Hands-on Gear Review

Mountain Hardwear Ozonic 60 OutDry Review

The Ozonic 60 is a durable, four-season pack with lots of adjustability and storage options.
By: Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 24, 2018
Price:  $280 List  |  $209.96 at Backcountry - 25% Off
Pros:  Waterproof, sleek, easy to use, intuitive adjustability
Cons:  Not ideal for warm weather or for light loads, not hydration compatible, elastic lid
Manufacturer:   Mountain Hardwear
75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 15
  • Comfort - 24% 8
  • Weight - 23% 8
  • Suspension - 23% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 6
  • Features - 15% 8
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Our Verdict

The Mountain Hardwear Ozonic Outdry 60 is the top dog for all-season performance. This pack is incredibly durable and waterproof and provides comfort and tons of space for your gear. Rain, snow, or sunshine, the Ozonic has plenty of room for any season's gear. Though its claimed volume is 60 liters, this pack seems much larger and compares to some of the largest packs we tested, like the Arc'teryx Bora and the Lowe Alpine Manaslu. The pack is super adjustable and has plenty of compression straps to keep your kit tight and organized. Not only is it technically featured, it is very comfortable and rates high for adjustability.

Updates for Spring 2018

A number of changes have been made to the Ozonic 60 OutDry this season. The updated version saw changes made to the fabric, colors, and suspension system.

Continue reading to learn more about the specifics of these updates.


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Our Analysis and Test Results

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Updates to the Women's Ozonic 60 OutDry


The new Mountain Hardwear Ozonic 60 has a few subtle differences from the previous model we tested. Besides the color change from a light purple to navy blue, the material used in the construction of the pack has also changed. Word from the manufacturer is that the fabric has changed from 210D nylon plain weave to 330D HT Cordura Ripstop. This change is meant to increase the overall durability of the pack. Additionally, the pack has a new suspension system that provides three inches of torso adjustment meant to assist in customizing the right fit. These changes come at a cost — a $10 price increase raised the cost of the Ozonic from $270 to $280.

Below is a comparison of the new model on the left and the previous version on the right.

Listed below is a summary of the key differences between the two models:
  • Fabric change — Manufacturer switched from 210D Robic nylon plain weave to 330D HT Ripstop Cordura, a change meant to improve the durability of the pack.
  • Updated suspension — New suspension provides three inches of torso adjustment.
  • New color — Changed from lavender to dark blue.
  • Price increase — The price of this pack increased $10, from $270 to $280.

We have not worn this new pack on the trail yet, so the following review refers to the previous version.

Hands-on Review of the Ozonic 60 OutDry


Out of all the packs in this review, the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic is the only pack that is waterproof. The Outdry technology makes for a durable, waterproof, four-season model. Through summer thundershowers and autumn rainstorms, we tested this pack and were impressed by its ability to keep our gear inside dry. And if that weren't enough, it is spacious, comfortable, and highly adjustable, too.

Comfort


The padding on the shoulder straps and the hip belt are incredibly comfortable. It doesn't chafe due to the curvature designed specifically for women, and the wide hip belt is more comfortable than the thin, less padded hip belt found on the Deuter ACT Lite. The back panel is rigid, which can be comfortable for those seeking solid support or uncomfortable for women who prefer a softer, cushioned back panel. Air channels on the back panel create space for ventilation, although the overall breathability was not notably great.

The ventilation capability is ideal for cool weather, not mid-summer hiking, while the stiffness and simple design make it exceptional for heavy loads. If you are looking for a more cushioned and padded pack for comparable load sizes, the Gregory Deva or the Lowe Alpine Manaslu are good options. The overall comfort of the Ozonic is similar to the Manaslu.

The Ozonic is easy to adjust once its on. Both the hip belt and the shoulder straps are sensitive enough to make small micro-adjustments based on the weight of the pack.
The Ozonic is easy to adjust once its on. Both the hip belt and the shoulder straps are sensitive enough to make small micro-adjustments based on the weight of the pack.

Weight


At 3.81 pounds, the Ozonic is comparable to the Thule Versant 60. Its burly construction and waterproof fabric make the Ozonic feel heavy, though it is one of the lightest packs in the fleet. Because of this, it is ideal for with mid to heavy weight loads. For a pack that feels lighter than it is, the Arc'teryx Bora AR 61 feels similar to the Ozonic while it's on, but weighs almost a pound more. The lightest models in our review are Thule Versant (4.38 pounds on our scale), the Ozonic reviewed here, and The North Face Banchee (3.88 pounds).

OGL Measured Volume Bottom Line:
Total Volume = 61 L
Main Bag = 40 L
Pockets = 11 L
Lid = 10 L

Suspension


Hardwave Suspension maintains stiffness while fitting to the contours of your back. It is supportive under a range of pack loads and has the capability of maintaining stability when utilizing the compression straps on the sides and top. Like the Osprey Ariel 65 and the Thule Versant 60, the pack's design distributes weight evenly while maintaining support. An aluminum stay surrounds the back panel, joining the hip belt; this allows flexibility in the hips while creating a sturdy, lightweight frame. For a lighter frame with similar support, only The North Face Banchee 65 outdoes the Ozonic regarding a lightweight suspension system.

The lid on the Ozonic is easy to remove. We actually liked using the Ozonic without the lid more often that we expected  mostly due to the roll top closure of the main compartment.
The lid on the Ozonic is easy to remove. We actually liked using the Ozonic without the lid more often that we expected, mostly due to the roll top closure of the main compartment.

Ease of Use


The Ozonic Outdry is a highly featured pack with multiple adjustment options and compression straps. Starting at the top, the lid can be detached with two easy to locate buckles. The lid is reversible for increased water protection, and when it is absent, the top opening may be covered. Water resistance will not be compromised once the lid has been removed. The torso length is easily lengthened or shortened with the pull of a tab and a slight adjustment with the Velcro.

Shoulder straps and load lifter straps may be secured smoothly with a simple pull. All of these features make the Ozonic relatively easy to use. Though it has more pockets than the Thule Versant 60, making it a bit more complicated, it is not over the top, and one use will get you acquainted will all the adjustment points. With all of these adjustment points, the Ozonic received a slightly lower score in ease of use than the Versant and The North Face Terra 55 - Women's.

The hip belt pockets and side pockets on the Ozonic are roomy  which we liked. The hip belt pockets are large enough to stash a phone or camera  plus some snacks.
The hip belt pockets and side pockets on the Ozonic are roomy, which we liked. The hip belt pockets are large enough to stash a phone or camera, plus some snacks.

Features


The Ozonic has six enclosed compartments for organizing; one main compartment, a medium front pocket and a medium sized lid pocket, a small lid pocket, and two small hip belt pockets. This pack is spacious and well organized. There is an unenclosed front pocket as well for draining wet gear or storing items that can be exposed to weather. The lid is removable and doubles as a lumbar pack, a feature we have enjoyed on the Ariel and others for years.

Layover day? Side hiking trip? Heading into town? All are no problem with the removable lid. Spaciousness is no issue here either. The Ozonic expands upward to allow for a higher capacity than listed. At 60 liters, it feels comparable to the REI Co-op Traverse 65 or The North Face Banchee in space, simple design, and adjustment options.

The Ozonic is made of durable  waterproof material and the roll-top closure keeps water out and your gear dry.
The Ozonic is made of durable, waterproof material and the roll-top closure keeps water out and your gear dry.

Best Applications


Many of the women's packs in our review are best suited for three season backpacking. The Ozonic Outdry is suitable for four season backpacking, mountaineering, and travel. The waterproof exterior extends its seasonal applications to encompass all weather conditions. An expandable size and spacious main compartment lend to a range of weight loads and backpacking trip lengths, from weekend trips to long distance (not lightweight) trips. This pack is best with mid to heavy weight loads; it is not ideal for lightweight backpacking.

Value


At $270, it is one of the higher priced packs. This is an excellent value considering it is the only model that has a fully waterproof construction that makes it suitable for all seasons. The more you are able to use your pack, the better value it will be over time. The Arc'teryx Bora AR 61 offers more adjustability but is almost $200 more expensive, while the REI Co-op Traverse 65 is less expensive but is not as durable or versatile as the Ozonic. At a mid-range price, the Ozonic is a good value for year-round backpacking, especially if you expect to experience wet conditions, or just want the security of knowing your pack will be waterproof.

Staying out late on the trail with the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic. This contender was one of the lightest models in our review.
Staying out late on the trail with the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic. This contender was one of the lightest models in our review.

Conclusion


Mountain Hardwear has raised the bar on backpacking technology with the Outdry technology. The Ozonic is waterproof, tested in pouring rain and snow. A stiff suspension design lends to stability, even under heavy weight loads. As our Top Pick winner for four-season use, we highly recommend this pack for women seeking a technical backpacking pack that offers a spectrum of adjustment options while maintaining comfort and support.

Even the boys love the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic! Justin taking a leap over flowing water above treeline. The Ozonic is also available in a 50 liter men's pack.
Even the boys love the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic! Justin taking a leap over flowing water above treeline. The Ozonic is also available in a 50 liter men's pack.

Jane Jackson

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