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Vibram V-Trail 2.0 Review

Our Top Pick for trails, run in comfort and confidence in this tank of a FiveFingers shoe.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $120 List | $89.03 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Tough exterior, stable, snug lacing system
Cons:  Odd flex pattern, decreased sensitivity, lack of dexterity in toes
Manufacturer:   Vibram
By Aaron Rice ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 21, 2019
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71
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 8
  • Running Performance - 30% 8
  • Barefoot Accuracy - 25% 6
  • Comfort - 15% 7
  • Traction - 15% 7
  • Versatility - 10% 6
  • Durability - 5% 9

Our Verdict

The Vibram V-Trail 2.0 is a beefed-up version of the now-classic FiveFingers design. The V-Trail is what we would consider being the epitome of an adventure racing shoe — a sturdy, yet flexible outsole combined with a durable and water-resistant upper. As a result, we awarded it with our Top Pick for a minimalist trail running shoe. We had a blast scrambling rock faces and bounding through creeks, knowing that our feet were protected from the elements. It's also pretty packable for convenient travel. At first glance, this shoe is the perfect trail running companion for barefoot-enthusiasts. However, the V-Trail falls short when it comes to sensitivity and barefoot accuracy — most notably, the thick rubber rand significantly impacts toe proprioception. Just a heads up if that's key to you.


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Vibram V-Trail 2.0
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $89.03 at Amazon
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$64.95 at Amazon
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Pros Tough exterior, stable, snug lacing systemSuper lightweight, exceptional ground-feel, freedom of movementVersatile, durable, tough, uniqueDurable, rugged, tough on the road, stylishMulti-purpose for trail or road, flexible, lightweight, breathable
Cons Odd flex pattern, decreased sensitivity, lack of dexterity in toesInconsistent grip, short stock laces, potentially short lifetimeWeighty, aggressively barefoot in designExpensive, low traction, fit larger than mostFit very snug, not for people with a high bridge, costly
Bottom Line Our Top Pick for trails, run in comfort and confidence in this tank of a FiveFingers shoe.Impressive barefoot accuracy from a road trainer that performs equally well on trails.This versatile, rugged shoe is a bit bulky and clunky looking but performs as well or better than more established minimalist designs out there.If you can afford the sticker shock, these are a great road shoe that you can wear around town without looking foolish.This durable, multi-purpose trainer from New Balance offers a repeat of the same design users have come to love over the years.
Rating Categories Vibram V-Trail 2.0 Merrell Vapor Glove 4 Xero Shoes Prio Vivobarefoot Stealth 2 Minimus 10v1 Trail
Running Performance (30%)
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
8
Barefoot Accuracy (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
4
Comfort (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
7
Traction (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
Versatility (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
8
Durability (5%)
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
9
Specs Vibram V-Trail 2.0 Merrell Vapor... Xero Shoes Prio Vivobarefoot... Minimus 10v1 Trail
Weight (per shoe, size EU 42) 6.9 oz 5.4 oz 9.3 oz (9.7 oz w/ optional insole) 8.4 oz 8.0 oz
Stack Height (mm) 3.7 mm 6.5 mm 5.5 mm 3.0 mm 15 mm/11 mm
Cushion (mm) 2 mm EVA Insole 0 Optional 2 mm Insole 0 0
Heel to Toe drop (mm) 0 0 0 0 4mm
Upper 3D Cocoon Mesh Cordura mesh and TPU Mesh with synthetic leather overlays EVA cage with mesh Synthetic mesh
Outsole 3.7mm, Megagrip Rubber 3.5mm, Vibram TC5+ 5.5mm, FeelTrue Rubber 3mm, V Road Rubber w/ PRO5 Integrated, Vibram rubber w/ Flex Grooves
Width Options None None None None Wide Version Available
Style Barefoot trail Barefoot road Barefoot road Barefoot road Minimalist trail

Our Analysis and Test Results

Vibram knows a thing or two about producing quality outsoles — you will find their rubber on the bottom of many top-quality trail runners. The V-Trail 2.0 is no exception, as a barefoot running shoe supported by a thick, heavily lugged outsole ready to stand guard against rocks or roots that try to penetrate the bottom of your foot. Achieving a delicate balance of design that is both lightweight and burly, this shoe gave us maximum confidence to strike out onto trails at full-speed — a quality not often associated with minimalist shoes. While we enjoyed the comfort and confidence the V-Trail provided in tackling uneven terrain, it doesn't exactly encompass all ideals of a minimalist shoe. The upper is snug, but also restricts movement in the forefoot; an odd flex pattern makes it difficult to grip the ground with your toes; a thick outsole diminishes ground-feel; and the relatively thick material of the upper actually makes it pretty hot to run in, particularly when exposed to direct sunlight. Although we believe this is one of the best options out there when it comes to choosing a minimalist trail running shoe, the V-Trail misses the mark in terms of exceptional barefoot-feel. But hey, incredible barefoot-feel on rooty, rocky trails might not be what the doctor ordered…

Performance Comparison


The snug fit of this shoe is braced across the top by a quick-lacing system that we found did a great job staying in place  even on long trail runs.
The snug fit of this shoe is braced across the top by a quick-lacing system that we found did a great job staying in place, even on long trail runs.

Running Performance


The V-Trail scored right up with the front runners of our review in terms of running performance. We really enjoyed speeding down all types of trails in this shoe, from sandy arroyos to high-alpine ridges. With zero-drop and a mere 3.7mm stack height, your foot is right on the ground, and feels incredibly stable moving over varied terrain. When it came to longer runs, particularly on mountain trails that inevitably include long sections of downhill, we appreciated the inclusion of a non-removable EVA insole that provides 2mm of cushioning.


While the power of the V-Trail is highlighted in the mountains, it does not perform as well when it comes to city life. Even though they are not heavy, these shoes felt clunky and less agile when pulled out of their element and put on the road. We began to notice that V-Trail fits tight in the midfoot and toes, and a lack of flexibility in these same areas made them slightly more uncomfortable running uphill on pavement. This 2.0 version improves upon previous durability issues by wrapping the whole shoe — including each individual toe — in Vibram's proprietary 3D Cocoon mesh. But as a result, the toes don't quite have the same amount of space to expand naturally over the course of a run.

Consider the Benefits of Wearing Socks
As an adventure shoe, the V-Trail 2.0 hikes, scrambles, and climbs great — wet or dry — without socks. But if you plan to make it your daily trail runner, we suggest wearing a five-finger sock to help prevent blisters, like offerings from Injinji.

When it comes to toe-articulation to mold around and grip rocks on the trail  it's hard to beat the FiveFingers design.
When it comes to toe-articulation to mold around and grip rocks on the trail, it's hard to beat the FiveFingers design.

Barefoot Accuracy


Design considerations of trail running shoes — constructed to protect our feet from rough terrain — often don't follow the same principles coveted by barefoot and minimalist footwear. The V-Trail is an impressive trail runner, but as a result, falls a bit short when it comes to barefoot accuracy. The 3.7mm stack height is all used up in outsole rubber, which results in decreased sensitivity across the extent of the bottom of the shoe. The relatively thick outsole is great at blocking rocks from penetrating your foot, but not great at relaying feedback from the terrain.


The FiveFingers design is intended to allow for maximum freedom of movement — namely allowing your toes to splay and flex independently — as if you were running barefoot. Overall the V-Trail is quite flexible in all directions, but that flexion is inhibited by the thick rubber that extends to wrap the front of each toe. You will notice that your toes still have the ability to mold to the terrain, but the proprioception of your foot position is what fails as a result of this added protection. We actually found ourselves tripping over our toes on a few occasions.

True to Vibram's roots  a fully wrapped outsole protects the bottom of your feet  regardless of how adventurous your run gets.
True to Vibram's roots, a fully wrapped outsole protects the bottom of your feet, regardless of how adventurous your run gets.

Comfort


We appreciated the thoughtful design considerations put into the upper of the V-Trail as a trail-specific shoe. The upper comfortably engulfs your foot and is secured with a fast-lacing system that evenly distributes pressure across the top of the arch and forefoot. While the thick Cocoon mesh sacrifices a bit of breathability for top-notch water resistance, our feet were only hot on desert trails when the darkly-colored shoes were exposed to extended periods of direct sunlight.


Trending toward stability, the shoe is tight-fitting with a secure heel pocket — this allowed us to make quick moves on slick and uneven terrain with confidence. While the midfoot is wider than other FiveFingers models, the V-Trail is tighter in the forefoot and toes. As stated above, the thick outsole and additional cushioning included in the insole is a plus for trail-runners, but we could not help but notice how it detracted from overall ground-feel.

Even after plunging through multiple  ankle deep puddles  these shoes were only slightly wet across the forefoot and toes.
Even after plunging through multiple, ankle deep puddles, these shoes were only slightly wet across the forefoot and toes.

Traction


With a heavily lugged base, the V-Trail was clearly designed as a shoe to grip and climb rugged terrain. This shoe is awesome for scrambling — particularly on sandstone — and we were comfortable making 3rd/4th-class moves thanks to the sticky rubber of the outsole. We also found them to perform well on uphills, where our toes were easily able to flex, grip, and push off with graceful power.


But on downhills, we were surprised by the lack of traction. After a closer examination of the lug pattern, we noticed that all of the raised, triangular lugs are all oriented in the same forward-facing direction — this supports what we were feeling on the trail, where we could feel the outsole catch, but not brake in the same way other lugged designs will.

Toe articulation separate from the body of the rest of the shoe makes these great for scrambling - and for some reason  the rubber compound of the outsole is particularly grippy on sandstone.
Toe articulation separate from the body of the rest of the shoe makes these great for scrambling - and for some reason, the rubber compound of the outsole is particularly grippy on sandstone.

Versatility


Comments aside regarding the fashion of FiveFingers shoes, we believe that the V-Trail lives up to its name, and is really best suited as a trail running shoe. Its low-profile, even platform provides adequate stability for weight-lifting, but we found the shoe to run a little too hot for extended gym sessions.


Where the V-Trail shines in terms of versatility is superior water resistance. Running through creeks and puddles, this shoe only barely takes on water around the ball of the foot, while the rest remains practically — and comfortably — dry enough to continue running without fear of developing hot spots.

While the platform of this shoe is stable  we found the burly upper a little too heavy for regular gym time.
While the platform of this shoe is stable, we found the burly upper a little too heavy for regular gym time.

Durability


The V-Trail is a tank of a minimalist shoe. A tough, abrasion-resistant upper is supported by laminates of TPU in key spots across the toes, and around the heel pocket.


Additionally, the majority of the upper is braced with Cordura-like nylon. The 3D Cocoon mesh is woven directly into the outsole, which is further laminated around the toes to help prevent previous issues with seam-splitting. We put this shoe through the wringer, and it came out practically unscathed — we cannot imagine many issues with durability.

A full mesh upper helped these shoes dry out quickly  performing well when jumping in and out of water.
A full mesh upper helped these shoes dry out quickly, performing well when jumping in and out of water.

Value


The V-Trail tends toward the pricier side of minimalist running shoes. For those who want high-quality protection for trail running, the extra cost is easily justified.

For off-trail travel  you will appreciate how the grippy outsole of this shoe wraps up the front of the toes  and around the sides of the shoe.
For off-trail travel, you will appreciate how the grippy outsole of this shoe wraps up the front of the toes, and around the sides of the shoe.

Conclusion


Built for adventure, the Vibram V-Trail 2.0 is a rugged option for a minimalist running shoe, earning our Top Pick for trail running. Whatever situation you might find yourself in, the V-Trail 2.0 will certainly do its best to keep your feet protected from anything you throw its way. While it may not be the choice for minimalist runners looking for authentic ground-feel, for those willing to compromise a little bit on the strict virtues of barefoot-running, you will have a ton of fun crushing trails in these shoes.

We found this shoe to be comfortable in nearly any condition  from softer soils of the alpine down to rockier desert routes  and everything in between.
We found this shoe to be comfortable in nearly any condition, from softer soils of the alpine down to rockier desert routes, and everything in between.


Aaron Rice