≪ Go to our review of Backpacking Water Treatment

Hands-on Gear Review

MSR Trailshot Review

MSR Trailshot
Price:   $50 List | $49.95 at REI
Compare prices at 4 resellers
Pros:  Versatile, durable, easy to use
Cons:  Heavy for trail running, hands get tired
Bottom line:  A great option for someone who does it all and wants their filter to come with them, from backpacking to trail running.
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
Manufacturer:   MSR

Our Verdict

The TrailShot is MSR's newest filter in its extensive line of high-quality products. We think the TrailShot is a versatile, easy to use product that we would bring along on many different activities from day hikes to backpacking trips. We were pleased to discover that this little hand pump works as well as a traditional, larger hand pump filter, but also has the convenience of products like the LifeStraw which allows you to drink directly from the source if you're in a hurry. This little unit allows you to get difficult to reach water sources and is easier to maintain and back flush than most products in this review. It is more tiring to filter lots of water at once than a gravity filter or traditional hand pump, but it is possible.


RELATED REVIEW: Best Backpacking Water Filters and Treatment of 2017


Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Jessica Haist

Last Updated:
Tuesday
May 23, 2017

Share:
We were pleasantly surprised with the TrailShot's performance and think it is very versatile. You can drink from the source with the long hose if you're on the go, or fill up your group's water bottles once you get into camp.

Performance Comparison


Scoring well across the board, the TrailShot is a Jack-of-all-trades kind of filter. We scored it slightly lower in the treatment capacity, speed and ease of use categories simply because it requires a lot of pumping to get your water bottles filled and it takes a while.

The MSR Trailshot allows you to drink directly from the water source and reach more difficult to reach sources.
The MSR Trailshot allows you to drink directly from the water source and reach more difficult to reach sources.

Reliability / Effectiveness


The TrailShot effectively protects you from protozoa, bacteria and cryptosporidium, all the harmful microrganizms you will find in the US and Canada. It does not protect you from viruses, so if you are traveling to developing countries where the water sources may contain harmful viruses you'll need to pick up a chemical treatment like the MSR Aquatabs in addition to using a filter for particulates, or go full boar and the MSR Guardian which purifies for everything.

This little unit seems very sturdy and durable. We think you could bring the TrailShot into the backcountry with you as your only filtration system and it would crank out the clean water with no problem of breaking down. The Katadyn BeFree is much less durable and we would not trust it to bring it along on multi day trips without a backup, however it is half the weight.

The MSR TrailShot and Katadyn BeFree are both marketed for trail running  but the BeFree is much lighter and more compact than the TrailShot.
The MSR TrailShot and Katadyn BeFree are both marketed for trail running, but the BeFree is much lighter and more compact than the TrailShot.

Ease of Use


Relatively easy to use, and if you're a climber it will help with your grip strength! We were able to the TrailShot out of the box and know how to use it immediately. Simply tip the bottom of the hose in your water source, fill up the water chamber with a few pumps and you're off! This pump is different from traditional pumps because you're using your fingers and forearm instead of your arms to pump the water and it can give you a good forearm "pump" if you're filling more than just a small bottle. It's great if you're just drinking from the source and need a few sips of water at a time. If you are looking for a traditional pump that you can use more elbow grease with check out the MSR Sweetwater Microfilter. The TrailShot' is also very easy to backflush but it is hard to tell how effective it actually is since you're just forcing the water back out the hose hole and not forcing it through the filter's fibers.

To backflush the Trail Shot you simply remove the hose and force the water back out the hole in the bottom.
To backflush the Trail Shot you simply remove the hose and force the water back out the hole in the bottom.

We like that the TrailShot's hose allows you to access shallow water or get water from sources with high banks or awkward to reach places. Other filters that allow you to drink from the source like the LifeStraw can be very difficult since your face has to be about 6" away from the source. You can also hook your bladder hose up to the mouth of the TrailShot to fill it directly.

You can use the TrailShot to fill your bladder by plugging the hose end into the mouth piece.
You can use the TrailShot to fill your bladder by plugging the hose end into the mouth piece.

Treatment Capacity


The TrailShot's cartridge life last up to 2000 liters, which is pretty great — the BeFree only lasts up to 1000 and other gravity filters like the Platypus GravityWorks have a cartridge life of 1500 liters. Unlike the LifeStraw you are able to fill up other vessels with the TrailShot, it is not as fast as a gravity filter but almost equal to a filter like the Katadyn Vario.

You can use the TrailShot to fill your group's water bottles  but it takes a little more time and hand strength than other methods.
You can use the TrailShot to fill your group's water bottles, but it takes a little more time and hand strength than other methods.

Speed


We filled one liter in 1 minute and 6 seconds with the TrailShot, but we suspect that with each liter, our progress will get slower and slower as our hands tire. We were pleasantly surprised because it looks like a much smaller quantity of water coming out, but when you start filling a bottle it goes quickly. If you are drinking directly from the source the clean water is immediate and therefore much faster than filling a bottle!

The MSR Trailshot is a hand pump filter that you squeeze with your hands versus using your arms to pump.
The MSR Trailshot is a hand pump filter that you squeeze with your hands versus using your arms to pump.

Weight


On the heavy side for what it is, the TrailShot weighs in at a hefty 5.6 ounces. This is on the heavy side for a product marketed for trail running and we find it a bit bulky for just tossing in a pocket. The Katadyn BeFree is half the weight and much more compact for tossing in your pack or pocket for a day trip. We do think that the TrailShot is a better option for a group filter than something like a heavy pump like the 14.3 ounce Katadyn Hiker Pro and would definitely reach for the TrailShot over this product.

Best Applications


The TrailShot is quite versatile and we would bring it along with on short backpacking trips with two or three people where it would save us weight over something like a heavy hand pump or gravity filter. We would also bring us on day hikes or trail runs, recognizing that if you're doing a lot of high output day trips you may want to choose something like the BeFree. But, if you're looking for something that does it all pretty well, the TrailShot may be the right choice!

Value


Considering that most hand pumps cost in the $90-$350 range, the TrailShot is a screaming deal at $50! We do think that the Sawyer Mini is the best value of the bunch at $25 but this is a close second considering how light and durable it is.

Conclusion


A tough little filter unit that can get you drinkable water from any source in a jiffy, we think the TrailShot is a great all-around choice. It is easy to use, but does require some hand strength to pump large volumes of water. This is a good choice if you want a more lightweight option to replace your old-school hand pump, which you can also use to drink directly out of a water source instead of carrying water with you.

To filter into bottles you can turn the mouth piece around to face out  or face it in to drink directly from it.
To filter into bottles you can turn the mouth piece around to face out, or face it in to drink directly from it.
Jessica Haist

  • Share this article:
You Might Also Like

Where to Buy?

Seller Price sort asc Shipping Cost Visit
REI $49.95 see it
Backcountry $49.95 see it
MooseJaw $49.95 FREE!* see it
Amazon $49.95 Check Site see it

Thinking about buying some gear we've reviewed? Help OutdoorGearLab out if you do. Just click on any of the above seller links and if you make any purchase, the seller will contribute a portion of the sale to help support this site. It won't cost you anything extra, and it's a simple way to help us fund our gear reviews. Thanks!

*Most retailers free shipping offers apply only to lower 48 US states using ground/economy shipping. See retailer's website for details.


OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: June 12, 2017
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (4.0)
Average Customer Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (5.0)

100% of 1 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
2 Total Ratings
5 star: 50%  (1)
4 star: 50%  (1)
3 star: 0%  (0)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)
Sort 1 member reviews by: Most Recent | Most Helpful
Write a Review on this Gear

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
   Jun 12, 2017 - 11:07pm
jasonlivy · Backpacker · Orem, UT
To be honest, I was a little disappointed by the score. Although I understand that much of the score is subjective, I personally believe this filter should be way ahead of the Sawyer in versatility alone. One of my biggest beefs with the Sawyer is it's lack of quality (you really do get what you pay for). Does it filter water? Yes, but it is very apparent to my subjective self that the quality is far below many of the other filters in your test pool (I can't believe it scores higher than the Guardian…unbelievable). However I'm not here to comment on the Sawyer.

I've taken the Trailshot on two week-long backpacking trips (65 miles through Glacier NP, and 80 miles through Canyonlands backcountry), and I came away incredibly impressed! On the Glacier trip, I also brought a GravityWorks filter (my previous favorite which still has a warm place in my heart), but ended up not using it at all. My main concern was whether or not the TrailShot could be used as my main filter, not just a quick fix along the trail. It remarkably met my needs for this use and more. I was averaging slightly more than 1L per minute speed and felt that the weight was very light based on it's versatility (much more than the Sawyer in my opinion). I was also pleasantly surprised that pumping was not that taxing on my hand, and if I was filtering a large amount of water (which happened several times in Canyonlands), I simply swapped hands every so often. I found tired hands to be a non-issue. I loved how easy it is to clean (something that I didn't' see mentioned in your review). All you do is shake it vigorously for 30 sec which extends the life of the filter significantly. In my experience it makes a huge difference and I experienced very little slowing down of the filter after regularly cleaning it over the course of the two backpacking trips.

For anyone to take Sawyer seriously when it says it will filter 100,000 gallons needs a reality check. Especially when every other manufacturer who uses the exact same material is claiming 1,000 to 2,000 liters. It doesn't give me much confidence that anything else they are telling me is true. I hate it when companies manipulate me into buying their product by lying to me. It goes against my own ethics and standards. For this reason alone I will never own a Sawyer.

The bottom line is that this filter should be considered one of the top three filters available when considering its versatility (great for day hikes and multi-day backpacking trips), weight (5oz is comparable to filters like the Hiker or Miniworks, NOT Sawyer and Lifestraw which are much less versatile), longevity (2000L is real, 100,000 gallons is not), and is only $50, one of the best values available. Simply awesome…

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
Help other readers find the most helpful reviews
Was this review helpful to you? 
Yes
 
No


Have you used this product?
Don't hold back. Share your viewpoint by posting a review with your thoughts...

Write a Review on this Gear
 
Where's the Best Price?
Seller Price
REI $49.95
Backcountry $49.95
MooseJaw $49.95
Compare prices at 4 sellers >

*You help support OutdoorGearLab's product testing and reviews by purchasing from our retail partners.


Follow Us


Unbiased.