The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Lezyne V10 Review

The Lezyne V10 is a small and lightweight multi-tool with just the essentials for trail side fixes.
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Price:  $36 List | $35.99 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Small, lightest in test, has the essentials
Cons:  Minimalist, ergonomics
Manufacturer:   Lezyne
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 8, 2018
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 7
  • Ergonomics - 25% 7
  • Features - 25% 6
  • Ease of Use - 20% 8
  • Portability - 20% 9
  • Durability - 10% 8

The Skinny

The V10 is a compact and lightweight multi-tool from Lezyne. It has the least functions of all models in this review, but its ten tools are typically all you need to handle simple fixes and adjustments. It comes with all the standard stuff. At 101g, it is the lightest and also one of the smallest models we tested; you'll barely even notice that you're carrying it. It has a durable all metal construction with anti-corrosion bits to ensure that it lasts for years. Ergonomics aren't fantastic but reasonable considering its small size. It also comes with a slick cover to keep it folded up neatly and prevent it from hanging up on other items in your pack. We wouldn't hesitate to stash the V10 in our pack, saddle bag, or jersey pocket.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The V10 is one of several models in Lezyne's range of V multi-tools. It falls squarely in the middle for functions with a total of 10 useful tools. While it may have the least functions of all models in this review, it covers most of your adjustment and simple fix needs while out in the field. Gram counters take note, as it is also one of the smallest and lightest weight models in this test at 101g without the cover. It also has a durable all metal construction and is offered at a reasonable price.

Performance Comparison


The V10 is the smallest and lightest model in the test  plus it still has the tools you need.
The V10 is the smallest and lightest model in the test, plus it still has the tools you need.

Features


With a total of 10 tools, the V10 has the least functions of any model in this test. That said, the 10 tools it does have cover most of your bases for simple adjustments and minor fixes out on the trail, road, or wherever you're riding. It comes equipped with hex keys in sizes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8, Torx 25 and Torx 30, a Phillips head, and a small but quality chain breaker.

All of the bits on the V10 are forged Chrome Vanadium for corrosion resistance, with machined aluminum side plates, and a stainless steel chain breaker. The tool also comes with a neoprene/faux leather sleeve that wraps around it and keeps all the tools in place while it is not in use. The neoprene sleeve adds a few grams to the overall weight of the tool, but it's a nice addition as the tools don't all sit perfectly flat.

It may only have 10 tools  but it probably has just about everything you need.
It may only have 10 tools, but it probably has just about everything you need.

Every other tool in this review has more functions than the V10. Both the Specialized EMT Pro MTB and the Park Tool IB-3 have 13, while the most fully featured model is the ToPeak Mini Pro 20 with 23. That said, if all you ever use your multi-tool for is tightening and loosening bolts and occasionally breaking a chain, then the V10 has you covered.

Ergonomics


The ergonomics of the V10 are one place where this tool is outperformed by much of the competition. This is a result of the impressively small size of the tool. It is, in fact, the smallest tool we tested at 2.5" long, 1.75" wide, and 0.5" thick. The short length makes it a little tough to get a very firm grasp on the tool as it is shorter than the width of your palm. The machined aluminum side plates have squared off edges and aren't quite as comfortable in hand than models with more rounded and contoured edges like the Specialized EMT Pro MTB or the Crankbrothers M19.

It's shorter and wider  making it a little more difficult to hold or apply lots of force.
It's shorter and wider, making it a little more difficult to hold or apply lots of force.

The tools are generally a good length, although the width of the tool makes it a little tough to turn in some of the tighter places. The chain breaker is small, which it needs to be on a tool of this size, and the result is that it's a little more challenging to get a firm grasp on when you're trying to push out a pin. It's more ergonomically friendly than the chain breaker on the OneUp EDC, but less so than those found on the Crankbrothers M19 and the Blackburn Tradesman.

Portability


The V10 is both the lightest and the smallest multi-tool in this review. Without the neoprene sleeve, it weighs only 101g. The neoprene sleeve adds 5g to its overall weight, and testers found that they preferred using the sleeve to keep the tool tight in your pack or jersey pocket. The Specialized EMT Pro MTB is the closest model in terms of weight, tipping the scales at 106g, and the OneUp EDC just behind at 108g. For comparison, the heaviest models in our test like the Blackburn Tradesman, Crankbrothers M19, and the Park Tool IB-3 weigh roughly 70g more.

The lightest model in the test.
The smallest in the test. The cover adds 5g.

At 2.5" long, 1.75" wide, and 0.5" thick, the V10 is the most compact model in this review. It's so small that it takes up almost no room in your pack. The next smallest tool is the Specialized EMT Pro MTB which is slightly longer but a touch narrower than the V10. All of the tools in this review are small and light enough to be easily portable, but if having the lightest and smallest tool is your priority then the V10 is one of the best. The OneUp EDC takes the cake for portability though, as it is conveniently stored inside of your fork's steerer tube.

Ease of Use


The V10 is relatively simple and user-friendly tool. Should you choose to use the included neoprene cover, it adds the step of removing and replacing the cover everytime you use the tool. This isn't really a big deal, it just a few seconds each time you use it and you need to keep track of it so you don't lose it. The tools themselves are very easy to locate and they rotate out of the body of the tool with moderate force for use.

Overall  the V10 is very easy to use. The chain tool is on the small side and a little harder to grasp than some of the others.
Overall, the V10 is very easy to use. The chain tool is on the small side and a little harder to grasp than some of the others.

As mentioned in the ergonomics section above, the chain breaker on the V10 is straightforward and easy to use, although its smaller size does make it a little harder to hold onto when you're really applying some torque to push a pin out of the chain. This is similar to using the chain breaker on the Specialized EMT Pro MTB which is roughly the same size as the one on the V10. Overall, testers found the V10 to be more user-friendly than tools with multiple pieces like the Park Tool IB-3 and the OneUp EDC, but a little less than tools with no cover or case like the Specialized EMT Pro MTB of the Blackburn Tradesman.

Durability


The V10 appears to be a very durable product. It is made with an all metal construction that includes machined aluminum side plates, forged and machined Cr-V+ anti-corrosion bits, a stainless steel chain breaker, and Chrome Vanadium steel hardware. The anti-corrosion bits should never rust or tarnish and the heads all look like new even after repeated use.

The neoprene sleeve cover is by far the least durable aspect of the V10. It seems likely that it will wear out over time, especially along the stitched seam on its backside. The good news is that even if the cover eventually falls apart it isn't a necessary element of the tool, though it is nice to use.

Best Applications


The V10 is great for the rider looking for just the essentials is a lightweight and compact package at a reasonable price. This tiny multi-tool is incredibly portable and great for all types of cycling, from mountain, gravel, to road riding. It's also so small and lightweight that you probably won't even notice it in your pack, saddlebag, or jersey pocket until you need to use it.

Value


At a retail price of $36, the V10 falls right around the median price for tools in this review. Considering the small size and low weight, we feel this is a good value for the cyclist looking for a compact minimalist multi-tool.

The V10 is a lightweight  very small  and quality tool from Lezyne. If weight and size matter  this is a good option to consider.
The V10 is a lightweight, very small, and quality tool from Lezyne. If weight and size matter, this is a good option to consider.

Conclusion


The V10is the lightest and most compact of all the multi-tool models in this review. It has a total of 10 useful tools and is made with a durable all metal construction and anti-corrosion bits to last you for years of trouble-free use. Testers found the small size and shape of the tool to make it a little less ergonomically friendly than some of the competition, but it gets the job done regardless. If you're looking for a light, small, and minimalist multi-tool, we think the V10 is a good option to consider.

Other Versions and Accessories


Lezyne makes a full line of multi-tools and toolkits. In their V-series alone there are five different models equipped with a varying number of tools.
The V-5 ($18) is the most basic, with five total tools which include 3, 4, 5, and 6 Allen keys and a Phillips head screwdriver, weighing in at just 50g.
The V-7 ($20) has seven tools, 2.5, 4, 5, and 6 Allen keys, T25 and T30, and a flat-head screwdriver, and weighs just 65g.
The V-11 ($37) is the same size as the V-10(tested) and has the same tools except they add a 2.5mm Allen, and swap the Phillips head screwdriver for a flat head. It weighs 102g.

The V-16 ($40) is the most fully featured, with 16 tools including all of those on the V-11 plus three sizes of spoke wrenches, a tire lever, an open-end 10mm, and storage for a quick link.


Jeremy Benson