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Bontrager Blaze WaveCel Review

An expensive fully-featured half shell helmet that comes equipped with Bontrager's WaveCel technology
Bontrager Blaze WaveCel
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Price:  $300 List | $300.00 at REI
Pros:  Adjustable visor, magnetic buckle, magnetic accessory mount, WaveCel
Cons:  Expensive, moderately heavy, somewhat bulky and bulbous appearance
Manufacturer:   Trek
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 24, 2019
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80
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 23
  • Protection - 25% 9
  • Comfort - 20% 8
  • Ventilation - 20% 7
  • Features - 15% 9
  • Weight - 10% 5
  • Durability - 10% 9

Our Verdict

The Blaze is an intriguing helmet that features Bontrager's WaveCel impact protection technology. This feature-packed helmet has a magnetic Fidlock buckle, magnetic accessory mount, adjustable visor, and a Boa fit adjustment system. It has extended coverage that comes down low on the temporal lobe, across the forehead, and relatively low on the occipital lobe/back of the head. The real story is the WaveCel construction, which is a layer of a cellular structure within an outer EPS shell that Bontrager claims to absorb impact while also working as a slip plane to reduce rotational forces on the brain. While this WaveCel technology may enhance protection, it does reduce the effectiveness of the Blaze's ventilation while adding significant weight to the helmet. It's also the most expensive half-shell helmet we've ever tested, though riders seeking the utmost protection may be able to justify the expense.

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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Adjustable visor, magnetic buckle, magnetic accessory mount, WaveCelAmazing ventilation, comfortable, dual-shell protection, good head coverage, feature-packedLots of safety certifications, enhanced protective features, well ventilated, deep fit with lots of coverageReasonably priced, comfortable, innovative sweat management system, MIPS, adjustable visorInexpensive, comfortable, versatile fit, durable
Cons Expensive, moderately heavy, somewhat bulky and bulbous appearanceAverage weight, expensiveExpensive, moderate weight, visor design doesn't block low sun angles that well, helmet shell may conflict with some sunglass armsModerately heavy, ventilation could be better, buckle failure in previous Consumer Reports testingLacks standout features, slightly heavy
Bottom Line An expensive fully-featured half shell helmet that comes equipped with Bontrager's WaveCel technologyAn incredibly airy and well-designed helmet that lives up to its high price tagPOC continues to push the envelope of protection and safety with this new fully-featured, high coverage half-shellAn affordable, quality helmet that checks most of our boxes at a reasonable priceThis helmet provides a high level of comfort and competitive performance at a wallet-friendly price
Rating Categories Bontrager Blaze Wav... Giro Manifest Spher... POC Kortal Race MIPS Bell 4Forty MIPS Giro Chronicle MIPS
Protection (25%)
9.0
9.0
10.0
8.0
8.0
Comfort (20%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
9.0
Ventilation (20%)
7.0
10.0
9.0
7.0
7.0
Features (15%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
7.0
6.0
Weight (10%)
5.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Durability (10%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
Specs Bontrager Blaze Wav... Giro Manifest Spher... POC Kortal Race MIPS Bell 4Forty MIPS Giro Chronicle MIPS
Rotational Impact Protection System? WaveCel MIPS Spherical MIPS Integra MIPS MIPS
Weight (Ounces, Grams) 16.40 oz, 465g, size Large 14.1 oz, 401g size L 14.14 oz, 401g size M/L 14.32 oz, 406g size Large 14.5 oz, 410g, size Large
Number of vents 13 19 17 15 14
Goggle or Sunglasses Integration? Yes Integrated eyewear grippers Yes Goggle integration No
Adjustable Visor? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Sizes S, M, L S, M, L XS/SM, M/L L/XL S, M, L S, M, L
Certifications CPSC CPSC Bicycle for ages 5+, CE EN1078 CPSC Bicycle for ages 5+, EN1078, Dutch NTA 8776 e-bike, AS/NZS 2063 CPSC Bicycle for ages 5+ CPSC Bicycle for ages 5+, CE EN1078
Virginia Tech Helmet Safety Rating (if applicable) 5-star 5-star 5-star

Our Analysis and Test Results

Bontrager is a components and accessories brand that is owned by Trek bicycles. They make everything from clothing to wheels and tires and they unveiled their new line of helmets featuring WaveCel technology in the spring of 2019. The release of these helmets and the new technology came with grand safety claims and lots of marketing hype. We're always interested in the latest and greatest in mountain bike helmet technology, so we got our hands on the Blaze helmet to see if it's worth the high asking price and how it compares to our competitive field of mountain bike helmets.

Performance Comparison


Bontrager's new Blaze helmet has extended coverage, loads of...
Bontrager's new Blaze helmet has extended coverage, loads of features, and WaveCel technology.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Protection


It seems like it was Bontrager's intention to make the Blaze as protective as possible and we feel that protection is one of this helmet's strongest suits. It offers ample coverage, a sturdy feeling construction, and comes equipped with Bontrager's new WaveCel technology. Coverage is quite good for a half-shell helmet and the shell comes down quite low on the temples and sides of the head with a relatively deep fit that also sits lower on the forehead than most helmets we've tested. The shell doesn't drop quite as low on the occipital lobe at the back of the head as the models with the most coverage, but it comes down low enough to feel protective enough. The chinstrap and Boa fit adjustment also do a great job of securing the helmet on your head.

The Blaze is definitely an extended coverage half-shell helmet...
The Blaze is definitely an extended coverage half-shell helmet. Temporal lobe coverage is very good, occipital lobe coverage is also solid but not as deep as some other competitors.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Bontrager claims their WaveCel technology is up to 48x more effective than traditional foam in terms of impact protection. WaveCel equipped helmets also received a 5-star rating in Virginia Tech's safety rating system. There is a fair amount of speculation and information available online about the function of the WaveCel system, so we recommend doing a little research before blindly trusting the marketers pushing to sell products. One thing we can say for sure is that we like to see companies pushing innovation in safety and we feel that WaveCel is a good example of that.

Looking inside the Blaze, you can see the unique WaveCel structure.
Looking inside the Blaze, you can see the unique WaveCel structure.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

So how does it work? Without doing any crash testing or impact testing of our own, it's hard for us to judge how well this system works in the real world. We understand the idea behind it, so we'll do our best to explain. WaveCel is a layer of a unique cellular structure that sits within an outer shell of traditional EPS foam. At first glance, it is very reminiscent of the Koroyd that you see inside of some Smith helmets. As the name suggests, however, WaveCel is made in the shape of waves and has larger gaps in the structure. Bontrager claims that this layer performs three functions in the event of an impact, flex, crumple, and glide. According to them, WaveCel works as both an impact absorber and a slip-plane to reduce the rotational forces on the brain in the event of an oblique impact. Based on simple observation and feel, it seems like it would take a pretty significant impact to make the WaveCel act like a slip plane compared to a MIPS liner that moves more freely.

The Blaze definitely has a slightly bulkier and more bulbous...
The Blaze definitely has a slightly bulkier and more bulbous appearance to it, a result of integrating the WaveCel within the outer shell.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Comfort


The Blaze offers a very high degree of comfort. One of our testers put it on at the office and was so comfortable that he drove himself all the way home before realizing it was still on his head. We found it to have a relatively crowd-pleasing fit that works with a variety of head shapes, with ample adjustability to dial it in to your preferences. While it is quite comfortable, the overall fit seems a little less refined than the most comfortable models we tested.

The Boa adjustment dial provides plenty of adjustment to dial in the...
The Boa adjustment dial provides plenty of adjustment to dial in the fit of the Blaze.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The fit of the Blaze helmet can be adjusted using the Boa dial at the back of the helmet. The Boa dial sits in the center of a wide plastic cradle and provides a huge range of adjustment. The dial is large and easy to turn, even with gloves on, and pulls tension evenly from both sides. The plastic cradle can be adjusted up and down on a five-position ladder inside the helmet so that you can optimize its position on your occipital lobe. The chinstrap system works just fine, but we feel it isn't quite as dialed as some of the competition. The straps are attached securely on the inside of the helmet and drop down in front and behind the ear on each side to a basic locking V strap splitter.

The Blaze is undoubtedly a comfortable helmet that is suitable for...
The Blaze is undoubtedly a comfortable helmet that is suitable for any length or style of riding.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The Blaze comes with two sets of pads. The pads appear to be roughly the same thickness and density, but one of them has a bead of silicone across the brow that is intended to manage sweat and prevent it from dripping down your face. We tested both pads and found them to provide similar levels of comfort, and the "no sweat" pad did seriously reduce the amount of sweat running down the face and dripping onto sunglass lenses.

The 13 vents do a reasonable job of ventilating the Blaze, although...
The 13 vents do a reasonable job of ventilating the Blaze, although airflow is seriously reduced by the WaveCel material.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Ventilation


The Blaze falls around the middle of the pack in terms of its ventilation. We will admit that it has more airflow than we expected considering the fact that none of the vents are completely open. Much like the Koroyd in a Smith helmet, WaveCel is designed to absorb impact and also allow for airflow, though both technologies do have the unfortunate side effect of reducing overall ventilation. Fortunately, the WaveCel design is a bit more open than that of the Koroyd and the result is slightly better airflow when compared to the Forefront 2, for example.

There is a small amount of space between the outer shell and the...
There is a small amount of space between the outer shell and the WaveCel and there are air channels between the vents to promote additional airflow.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The Blaze has a total of 13 vents that do a pretty good job of catching air as you roll down the trail. There are also some air channels in between the EPS foam shell and the WaveCel layer that help to draw air from front to back. The gaps in the WaveCel structure do allow a reasonable level of air to pass through, although it absolutely inhibits airflow compared to helmets with open vent holes. Its ventilation isn't terrible, but it can't even come close to the supreme ventilation of the best models in the test.

Two pads are included and they are roughly the same except for the...
Two pads are included and they are roughly the same except for the "no sweat" silicone bead across the brow on one of them.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Features


Bontrager packed the Blaze helmet full of mostly useful features. First and foremost is the namesake WaveCel technology. Again, we didn't test this to find out how well this works compared to other rotational impact protection systems, but we like the concept. As mentioned above, the Blaze comes with two sets of pads, and the no sweat pad actually does work to help manage sweat. The Boa brand fit adjustment is a nice touch and really helps to secure the helmet for a comfortable fit. We did find, however, that plastic arms of the fit adjustment system that attach by the temples conflicted somewhat with our sunglass arms.

The Fidlock magnetic buckle is secure and can be used one-handed if...
The Fidlock magnetic buckle is secure and can be used one-handed if necessary.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Bontrager has chosen to employ magnets in a couple of ways on the Blaze helmet. First, they have a Fidlock magnetic buckle to secure the chinstrap. The Fidlock system has been around for a few years now and can be found on a number of other helmets. This buckle has proven to be secure, and it can be used one-handed. Bontrager also includes a magnetic accessory mount that they call the Blendr that can be used with a light or POV camera. This magnetic mount is very quickly and easily mounted or removed from its home in the top center vent of the helmet. The Blaze also has an adjustable visor that clicks into three positions and flips up high enough to accommodate goggles when not in use. The visor is an appropriate length and width and does a fine job of blocking the sun from your eyes while riding.

The magnetic camera and light mount is quick and easy to install and...
The magnetic camera and light mount is quick and easy to install and seems more secure than we expected.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Weight


Tipping the scales at 465 grams or 16.4 ounces, the Blaze isn't a lightweight helmet. It feels noticeably heavier in hand and on your head than the majority of the other helmets we've tested. This is due in large part to the use of WaveCel in the design, which appears to have added some girth to the entire helmet all the way around. Bontrager claims it adds an average of 53g to the weight of their helmets, and that seems like a reasonable estimate to us.

At 465 grams, the Blaze is among the heaviest helmets we've tested.
At 465 grams, the Blaze is among the heaviest helmets we've tested.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Most people who are more concerned with safety than weight will probably be fine with the added weight of the WaveCel in the Blaze. Those concerned with every gram might scoff at a bike helmet that weighs this much and will be better off looking into other options.

Durability


Throughout our testing, the Blaze helmet has given us no reason to question its durability. The outer shell is well connected to the EPS foam and the WaveCel layer appears to securely connected inside of that. The straps, Boa fit adjustment, padding, and visor are in good condition and function as they should. Bontrager also includes a one-year crash replacement guarantee and will replace your Blaze free of charge should you impact it in a crash within the first year of ownership.

We can't really complain about the durability of the Blaze, plus it...
We can't really complain about the durability of the Blaze, plus it comes with a one-year crash replacement guarantee.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Value


The Blaze is undoubtedly an expensive piece of protective equipment. It is the most expensive half-shell helmet we've ever tested by a fair margin, but if you believe all of the claims being made about the WaveCel technology then perhaps it is worth the price to you. When the price of this helmet comes down or they make a less expensive mountain biking model we'll be more inclined to call it a good value. For now, we leave that judgment up to you.

The Blaze is a quality helmet with innovative new technology but the...
The Blaze is a quality helmet with innovative new technology but the price of admission is quite high.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Conclusion


The Bontrager Blaze is a very expensive new helmet model that comes equipped with the innovative new WaveCel impact protection technology. We feel this is a great helmet for the consumer interested in having the latest and greatest in protective features and technology and believes the claims that Bontrager makes about the effectiveness of this new system. Overall, we feel that the Blaze offers a high degree of protection and comfort, reasonable ventilation, and is packed with features that most riders will appreciate. Whether or not it's worth the asking price is a decision we'll leave up to you.

Other Versions and Accessories


Bontrager makes a variety of helmets for all types of riding including 3 other WaveCel equipped models. They make 2 models for road cycling, the XXX ($300) and the Specter ($150), as well as a Commuter model called the Charge ($150).

Jeremy Benson

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