but we felt that compared to the competition we had to dock it a point for these results, and only gave it 8 out of 10 for Comfort.

The single piece  virtually seamless inner is very comfortable! Unfortunately we found that this material absorbed the most amount of water  percentage wise  of any shoe in our bucket test.
The single piece, virtually seamless inner is very comfortable! Unfortunately we found that this material absorbed the most amount of water, percentage wise, of any shoe in our bucket test.

Weight


Our size Men's 11 shoes (US) weighed in at 22.1 ounces straight out of the box, placing it squarely in the middle of the field.


While this shows that it is by no means a heavy shoe, it was slightly surprising to us that such a minimal feeling shoe with such a thin midsole was not one of the lightest shoes in the review. By comparison, the lightest shoe was the Helios 2.0 which only weighed 17 ounces per pair, and the New Balance Vazee Summit v2, a shoe that has a similarly thin forefoot midsole, weighed in at only 19.9 ounces per pair. Regardless of the lower score, this shoe doesn't feel heavy or cumbersome on your foot, but rather allows for a light and nimble running style.

Sensitivity


With so little midsole cushioning underfoot, and a correspondingly low score for foot protection, it is no surprise that we found this shoe to be among the most sensitive we tested. In our sensitivity testing, where we purposely ran back and forth across patches of jagged and sharp rocks, we could easily feel the edges and points of the rocks digging into our feet, but not at all to the point of pain. It is mildly surprising that this shoe does include a midfoot rock plate because it didn't exactly feel like there was much between our foot and the ground.


To run optimally fast in this shoe, one will need to avoid the sharpest and pointiest of obstacles, either by terrain choice or by running style. This shoe is meant more for a quick dancer than a loud stomper, and in that way, we found it very similar to both the Peregrine 7 as well as the Altra Lone Peak 3.5. It was not, however, anywhere near as sensitive as the very thin soled Helios 2.0. 8 out of 10 points.

Before we even recognized how amazing its traction was  we enjoyed running in the Roclite 290 on a family trip to northern Minnesota. Its great stability and light weight helped us crank out the miles on flat trails.
Before we even recognized how amazing its traction was, we enjoyed running in the Roclite 290 on a family trip to northern Minnesota. Its great stability and light weight helped us crank out the miles on flat trails.

Best Applications


The Roclite 290 is a low-profile, sensitive, stable shoe that has the best traction one can find. As such, we feel like it is ideally suited to more mature runners who have strong feet and adaptable strides. While it is equally suited to any terrain type, off-trail fell-runners and ridge scramblers will especially appreciate its fantastic sticky outsole, as will runners who usually leave the house in the rain.

Collecting miles on the Baldy trail near Ridgway  CO  with the Sneffels Range in the background. We appreciated the Inov-8 Roclite 290 equally as a low profile trail runner as we did for off-trail scrambles.
Collecting miles on the Baldy trail near Ridgway, CO, with the Sneffels Range in the background. We appreciated the Inov-8 Roclite 290 equally as a low profile trail runner as we did for off-trail scrambles.

Value


This shoe retails for $120, making it average in the cost department. Since we found it to be the highest rated model in this review, we certainly think this is money worth spending. That said, its minimalist nature and soft, sticky outsole mean that it may not withstand as many miles as a burlier trainer, meaning that if you want to get the most out of it, you may want to reserve it for special days, rather than use it on every single run.

The Inov-8 Roclite 290 is a lightweight  low profile shoe that is very comfortable to wear  extremely stable  and has the very best traction of any running shoe in our review.
The Inov-8 Roclite 290 is a lightweight, low profile shoe that is very comfortable to wear, extremely stable, and has the very best traction of any running shoe in our review.

Conclusion


The Inov-8 Roclite 290 is a low-profile shoe that is flexible and sensitive and has the very best outsole in this review. It was also tied for the highest overall score. Its sticky rubber and deep lugs gripped all surfaces so well that it deserved recognition as one of our Top Picks. For people who need a running shoe for off-trail missions that require the best grip for the best performance, we recommend you begin your shoe search right here.

Trapped in a cold rainstorm  waiting below treeline for over an hour for the lightning to stop  Stephen Eginoire captured this awesome photo of the fire he started to keep us warm. This day was a great test of all types of mountain terrain - trails to off-trail tundra to alpine scrambling  and then lots of trail running back to the car. The Roclite 290 was an ideal choice.
Trapped in a cold rainstorm, waiting below treeline for over an hour for the lightning to stop, Stephen Eginoire captured this awesome photo of the fire he started to keep us warm. This day was a great test of all types of mountain terrain - trails to off-trail tundra to alpine scrambling, and then lots of trail running back to the car. The Roclite 290 was an ideal choice.
Andy Wellman

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Most recent review: September 12, 2017
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