The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Specialized Atlas Pro Review

A clean and functional option for the rider who wants a pedal-friendly pair of mountain bike shorts.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $95 List
Pros:  Minimalist look, lightweight, quality feel
Cons:  Clumsy and poorly placed waistband adjustment, pricey
Manufacturer:   Specialized
By Pat Donahue ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  May 29, 2019
  • Share this article:
74
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 16
  • Comfort - 20% 9
  • Fit and Pedal Friendliness - 20% 9
  • Features - 20% 6
  • Durability - 20% 6
  • Style - 10% 8
  • Protection - 10% 6

Our Verdict

The Specialized Atlas Pro shorts deliver exceptional comfort, a high-quality feel, and a trim fit. Specialized nailed the style with a nice, clean, minimalist look while still retaining some functional features making them an excellent choice for everyday trail riding. They breathe well, are pedal-friendly, and sit just above the knee. The Atlas shorts are not the perfect pair of shorts; the waistband adjustment system isn't especially user-friendly. The adjustment system is located inside of a pocket on the rear of the pant at the waistband. We will discuss this in more detail, but it is simply not an easy adjustment to make on the fly. At $95, the Atlas are reasonably priced. They are an attractive and highly functional pair of shorts with a quality feel. These shorts do not come with a chamois, or liner short.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award  Top Pick Award 
Price $95 List$130 List$155 List$89.00 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare at 2 sellers
$69.97 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
74
100
0
80
100
0
80
100
0
76
100
0
76
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Minimalist look, lightweight, quality feelFunctional slim fit, great features, SWAT bibs included, good valueLightweight, ventilated, articulated fit, quality construction, thoughtful designStylish, functions well with knee pads, high-quality and reasonable priceLightweight, comfortable, tailored fit, adjustable waist closure, quick drying
Cons Clumsy and poorly placed waistband adjustment, priceyNot the best quality controlExpensive, short inseamMinimal waistband adjustment, over-complicated closure systemTailored fit may be too slim for some
Bottom Line A clean and functional option for the rider who wants a pedal-friendly pair of mountain bike shorts.The Specialized Enduro Pro shorts are fully featured with a functional high performance design and come with SWAT bibs.They are expensive, but Kitsbow's quality construction, attention to detail, and high performance design can't be beat.A dialed all-mountain/enduro short that ticks most of the boxes but has some major waistband issuesPatagonia's Dirt Roamer shorts are comfortable and lightweight with a minimalist design and performance oriented tailored fit.
Rating Categories Specialized Atlas Pro Specialized Enduro Pro Kitsbow Mescal Ventilated 100% Airmatic Patagonia Dirt Roamer
Comfort (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
Fit And Pedal Friendliness (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
9
Features (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
Durability (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
7
Style (10%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
Protection (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
6
Specs Specialized Atlas... Specialized Enduro... Kitsbow Mescal... 100% Airmatic Patagonia Dirt...
Shell Fabric VaporRize stretch woven Water-repellent VaporRize woven fabric 4-way stretch softshell, mesh vent panels Polyester elastane stretch blend 4-way stretch 90 denier 87% recycled polyester/13% spandex with a DWR
Lining Main Fabric None Removeable SWAT liner chamois None CyTech Premium None
Chamois None Body Geometry Mountain None Foam pad None, but compatible with Endless Ride Chamois(sold separately)
Inseam Measurement (inches) 14.5 in 13.5 in 12.5 in 12 in 11.5 in
Number of pockets 3 2 2 2 1
Removable Inner Short? No Yes No No No
Weight (ounces) 7.25 oz 9.73 oz 9.24 oz 8.76 oz 5.22 oz
Weight Liner N/a 7.51 oz N/a N/a N/a

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Atlas Pro shorts offer exceptional aesthetics and excellent on-trail performance. They tick most of the boxes for what you are looking for in a trail short. A few key gripes are the waist adjustment system and the slightly high price tag. These significant negatives keep these shorts from reaching their full potential.

Performance Comparison


The Atlas Pro shorts have a nice  simple  appearance
The Atlas Pro shorts have a nice, simple, appearance

Comfort


The Atlas Pro Shorts are exceptionally comfortable. The materials are soft and pleasant on the skin. While some other shorts have a more artificial feel to them, the Specialized shorts feel excellent against the body. There are absolutely no tight points that cause discomfort. As you work through the motion of a pedal stroke, the shorts remain comfortable.

The waistband is soft against the body and doesn't have any abrasion-prone features. The waistband is on the thinner side of the spectrum. It can roll and twist a little bit if you are wearing a hip pack. When the hip pack strap moves around on top of the short's waistband, it can create a little bunching. We often prefer broader/wider waistbands for this reason.

The Atlas Pro shorts do not come with a chamois. These padded chamois liners are an essential element in determining comfort level. Expect the saddle comfort to rely heavily on your choice of a chamois.

When perched in the downhill position  the shorts sit just above the knee.
When perched in the downhill position, the shorts sit just above the knee.

Fit and Pedal Friendliness


Specialized knocked it out of the park with the pedal-friendliness of the Atlas Pro shorts. The lightweight materials create a free range of motion. While some shorts are constructed with materials that feel restrictive, these allow for natural movements.

The 14.5-inch inseam makes it so these shorts sit just about at the knee. This is a critical feature when evaluating a short for its pedal-friendliness. Not having material sitting on top of your knee cap serves a few purposes. First, it promotes airflow going up your short, which helps keep you cool and helps keep you spinning those pedals for longer periods. Second, there is no material bouncing around the knee with every pedal stroke. Longer shorts often flap around with each pedal stroke. While this may sound overblown, sometimes it takes wearing a short with less of an inseam to notice the difference. The Troy Lee Designs Skyline and Patagonia Dirt Roamer shorts are other pairs of shorts with a slimmer and shorter fit.

The trim fit does not restrict your pedal motion.
The trim fit does not restrict your pedal motion.

The trim fit also serves to keep the short materials closer to the leg. This minimizes movement of excess material while not feeling uncomfortably snug or tight. These shorts offer a high-end fit for the daily trail rider. Riders who have bulkier, thicker legs may want to consider other options as we could see these being too tight for some people.

One item regarding the fit that should be touched on is the poor waist adjustment design. This isn't purely a matter of fit. It is more of a feature issue. That said, this feature has a significant effect on fit. These shorts are hard to adjust to the proper fit. Once you have it dialed, you can leave the waistband alone.

Features


Despite the minimalist look, these shorts do have some with modern features. They have carefully placed ventilation points, interesting pocket placement, and a unique adjustment system. We found these features mostly worked well, but we took serious issue with the adjustment system.

The Atlas Pro Shorts have loads of ventilation points. These laser-cut perforations are intended to generate a bit of airflow when things get sweaty on an extended summer ride. These ventilation points are located on the front of the shorts in below the crotch and towards the inside of the leg. It is difficult to solely attribute the excellent airy qualities of these shorts to these perforations, but these shorts do breathe exceptionally well. Therefore, we can call these ventilation points a useful feature.

The two front pockets will fit a small-medium sized cell phone.
The two front pockets will fit a small-medium sized cell phone.

The Specialized shorts have well-placed pockets, but some will find them a touch too small. The two main pockets are located on the front of the short on top of the quads. Using these pockets can seem a little awkward and clumsy when standing at the trailhead. That said, when you are riding, your cell phone stays flat against your leg and doesn't flop around constantly. Riders with larger cell phones will definitely have trouble fitting them in these pockets. An iPhone 5 fits in there with little room to spare. Larger iPhones or Samsung Galaxy phones might not fit.

The third pocket is located on the waistband on the rear of the short just under the small of the back. This pocket is marginally larger. Still, bigger cellular telephones will not fit. A bar or a snack may fit in there well with a multi-tool or C02 inflator. The location of this pocket is fine, although it can be difficult to access on the fly. Since you can't see the pocket or the zipper, it can be challenging.

The waistband adjustment system is difficult to use.
The waistband adjustment system is difficult to use.

The rear pocket also houses the waist adjustment system. Inside this pocket, you will find two tabs that you can pull to tighten the shorts. This adjustment system is challenging to use. While most shorts have some external tabs, this system requires you to remove anything in your back pocket and then fiddle with two tabs inside of a small pocket. It seems like Specialized was so fixated on a clean and simple look, they ended up with an over-complicated and non-user-friendly system. It doesn't make sense to have an adjustment system located where you can't see it, let alone hiding within a pocket that is very hard to reach.

Riders who tend to use their pockets quite a bit may find these shorts don't have sufficient amounts of space. Also, the pockets are on the smaller side. If you carry a cell phone, a multi-tool, and some keys, you are just about maxed out. That said, most riders still use some sort of bag or hip pack that house such things.

The rear of the short continues the simple and clean approach.
The rear of the short continues the simple and clean approach.

Durability


Durability is a key consideration when purchasing a pair of shorts. Riding apparel can get spendy in a hurry, and the Atlas Pro shorts aren't cheap. We found them to hold up well throughout our testing period, and we have no major concerns with them withstanding the test of time.

The area of your shorts that are in contact with your saddle is always an area of concern when evaluating durability. This is the zone that experiences the most friction and movement against the saddle. The Specialized shorts don't show any substantial wear. There is some very minor fraying around a horizontal seam on the upper rear of the short. It is difficult to tell whether this is the seam deteriorating or just a little wear on the fabric surrounding the seam. We lean towards the latter.

Zippers and the snap closure system are always an area worth some attention. The zippers functioned effectively, and we have seen no evidence that they will fail. The junction of the short-material and the zippers appears to be flawlessly executed. None of the zipper teeth appear damaged or worn.

The fit is relatively trim and fitted.
The fit is relatively trim and fitted.

Style


Specialized nailed it with the styling of these shorts. They did a bang-up job delivering a clean-looking and simple short. The term minimalist comes to mind when you look at the Atlas Pro shorts. The four strategically placed pockets fly under the radar. Upon first glance, the pockets blend in quite well.

The trim fit and slightly shorter legs are a matter of preference, but testers to found them to be stylish on top of their functional nature. Manufacturers have come out with dozens of more slender shorts that bridge the gap between full-on baggy shorts and tight, road-inspired, lycra shorts. If you ask us, this clean and trim look is flattering, and not having a bunch of extra material hanging in the wind is a nice look. The Patagonia Dirt Roamer, Kitsbow Mescal Ventilated, Fox Flexair, andTroy Lee Designs Skyline offer the same trim styling.

There are no tacky designs or huge logos on the Atlas Pro shorts. We appreciate this aesthetic. The lack of text or funky multi-colored designs makes these shorts stand out and keeps your eyes fixated on the killer fit and clean styling.

Laser-cut perforations allow for impressive airflow.
Laser-cut perforations allow for impressive airflow.

Protection


Protective features are typically found on more enduro-oriented shorts. This may include attachments for hip-pads, materials that won't cut in the event of a crash, and extended coverage. The Atlas Pro shorts were designed for daily trail riding and have none of these protective features. Specialized set out to design a lightweight trail short, and that is exactly what they delivered. We can't fault them for the lack of protective features.

The lightweight VapoRize fabric is soft and light. We didn't crash in these shorts, but we don't have much confidence in this fabric surviving a high-speed crash. Again, these are intended to be trail shorts for long XC rides and are not built to get super rowdy.

Specialized states that the "14.5 inseam with tapered leg fit (size 34" waist) falls just above the knees, leaving room for pads without interfering on climbs." While the leg is tapered and there is ample space in the leg opening to fit a kneepad, they are just a little too short. Use with knee pads could lead to a substantial gap between the shorts and the pads.

The Atlas Pro shorts are incredibly pedal-friendly.
The Atlas Pro shorts are incredibly pedal-friendly.

Best Applications


The Atlas Pro Shorts are best for the trail rider who wants a simple pair of shorts with a trim fit. The lightweight and pedal-friendly nature of these shorts standout on long rides with loads of climbing. The ideal rider might trend a little bit towards the cross country-leaning trail rider as opposed to the enduro-leaning trail rider.

If you like the super-baggy or relaxed look, you should look elsewhere. Also, these are not the best choice for use with knee pads as the fit is a little bit shorter and slimmer. Riders who want a short that would stand up a little bit better to crashing should look for a burlier pair of riding shorts.

Value


At $95, the Atlas Pro Shorts are an average value. They do not come with a chamois or padded liner. Some people may be irritated at the lack of chamois at this price. Still, the Specialized shorts are well-designed and standout as an excellent choice for pedaling heavy trail riders. You can certainly find less expensive mountain bike shorts, but few of those shorts would share the same design qualities.

Conclusion


The Specialized Atlas Pro Shorts deliver exceptional comfort in a pedal friendly package. The shorter and more trim fit might be somewhat of a polarizing topic in terms of the style. That said, this design delivers superb on-trail pedaling performance. The features of these shorts appear to be thoughtfully and tastefully designed, but the waistband adjustment system is not user-friendly and requires emptying one of the few pockets to access it. All-in-all, these are a solid option for pure trail riding that the minimalists will love.


Pat Donahue