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Santa Cruz Bronson Carbon S 2019 Review

The Bronson is a ripping descender that is still capable of significant amounts of climbing.
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Price:  $5,199 List | $5,199.00 at Competitive Cyclist
Pros:  Excellent downhill performance, re-worked suspension layout pays dividends, respectable climber
Cons:  Too long to be playful, no climb switch on RockShox Super Deluxe
Manufacturer:   Santa Cruz
By Pat Donahue, Paul Tindal, Joshua Hutchens  ⋅  Sep 6, 2018
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79
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#5 of 22
  • Fun Factor - 25% 8
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 9
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 7
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 6

Our Verdict

The redesigned Santa Cruz Bronson slays downhills and delivers adequate climbing abilities. The Bronson is an intriguing one-bike quiver for downhill-minded trail riders who don't want to ride a full-blown, burly, enduro bike. This bicycle operates well at blistering speeds on both flowy and rough trails while still being capable of a 30+ mile ride. Three testers spent four weeks riding the new Bronson as much as humanly possible. We embarked on all-day epics, attacked the most heinous climbs, and hammered laps at the bike park to determine the key ride characteristics. The Bronson's reworked suspension layout features a Nomad-inspired lower-link shock mount. The new design pays off with impressive small bump compliance and the slightly more linear suspension curve is a nice change. Our Carbon S test bike retails for $5199 with a serviceable build kit. Entry-level aluminum build kits start at $3499.

Color Update
Santa Cruz has updated the Bronson's colors. The Carbon S build we tested is now offered in a Red Tide/Yellow colorway. July 2019


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award 
Price $5,199.00 at Competitive Cyclist$5,099 List$7,199 List$8,299 List$4,899 List
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Pros Excellent downhill performance, re-worked suspension layout pays dividends, respectable climberExcellent climber, aggressive geometry, rim/tire combinationExcellent climbing abilities, impressive downhill performance, high fun factor, tremendous build kitVery stable at speed, hard charging, amazing build, supportive pedal platform, great deep stroke supportLightweight, playful, well-rounded, modern geometry, solid component specification
Cons Too long to be playful, no climb switch on RockShox Super DeluxeExpensive, big impacts are less supportive, handlebars have too much backsweepExpensive, pivots came loose a few times during testingBuild tested is expensive, somewhat less maneuverable than previous version, can feel sluggish at lower speedsNot a brawler, Fox 34 fork can be overwhelmed
Bottom Line The Bronson is a ripping descender that is still capable of significant amounts of climbing.An aggressive 29er with geometry to get rad while retaining a sporty and nimble feelA fantastic trail bike that blends superb climbing abilities with fun and well-rounded downhill performance.The recently updated Santa Cruz Hightower is longer, slacker, and harder charging than ever.We loved the old version, but believe it or not, the new Ibis Ripley is even better.
Rating Categories Santa Cruz Bronson Carbon S Ibis Ripmo GX Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 Santa Cruz Hightower CC XO1 Ibis Ripley GX Eagle
Fun Factor (25%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
Downhill Performance (35%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
7
Climbing Performance (35%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
Ease Of Maintenance (5%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Specs Santa Cruz Bronson... Ibis Ripmo GX Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 Santa Cruz... Ibis Ripley GX Eagle
Wheel size 27.5" 29" 29" 29" 29"
Suspension & Travel Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) - 150mm DW-Link - 145mm Switch Infinity - 130mm Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) - 140mm DW-Link - 120mm
Measured Weight (w/o pedals) 30 lbs 13 oz (Large) 29 lbs 7 oz (Large) 29 lbs 9 oz (Large) 29 lbs 13 oz (Large) 28 lbs 14 oz (Large)
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select+ 160mm Fox 36 Performance - 160mm, 36mm stanchions Fox 36 Factory - 150mm 36mm stanchions RockShox Lyrik Ultimate 150mm Fox Float 34 Performance 130mm 34mm stanchions
Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ Fox DPX2 Performance Elite Fox DPX2 Factory RockShox Super Deluxe Select Ultimate Fox Float Performance DPS EVOL
Frame Material Carbon Fiber "C" Carbon Fiber Carbon Fiber "TURQ" Carbon Fiber "CC" Carbon Fiber
Frame Size Large Large Large Large Large
Frame Settings Flip Chip N/A N/A Flip Chip N/A
Available Sizes XS-XL S-XL S-XL S-XXL S-XL
Wheelset Race Face AR Offset 30 with DT 370 hubs Ibis 938 Aluminum Rims 34mm ID w/ Ibis Hubs DT Swiss M1700, 30mm ID w/ DT Swiss 350 hub Santa Cruz Reserve 30 Carbon Rims w/ DT 350 hubs Ibis 938 Aluminum Rims 34mm ID w/ Ibis Hubs
Front Tire Maxxis Minion DHF EXO TR 2.5" Maxxis Minion DHF WT 29 x 2.5" Maxxis Minion DHF WT 29 x 2.5" Maxxis Minion DHR II 3C EXO TR 2.4" Schwable Hans Dampf 2.6"
Rear Tire Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO TR 2.4" Maxxis Aggressor WT 29 x 2.5" Maxxis Aggressor 29 x 2.3 Maxxis Minion DHR II 3C EXO TR 2.4" Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.6"
Shifters SRAM GX Eagle SRAM GX Eagle SRAM XO Eagle SRAM XO1 Eagle SRAM GX Eagle
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle SRAM GX Eagle 12-Speed SRAM X0 Eagle SRAM XO1 Eagle SRAM GX Eagle
Crankset SRAM Stylo 7K 148 DUB 175mm 32T SRAM Descendant 30t SRAM X0 Eagle Carbon 30T SRAM X1 Eagle DUB 170mm(size Large) 30T SRAM Descendant Alloy 32T
Saddle WTB Silverado Pro WTB Silverado WTB Volt WTB Silverado Team WTB Silverado 142mm
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 170mm KS LEV-SI-150mm Fox Transfer 150mm RockShox Reverb Stealth Bike Yoke Revive 160mm
Handlebar Race Face Aeffect R 780mm Ibis Aluminum Bar - 780mm Yeti Carbon - 780mm Santa Cruz AM Carbon - 800mm Ibis 780mm Alloy
Stem Race Face Aeffect R 50mm Ibis 3D Forged Stem 50mm w/ 31.8mm Clamp RaceFace Aeffect R 35 Race Face Aeffect R 50mm Ibis 31.8mm 50mm
Brakes SRAM Code R Shimano Deore XT Shimano XT M8000 SRAM Code RSC Shimano Deore 2 Piston
Measured Effective Top Tube (mm) 625 628 628 619 625
Measured Reach (mm) 460 473 477 470 475
Measured Head Tube Angle 65.3-degrees H / 65.0-degrees L 65.8-degrees 65.1-degrees 65.55-degrees H / 65.25-degrees L 66.5-degrees
Measured Seat Tube Angle 75.1-degrees H / 74.8-degrees L 76.1-degrees 76.8-degrees 76.8-degrees H / 76.3-degrees L 76.2-degrees
Measured Bottom Bracket Height (mm) 342 H / 339 L 343 335 340 338
Measured Wheelbase (mm) 1215 1220 1231 1230 1210
Measured Chain Stay Length (mm) 432 436 438 435 434
Warranty Lifetime Seven Years Lifetime Lifetime Seven Years

Our Analysis and Test Results

Should I Buy This Bike?


The Bronson is a very intriguing option for riders who prefer 27.5-inch wheels and value downhill performance above all but still want to retain respectable climbing abilities. Riders who don't want to pedal a full-blown enduro bike around will love this bike. The Bronson slays most downhills save for the true double-black diamond rock gardens. This bicycle has no problem cranking out a 4000-foot+ day of climbing although this kind of ride certainly wouldn't be our first choice. The reworked suspension layout with the lower-link shock mount delivers a slightly more linear feel and improved small bump feel. This is a significant improvement over the outgoing model.

This redesigned bike is very capable of getting rad.
This redesigned bike is very capable of getting rad.

Riders who want to save some cash and who value increased climbing performance should check out the the super affordable YT Jeffsy AL Base. The Jeffsy can't touch the Bronson on the descent, but it is a better choice for longer rides. The Jeffsy only has 10mm less travel front and rear but feels more zippy and nimble due to more conservative geometry. It's also available in both 27.5" and 29" wheel sizes. The best part? The Jeffsy starts at $2299 with a solid component specification for the price with carbon framed models ranging in price from $3,499 up to $5,499.

Riders who want a user-friendly 29er will love the redesigned Specialized Stumpjumper 29. The Stumpjumper is a better option for less aggressive folks who want to ride a wide range of terrain. This 140mm 29er can't touch the top-end downhill performance of the Bronson, but it offers better climbing abilities and is much more user-friendly. The conservative geometry doesn't require high speeds or an aggressive pilot to unlock its abilities. In addition, the safety net of the wagon wheels make up for some questionable line choices. We tested the $4200 Comp Carbon 29 with a slightly inferior build kit compared to the Bronson.

High-speed corners are incredibly fun on this bicycle.
High-speed corners are incredibly fun on this bicycle.

Want an aggressive, long-travel, 29er? The new Ibis Ripmo shreds hard while retaining an athletic feel. This 145mm 29er climbs very well, descends well, and maintains a very sporty rear end. The Ripmo can't quite match the top-end downhill performance of the Bronson, but it isn't terribly far off. The Ibis is a far better climber with its steep seat tube angle and wagon-wheels. In addition, the Ripmo has a more lively and sporty rear end and feels a bit more like a beefed-up trail bike rather than a scaled-down enduro bike.

Frame Design


The Bronson has 150mm of rear-wheel travel and runs Santa Cruz' Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) suspension platform. This dual-link system has a link just above the bottom bracket and another about halfway up the seat tube. As the bike dives into its travel, the two links rotate in opposite directions. Traditionally, VPP is known for a firm and efficient pedal platform and poor small bump compliance. We found the new suspension layout improves small bump compliance significantly.

The all-new Bronson uses a lower link shock mount like its big brother  the Nomad.
The all-new Bronson uses a lower link shock mount like its big brother, the Nomad.

We measured our large test bike in both geometry settings.

In the high mode, our bike has a 625mm top tube and 460mm reach. The head tube angle is 65.3 degrees and the seat tube angle is 75.1-degrees. The bottom bracket height is 342mm.

In the low mode, we measured a 623mm effective top tube and a 456mm reach. The head tube angle is 65.0-degrees and the seat tube angle is 74.8-degrees. The bottom bracket height is 339mm.

The chainstays measure 432mm and the wheelbase is 1215mm. Our large test bike hit the scales and came in at 30-lbs 13 ounces set up tubeless without pedals.

You can do pretty much anything on this bike  save for the nastiest rock gardens.
You can do pretty much anything on this bike, save for the nastiest rock gardens.

Design Highlights


-Accepts 27.5-inch or 27.5-plus wheels
-150mm rear wheel travel
-Designed around 160mm fork
-1x drivetrains only
-Redesigned suspension layout with lower-link shock mount
-Flip-chip geometry adjustment

-Lifetime frame warranty

Given its length  the Bronson is not the most playful bike. But the Bronson can still send a respectable gap.
Given its length, the Bronson is not the most playful bike. But the Bronson can still send a respectable gap.

Downhill Performance


The Bronson is a downhill shredder that remains confident at blistering speeds. Motoring down flow trails and charging over chunder is incredibly fun. The suspension design remains composed and the new linkage feels excellent. Given the length of the bike, it isn't all that playful. Boosting jumps, stumps and rolls in the trail can be a little awkward. The Carbon S build kit works well save for the poor hub engagement on the DT 370 hubs.

We rode this bike in both geometry settings. For a bike intended to get rad, it is simply better in the low mode. Ripping this beautifully burly blue bicycle in the high setting felt a little less stable and less confident while not adding much in the ways of climbing efficiency.

The redesigned Bronson shreds much harder than its predecessor. Once this bike is up to speed it is remarkably stable and confident. You can push the Bronson pretty darn hard before it stutters. When feeding it down flow trails this bike has the nerves to go faster and faster. Make no mistake, this bike does have limitations on the truly rowdy terrain. At the bike park, some of the double-black diamond rock gardens will cause problems. This shouldn't come as a huge surprise for a bike with 150mm of travel. In these steep and chunky situations, the geometry holds up well-enough but the suspension can get overwhelmed and it is hard to hold a line.

The Maxxis Minion DHF front tire is plenty aggressive
The Maxxis Minion DHF front tire is plenty aggressive

Santa Cruz states the "new lower-link shock configuration opens up greater possibilities for maximum bump performance, a supportive mid-stroke, and a barely detectable bottom out". In the FAQ section, Santa Cruz says "coil shocks will work on the Bronson "but we recommend an air shock. While progressive, the suspension is biased towards air shocks and not quite progressive enough to work well with a coil". There is a lot of information floating around in those quotes. The main takeaway should be that the new Bronson is more linear with better bump compliance. We find this to be accurate on all levels. Here at OutdoorGearLab, we have tested several Santa Cruz bikes over the years and the new-Bronson, along with the new Nomad, have the best small to mid-size small bump compliance. Bikes like the old Hightower LT and the previous version of the Bronson have always stood up well to bigger hits, but motoring over chatter was never a strong suit. Much of the trail surface was transferred to the rider and it almost feels like your shock is in the firm or climb position. This new lower-link suspension layout works very well. The Bronson feels excellent over roots, small rocks, and bomb holes.

Given the less progressive/more linear design, it would be logical to think deep stroke support suffers. We found it easier to blow through the travel at 30-35% sag. We never experienced a harsh, frightening, bottom out, but you could definitely get through the travel. This may sound like a negative, but it is nice riding a bike that uses its full-travel rather than only using 70% of a bike's available travel. If you have 150mm to play with, why not use it? It does seem like Santa Cruz' recommendation to forgo a coil shock has merit.

High-speed chunder  the Bronson handles it.
High-speed chunder, the Bronson handles it.

Downhill handling is solid. The frame is stiff and it responds to minimal rider input. Dip your shoulder into a corner and the bike reacts. Slow corners and tighter sections of trail can be problematic and bit awkward given the 1215mm wheelbase.

The Bronson isn't a particularly playful bicycle. It is simply too long to want to come off the ground. This lengthy wheelbase and slack front end don't allow the bike to fit on the face of jumps all that well. When hopping off a lip, it feels like there is a long delay from when your front end leaves the lip and when the rear wheel finally makes it over. Coming off drops, this is even more disconcerting. A rider just hopping aboard the Bronson may find it takes more speed to negate this long-wheelbase on drops. This bike is far more happy hauling down your favorite single track and slaying high-speed berms.

The build kit on the $5199 Carbon S kit worked well on the descent. The Fox Performance 36 with GRIP damper is worlds better than the 34 version with the same damper. It was easy to set up the fork to balance small bump feel and deep stroke support. The RockShox Super Deluxe R is an excellent performer. The DT 370 hubs have poor engagement. When trying to slip in pedal strokes on the descent, there can be an audible clunk after you finally get through the dead spots in the hub. The Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR II combination was fantastic as always. Say what you will about the RockShox Reverb, but the 170mm drop is fantastic.

Climbing abilities are solid  although tight uphill corners can be problematic.
Climbing abilities are solid, although tight uphill corners can be problematic.

Climbing Performance


The Bronson is a decent climber given how radical it gets on the descent. There is certainly no mistaking this bike for a mid-travel bike when grinding uphill, but the suspension design is efficient and utilizes rider energy relatively well. This isn't our first choice for full-day epic rides but it scoots uphill surprisingly well. The RockShox Super Deluxe R doesn't have a climb switch which is an annoying inconvenience as it can be beneficial in certain situations.

The Bronson sets you up in a nice climbing position. The 75.1/74.8-degree seat tube angle is on the slacker side of the spectrum by today's standards. You aren't exactly smack dab on top of the crank, but you're also not terribly far behind it. Power transfer is reasonable and the 460mm reach measurement on our large bike strikes a nice balance of not stretching you out while not feeling cramped.

When putting the power down the Bronson's suspension design remains calm. With the redesigned suspension layout delivering a more linear ride and better bump compliance, we expected to see reduced climbing efficiency. This wasn't the case. If we gaze down towards the shock when grinding uphill, there is little movement. When you need to stand up and get on the gas, the suspension retains its calm feel. The slack angles don't exactly give off an ultra-efficient feel, but the bike powers uphill well enough. It wouldn't be our top choice, but we have no problem taking the Bronson on 30-mile rides with 4000-feet of climbing.

This bike offers enduro bike capability and a more trim package.
This bike offers enduro bike capability and a more trim package.

The 1215mm wheelbase creates an interesting climbing feel. In a straight line up a technical section of trail, the added length gives you a long, stable, rock crawling feel. Just line the bike up, punch it, and the Bronson goes right up and over. Tighter moves are more difficult. Rock gardens or root infested zones where you have to cut back and forth across the trail or get creative with line choice can be problematic. We wouldn't necessarily call this bike especially bulky or clumsy, but it is definitely not nimble.

The SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain was fine and the Maxxis Minions hook up very nicely on the climb. We take issue with the RockShox Super Deluxe R not having a climb switch. The suspension is calm on this bike and you don't really need a climb switch on singletrack. That said, it would still be beneficial on fire road or pavement. The technology is there for RockShox to include a climb switch on the entry-level Super Deluxe R, they should use it.

Photo Tour


The Fox 34 Performance is a solid performer.
The SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain works fine. We wish the Super Deluxe shock had a climb switch.

Value


At $5199, the Bronson offers excellent downhill performance, respectable climbing, and the build kit is decent. This bike is an average value for the rider who wants an aggressive 27.5" bike that still climbs pretty well. The performance is definitely there, but it will cost you. Yes, the frame and suspension design is definitely dialed, but there are some interesting competitors available at significantly lower prices.

The Bronson is a versatile bike comfortable on a wide range of terrain.
The Bronson is a versatile bike comfortable on a wide range of terrain.

Conclusion


Santa Cruz nailed it with the all-new Bronson. This bike is perfect for the aggressive rider who wants an excellent descender that retains respectable climbing abilities. This 150mm bike in an impressive entry into the enduro-light or aggressive trail category. The Bronson is an excellent choice for the rider who values downhill performance above all but doesn't want to take the plunge to a full-blown, burly, enduro bike.


Pat Donahue, Paul Tindal, Joshua Hutchens