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Yes4All Rock Climbing Hangboard Review

Similar in design to some high-end boards, this model may disappoint those looking thinking they are getting a screaming deal on a high-end board
Yes4All Rock Climbing Hangboard
Photo: Amazon
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Price:  $60 List | $59.99 at Amazon
Pros:  Great price, lots of holds for the price, several difficult pockets and edges, small dimensions
Cons:  Sharper edges, uneven crimping surface, poor difficulty progression
Manufacturer:   Yes4All
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Feb 19, 2021
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Our Verdict

Our review team was pretty excited to try out this model. At first glance, it appears to be a close replica of the classic Beastmaker 1000, only costing much less and much easier to order (something that frequently isn't the case with the Beastmaker). While the Yes4All is a decent board for the price, those expecting a perfect replica will be sorely disappointed. The edges look similar in size and location but offer far fewer intermediate depths. It also lacks a well-rounded progression to increase difficulty incrementally. Moreover, the finished product is far rougher. This board is a fair option for the price, but it isn't the high-end board it resembles.

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


The Yes4All looks a lot like the timeless Beastmaker 1000. After...
The Yes4All looks a lot like the timeless Beastmaker 1000. After testing this model hands-on, we realized that these boards are only similar in appearance, not performance.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Edges and Pockets


This model is a little all-or-nothing when it comes to its edges and pockets. Our review team found it to lack as good of a progression compared to boards with far fewer holds. It basically offers all finger sizes in a relatively easy 40mm edge and then two very similar 10mm and 12.5mm depths. This is a pretty big jump in difficulty, giving users fewer options for more incremental gains. Yes, you can get stronger on this board, but those considering it should know it has one of the least balanced progression of holds of any board we've seen.

This model has one set of warm-up depth edges and two very similar...
This model has one set of warm-up depth edges and two very similar depth edges that are considerably more difficult. While this board can be productive for training, it doesn't offer much progression.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Edges

While this model has a lot in common with the Beastmaker 1000, what is different are the depths of its holds, including its 4-finger edges. They look the same, but they are actually far from it. This model has one set of larger 40mm edges which for most climbers is quite deep. It basically equates to a warm-up edge. Then it sports two very similar 4-finger edges depths. These two edges are 10mm and 12.5mm, which are very similar to one another. Better models have differences of 6-10mm, which offers a better progression.

We prefer boards with a greater variety of 4-finger edges as that is...
We prefer boards with a greater variety of 4-finger edges as that is what the majority of climbers do the bulk of their training on. You can also see the glue residue on this board as a sign of how hastily it is finished.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

This is one of the biggest differences between this board and the Beastmaker 1000. The Beastmaker's 4-finger edges are 14mm, 20mm, and 45mm, which we feel is a better progression of edges for most climbers. The 45mm edge is a nice "warm-edge for a lot of climbers, and the 14mm and 20mm edges offers a nice progression of difficulty for folks rather than 10 and 12.5mm.

The central grips are less comfortable because they are so close...
The central grips are less comfortable because they are so close together. This design presses our thumbs and index fingers together and will likely feel hard, especially on sensitive elbows and shoulders.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

*Pockets

On the middle level, all of the Yes4All edges are 40mm, meaning they have three total 4-finger edges, along with a pair of 3-finger pockets and 2-finger pockets that are all 40mm in depth. 40mm is a good depth for folks not-yet doing 2-finger and 3-finger hangs to start to work into using smaller finger groups. However, from there, this model has only one 3-finger 30mm depth at the center of the board, which is quite awkward to use, and then the 2-finger and 3-finger pockets on the bottom. These are both 10mm in depth, which feels tiny, and bordering on unusable for all but elite climbers.

These pockets also look similar to the Beastmaker 1000 in their relative size and positioning, but the Beastmaker's edge depths are more variable and offer a better progression of holds relative to their size. For example, the Beastmaker's 2-finger pocket is 50mm as it is a harder hold and also offers 3-finger pockets in 30mm and 20mm sizes. The Yes4All board's lack of middle-difficulty edges and pockets makes it more challenging to have incremental improvements that a more gradual progression of holds would allow.

This model's jugs have the most basic shape of any model and are the...
This model's jugs have the most basic shape of any model and are the least rounded off. Still, they don't feel that bad.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Slopers and Jugs


This model sports two sloper options and a large warm-up/pull-up jug. The slopers are 33-degrees and 18-degrees, which are nice for building while hand strength, warming-up, or finishing with a nice burn after your primary workout. The jugs aren't are rounded as most other models but are a great place to crank-out a few pull-ups or work on overall lock-off strength.

This model has two slopers, 33-degrees and 18-degrees. Our testing...
This model has two slopers, 33-degrees and 18-degrees. Our testing team found them nice for building whole hand strength, warming-up, or finishing our works outs with a nice burn.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Pinches


This board has no real pinches. Very few of our testers found this to be a big deal, as half crimps and open crimping does increase sloper and pinch strength to some extent.

We found the edges on this model to be quite bumpy and uneven, which...
We found the edges on this model to be quite bumpy and uneven, which proved harder on our fingertips. Tough to see, but easy to feel.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Texture


The texture of this board is another big disadvantage of this board for those hoping they might be getting a good deal. Several of this model's edges, particularly the larger ones, have scrapes, bumps, or were generally uneven. This didn't prove to be a deal-breaker on the first hang of the night or for more casual use, but after just a few hangs, our fingertips could easily feel all the irregularities. These bumps and irregularities were a lot less frequent on the smaller edges. Those planning on training extensively on their board should note that these irregularities will take a toll on your fingertips.

Irregularities aside, this model offered just so-so texture, which is surprising for a wood board. It didn't strike as nice a balance of smoothness and friction as the wooden options from Metolius, which all of our testers found to have a nicer feeling and more skin-friendly texture. Texture is a big reason why many climbers will spring for a wooden board, but this model doesn't really pull through in this area.

At a little under 22" x 6", this model will fit where most other...
At a little under 22" x 6", this model will fit where most other models might not.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Ease of Mounting


This model is easy to mount. With dimensions fo 21.7" x 5.9", it is short enough to fit above doorways even in basements or other odd places with below-average height ceilings (even as low as 7ft). While its screw distances don't line up with any sort of average stud distance nor is this board wide enough to go into the Jack or King studs on either side of the doorway, its 5.9" height means that it will likely just be able to go into the door frame header. This means most people won't have to mount this board to plywood before putting it up.

The price might be the most attractive feature of this board, which...
The price might be the most attractive feature of this board, which truly is impressive for a wooden board.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Value


This model is among the least expensive hangboards on the market and certainly one of the best prices for a wood board with this many holds. However, its less skin-friendly edges and irregular surfaces kept it from winning us over. Still, the Yes4All offers a good number of holds. If you are willing to sand down the edges (which many people do), we think you'll see more value in this product. There's not a lot one can do, though, to improve the progression of holds.

We definitely got a workout on this hangboard. Still, compared to...
We definitely got a workout on this hangboard. Still, compared to other options available, we think you can get a better board at a similar price that will provide a better overall training experience.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Conclusion


This board is a decent board for the price, but to some extent, you get what you pay for. The main things that kept it from being well-liked by our testers are its mediocre progression of holds, irregularly and bumpy edge surfaces, and less rounded edges that most of our testing team thought felt "sharp." A little sanding may improve your experience with this model, but we think there are better options available.

Ian Nicholson