The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Coleman Triton Plus Review

Compact and affordable, this stove struggles with the wind but is a nice option for a camp cook with simple needs.
Coleman Triton
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Price:  $100 List | $90.39 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Solid performer across many metrics, good packed size, excellent price, reliable
Cons:  Slower boiling time, struggles with wind resistance, smaller cooking area
Manufacturer:   Coleman
By Penney Garrett ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 4, 2019
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48
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 14
  • Time to Boil - 25% 3
  • Wind Resistance - 25% 3
  • Simmering Ability - 20% 6
  • Ease of Set Up - 10% 7
  • Ease of Care - 10% 7
  • Portability - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The Coleman Triton Plus is an affordable stove with decent performance, though it has shortcomings when stacked against some of the other competitors in our review. To be fair, this has more to say about the caliber of stoves we tested than the Triton itself. We tested some high-performing models, and this one simply boils water a little slower, struggles with the wind a bit more, and offers a couple of inches less cooking space. That said, it is a solid stove with excellent simmer control, a sound auto-ignition system, and well-made design. Depending on your particular needs, this may be the perfect stove for you at a very fair price.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Coleman Triton
Awards  Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award 
Price $90.39 at Amazon
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$124.95 at REI
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$99.99 at REI
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Solid performer across many metrics, good packed size, excellent price, reliableDurable, wind-resistant, powerful, even cooking, auto-ignitionEfficient, durable, compact, has auto-ignitionNon-slip rubber feet for leveling, large cooking surface, durable metal latches instead of plasticGreat simmering ability, freestanding, legs are removable, powerful burners, tons of cooking space
Cons Slower boiling time, struggles with wind resistance, smaller cooking areaPlastic latches on frontCooks hot, ignitor is sometimes finickyStruggles with the wind, not super powerful, on the heavy sideNo auto ignition system, does not operate on 16oz propane canisters, wind puts out burner easily
Bottom Line Compact and affordable, this stove struggles with the wind but is a nice option for a camp cook with simple needs.This has been an Editors' Choice for more than six years.This compact and well-functioning stove boil quickly, is easy to care for, and won't break the bank.This stove is pretty standard, but does provide a large cooking surface and useful non-slip rubber feet for keeping it level, no matter where your camp kitchen ends up.With high BTUs, a large cooking area, and removable legs, this freestanding stove offers a lot of options for big groups and chef-minded camp cooks.
Rating Categories Coleman Triton Plus Camp Chef Everest GSI Outdoors Selkirk 540 Eureka Ignite Plus Camp Chef Explorer 2-Burner
Time To Boil (25%)
10
0
3
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
Wind Resistance (25%)
10
0
3
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
5
Simmering Ability (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
8
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
5
Ease Of Care (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
9
Portability (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
3
Specs Coleman Triton Plus Camp Chef Everest GSI Outdoors... Eureka Ignite Plus Camp Chef Explorer...
Weight (pounds) 11 lbs 12.3 lbs 9.8 lbs 12.0 lbs 30.6 lbs (19.2 lbs without legs)
Total BTU (from manufacturer) 22,000 40,000 20,000 20,000 60,000
Boil Time (1 quart of water, wind from a box fan) 15 min 3 min 5.5 min 6.25 min 5 min
Boil Time (1 quart of water, no wind) 4.75 min 2.5 min 4 min 4.75 min 3.75 min
Cooktop material Aluminized steel Nickel-coated steel Nickel-chrome steel Plated steel Cast aluminum
Packed Size (inches) 21" x 12.5" x 4.5" 23.5" x 13.5" x 4" 21.4" x 12.9" x 3.8" 23" x 12.8" x 4" 32.75" x 14" x 7.75" (height not including legs)
Cooking surface dimensions (inches) 17" x 9" 19" x 9.5" 17.5" x 9.5" 20.5" x 9.5" 32.5" x 13.75"
Burner/flame diameter 3" 3.5" 3" 3" 5"
Distance between burners (center to center) 11" 12" 11" 12" 13"
Windscreen? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Piezo Ignitor? Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Number of burners 2 2 2 2 2
Type of Model Tabletop Tabletop Tabletop, foldable Tabletop, foldable Freestanding
Fuel Type Propane Propane Propane Propane Propane - large 20# tank
Mfr. Model Number 2000020954NP MS2HP 56012 2572195 EX60LW

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Triton Plus is not as fancy or powerful as many of the other stoves we tested. Still, it gets the job done, and we genuinely enjoyed the cooking experience it provided.

Performance Comparison


The Triton performs well with detailed cooking and simmering.
The Triton performs well with detailed cooking and simmering.

Time to Boil


The Triton boiled a quart of water in 4:45, which is a pretty decent time considering it only has 11,000 BTUs per burner. However, on a breezier day with cooler water, this same task took 9:15. This is a larger time difference than we saw with almost any other stove, even models without a windscreen and with lower BTUs. If boiling water is an important aspect of your camp kitchen experience, you may want to purchase a different stove or get a JetBoil Flash as a companion accessory.

With its small burners and lower BTU per burner  the Triton didn't fare as well as its competitors and ended up with one of the lowest scores for boiling time.
With its small burners and lower BTU per burner, the Triton didn't fare as well as its competitors and ended up with one of the lowest scores for boiling time.

Wind Resistance


This is the place where the Triton struggles the most. With only 11,000 BTUs per burner, we expected some loss in performance under less-than-ideal circumstances, but perhaps not to the extent we saw. During our box fan test, where we set up a large fan 24 inches to the side of each stove and timed the boiling of a quart of water, the Triton finished with one of the slowest times at 15 minutes. Again, for your sleepy-eyed campmates that need coffee ASAP in the mornings, you may want to also have a JetBoil on hand — it'll save you time and fuel for sure.

The Triton doesn't boil water very quickly  particularly when there is wind  but it does cook food efficiently.
The Triton doesn't boil water very quickly, particularly when there is wind, but it does cook food efficiently.

Simmering Ability


The Triton simmers quite well once you get the hang of it. The flame is a bit hard to see when it's turned down very low, so some attention is required to avoid accidentally turning it off. On top of that, the burner knob's full range is several full 360-degree rotations, but to turn it from low to off is only about a quarter turn. And despite the low BTUs on this stove, it does seem to cook quite fast, so, again, some attention is required to find the right setting when you want to simmer. However, once you learn the nuances of the burner, there is no problem with performance, and cooking low and slow is no problem.

Ease of Set Up


This stove sets up just like any other compact tabletop model, with only a slight variation in the design of the windscreen. The wings slot into the side of the stove body in a way that allows you to change their angle — helpful if you have an oversize pan that needs just a little more space. A small recess in the drip tray gives the propane adaptor a place to nest into so that it doesn't slide around inside the stove as much. The adaptor also screws into the stove body much more easily than with several of the other models we tested. All in all, it's a straightforward experience with no quirks or annoyances.

This stove has a small recess to nest the fuel attachment elbow and keep it from sliding around when carrying.
This stove has a small recess to nest the fuel attachment elbow and keep it from sliding around when carrying.

Ease of Care


Another simple and straightforward process. The cooking grate lifts out, exposing an easy-to-clean steel drip tray. The recess for the propane adaptor will undoubtedly collect food bits over time, but nothing substantial unless you have some enormous spillover. We did notice after taking the Triton out for testing that it seemed to get beat up and dented faster than our other competitors, but not in any way that made us doubt the overall product integrity or performance.

The Triton cover got scratched and dented much easier than its competitors.
The Triton cover got scratched and dented much easier than its competitors.

Portability


The Triton packs down to 21 x 12.5 x 4.5 inches. This is a couple of inches smaller than many of our other compact tabletop models, but, depending on your setup, probably isn't worth the smaller burners or lower BTUs.

Value


This is fairly priced for a solid camp stove. However, when you look at the fact that you can get other stoves with more BTUs and cooktop space for just a bit more, then it makes less sense to choose this one. That being said, if you end up owning this stove, we don't think you'll be disappointed.

Conclusion


The Triton Plus is a solid stove at a reasonable price. It simmers well, sets up and ignites with ease, and is simple to care for. As a stand-alone stove, it's fine, but when stacked up against some of the other stoves we tested, it fell a bit short. It has low BTUs, a smaller cooking area, and struggles with the wind. All-in-all it's a decent stove, but not our first choice.

The Triton has the ability to adjust the position of the windscreens  allowing use of larger pans than would otherwise be possible.
The Triton has the ability to adjust the position of the windscreens, allowing use of larger pans than would otherwise be possible.


Penney Garrett