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Backcountry Access Float 22 Review

Backcountry Access Float 22
Top Pick Award
Price:   $500 List | $434.95 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Lightweight, least expensive airbag pack, excellent backcountry friendly features, versatile, moves fantastically with the user on the down.
Cons:  Only comes in one frame size, Over-all volume is (barely) big enough for most, but not all day trips, snow safety gear pocket on the small side
Bottom line:  A killer airbag for the price that's one of our favorite pack designs; it can double for occasional day tours, making it tough to beat.
Editors' Rating:     
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Manufacturer:   BCA

Our Verdict

The new Backcountry Access Float 22 is our OutdoorGearLab Top pick winner, as it's the best airbag pack for downhill oriented backcountry adventures like side-country, heli, or cat skiing and snowboarding. The Float 22 is also a fantastic pack for sledders (folks who ride snowmobiles) because it is roomy enough for all your safety gear and a couple extra layers, without feeling cumbersome. The Float 22 is an essentially a smaller version of our Best Buy the Backcountry Access Float 32. Both Floats have the same basic pack design and layout, which overall is one of our review team's favorites among all the airbags we tested. There are a few improvements from the older Float 22 to the current one, most notable is this pack's larger, more functional and user-friendly snow safety gear pocket and improved ice axe carrying system.

The Float 22 excels at mechanized (heli, side-country, etc.) skiing and snowboarding but still functions well for day touring - as long as not too much technical gear is needed (AKA: rope, harness etc), whereas the Float 32 is primarily an all day touring, ski mountaineering, and light hut-to-hut pack. The Float 22 is one of the lighter airbag packs on the market and is one of the best-priced airbags in our review. At $500 for the pack and $175 for the canister ($675 total) it's $50 less than the Float 32, $200 less than the next closest priced airbag pack, and half the price of our OutdoorGearLab Editors' Choice, the Arc'teryx Voltair 30 or the Black Diamond Halo 28. The BCA packs don't have as fancy, unique, or as modular of an airbag systems, but they remain extremely functional, dependable, and are among the least expensive.

New Colors for 2017
The Float 22 has a new color option now. Read on below to find out more.


RELATED REVIEW: The Best Avalanche Airbag Pack Review

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Score Product Price Our Take
90
$1,300
Editors' Choice Award
If we could only own one airbag pack for everything from day tours to hut-to-hut skiing, this would be it.
86
$1,100
Top Pick Award
One of the best airbag systems that sports a solid design that is good for most day trips - as long as you don't need extra gear for colder temps or technical descents.
86
$780
A top-notch pack design ready for any day trip; it can pull double duty for shorter or supported overnight adventures.
85
$1,150
Easily our favorite airbag pack for multi-day trips or anytime we need to stuff a lot in our pack.
84
$550
Best Buy Award
One of our favorite overall pack designs coupled with BCA's basic but extremely functional and reliable airbag pack; all at a respectable weight and a good price.
83
$500
Top Pick Award
A killer airbag for the price that's one of our favorite pack designs; it can double for occasional day tours, making it tough to beat.
82
$580
Top Pick Award
If you have been considering an airbag pack but don't love how much weight they add to your touring kit, this pack is probably for you.
82
$600
Top Pick Award
If you have a slightly shorter than average torso, narrow shoulders, or are under 5'4", this lighter than average pack will not only fit you well, but you'll be pleased with its well thought out design.
82
$600
A solid, no-frills design that brings exceptional backcountry utility and below average weight; it's complete with a modular airbag system.
81
$750
A well-designed larger volume airbag pack that excels for patrollers, guides, or other extended missions - it just doesn't fit the majority of short users.
80
$1,050
A top-notch pack for its performance on the down, and solid airbag system that works well for side-country or heli/cat use.

Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Ian Nicholson
Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Saturday
April 8, 2017

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Updated Colors for 2017


The Float 22 is now available in lime (which we reviewed) as well as black. We are waiting for confirmation from BCA that these are the only updates to this airbag pack this season. See both the lime and black versions shown below.

Backcountry Access Float 22
BCA Float 22
 

The Backcountry Access Float 22 is a good all-around airbag pack that excels at downhill oriented backcountry adventures like side-country  heli  and cat skiing. It's big enough to use for all-day tours as long as you pack on the lighter side.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 is a good all-around airbag pack that excels at downhill oriented backcountry adventures like side-country, heli, and cat skiing. It's big enough to use for all-day tours as long as you pack on the lighter side.

Performance Comparison


The Float 22 (displayed in blue) performed exceptionally well across the board, as seen in the overall performance chart below.


The Backcountry Access Float 22 wins our Top Pick for the best overall airbag pack for side-country  heli  and cat skiing. The airbag system  while basic  is effective and reliable and is half the price of several other models. Here Susie Glass enjoys her BCA Float 22 while descending Moonlight Bowl near Stevens Pass  WA.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 wins our Top Pick for the best overall airbag pack for side-country, heli, and cat skiing. The airbag system, while basic, is effective and reliable and is half the price of several other models. Here Susie Glass enjoys her BCA Float 22 while descending Moonlight Bowl near Stevens Pass, WA.

Airbag System


This pack, like its bigger cousin the Float 32, uses compressed air to inflate a single 150L bag. The BCA airbag deploys from the top of the pack above your head to increase the odds that you will be on top of the debris when the avalanche comes to a stop. The location of the airbag also increases the odds of the wearer coming to a stop in a heads up position, decreasing the rescue time required to get to your airway.


The airbag itself used in BCA systems is one of the more basic, offering what is becoming the standard shape. It doesn't offer anything special or unique, but it is reliable and performs its most important task of keeping the wearer on the surface. The BCA system, like Mammut and Snowpulse systems, use compressed air. On the Float packs, the airbag system is removable and therefore interchangeable, but at this point, there is only one model of Float pack that is sold without the airbag system (and that's the Float 8).

The Backcountry Access Float 22 uses compressed air  which is fairly inexpensive and easy to refill. While not quite as easy to travel with or refill as Black Diamond's JetForce models  we rarely found it to be a hassle  especially compared to ABS models.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 uses compressed air, which is fairly inexpensive and easy to refill. While not quite as easy to travel with or refill as Black Diamond's JetForce models, we rarely found it to be a hassle, especially compared to ABS models.

Refilling Options
Backcountry Access uses compressed air canisters in all three of their Float packs. Compressed air has slightly lower performance compared with compressed nitrogen (and it's only a minimal difference) but it is significantly easier and less expensive to refill. BCA's cartridges use a pretty standard fitting that can be refilled at most scuba, paintball, and some outdoor gear stores for around $5-$20. If you have any tools or setup that uses compressed air, BCA sells an adapter you can purchase to refill your cartridges. It is possible to refill BCA canisters by hand if you are traveling to super remote regions by using a Benjamin high-pressure Pump which is capable of refilling the cylinder to the prerequisite 2700 PSI.

The new Float 22  unlike the older version  allows the trigger to be worn inside either shoulder strap. The other side of the shoulder strap is hydration tube compatible.
The new Float 22, unlike the older version, allows the trigger to be worn inside either shoulder strap. The other side of the shoulder strap is hydration tube compatible.

Trigger Mechanism
The new Float 22, unlike the older version, allows the trigger to be worn inside either shoulder strap. The Float 22 also features four horizontal webbing loops inside the shoulder strap compartment to allow the wearer to customize the height of the trigger, further making it easier to grab. The BCA trigger mechanism is a basic, but reliable system with its only nuance being that you need to spend thirty seconds to one minute double checking the internally threaded connection (where the trigger attaches to the canister) to make sure it hasn't come unthreaded - which it can over long periods of time. We don't think this is a big deal, as you should be doing something similar with all airbag packs.

Travel Considerations
When flying domestically in the United States, you can fly with an empty compressed air canister as long as it's in your checked baggage. Internationally, it is currently okay to fly with a full cartridge and we have done this a half dozen times on flights to Europe to verify that it actually works. Regardless, a good tip is to keep the box that your canister came in so when you fly, simply put it back in its original box to define what your canister is to help make sure TSA doesn't take it. We recommend going one extra step when flying domestically and put a note on it, saying it's empty and that it's for an avalanche airbag pack.

The Backcountry Access Float 22 offers pretty good backcountry utility for its volume. It excels for short tours and side-country use  but if you don't need too much stuff it can easily work for all-day tours. Here tester Ian Nicholson pulls everything he needs for a full profile while out on an observation day for the Northwest Avalanche Center on Big Chief Mountain.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 offers pretty good backcountry utility for its volume. It excels for short tours and side-country use, but if you don't need too much stuff it can easily work for all-day tours. Here tester Ian Nicholson pulls everything he needs for a full profile while out on an observation day for the Northwest Avalanche Center on Big Chief Mountain.

Backcountry Utility
Our testers love the overall layout of this airbag and BCA upgraded our testers' biggest gripe with the old version when designing the new Float 22. It now features a longer and larger snow safety gear pocket that accommodates most average sized probes, saws, and shovels.

The new Float 22 now features a longer and much more user-friendly snow safety gear pocket that accommodates most average-sized probes  saws  and shovels.
The new Float 22 now features a longer and much more user-friendly snow safety gear pocket that accommodates most average-sized probes, saws, and shovels.

Other high scorers in our fleet for the backcountry utility metric include the Arc'teryx Voltair 30, Backcountry Access Float 32, and Backcountry Access Float 42; each of these contenders scored a perfect 10 out of 10.


Carrying Skis/Snowboard
This pack isn't really designed to carry skis A-frame style, but it has a super easy to use diagonal carry system that was one of our favorites in our review. BCA's system was quick and easy to set up and the skis slopped around less than on other packs we tested, such as the Mammut Ride 3.0. For $35 you can buy a snowboard carrier that carries the snowboard horizontally behind your back. We thought this was less ideal for snowboard mountaineering, but it works great while riding a snowmobile.

The helmet holster on the Backcountry Access Float 22 is very user-friendly and secure. Unlike the older version of the Float 22  it's permanently attached  making it nearly impossible to lose.
The helmet holster on the Backcountry Access Float 22 is very user-friendly and secure. Unlike the older version of the Float 22, it's permanently attached, making it nearly impossible to lose.

Features


This contender also features a mesh, permanently attached helmet carrier that can function in the middle of the pack, or can be offset to one side to keep your helmet out of the way while carrying skis diagonally.


The Float 22 features a single, large zippered hip belt pocket that is great for ski straps, a couple (yes a couple) Snickers bars, an Inclinometer, or a traditional point and shoot camera. We loved being able to keep a camera in the pocket for quick shots. The Float 22 also features an internal mesh pocket for smaller, easily lost items.

Our testers loved the Backcountry Access Float 22's zippered waist belt pocket that was perfect for snacks  a camera  or lip balm.
Our testers loved the Backcountry Access Float 22's zippered waist belt pocket that was perfect for snacks, a camera, or lip balm.

Comfort


The Float 22 runs slightly shorter than the Float 32. The Float 22 is comfortable and carries well while skiing and skinning. The only downside is it only comes in one size, limiting the number of people it might fit. The shoulder straps are well articulated but they fit more broad shouldered folks better.


We liked the foam they used in the shoulder straps of the Float 22. This pack will work best for folks who are around 5'8"- 6'4" and is not the best option for shorter folks. Look at the smaller sized Mammut Ride Short if you have narrow shoulders and/or you're on the shorter side of the spectrum.

The Backcountry Access Float 22 fits smaller-framed users pretty well compared to most airbag packs available  though its volume is a little on the small side for a regular all-day touring pack. Here  Susie Glass makes it work while enjoying a well-timed corn skiing lap on the Paradise Glacier.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 fits smaller-framed users pretty well compared to most airbag packs available, though its volume is a little on the small side for a regular all-day touring pack. Here, Susie Glass makes it work while enjoying a well-timed corn skiing lap on the Paradise Glacier.

Downhill Performance


This scoring metric measures how well each pack moved with us and handled while skiing and snowboarding on the descent. The Float 22 scored well above average in this category and among the very best packs in our review overall, earning a 9 out of 10.


It performed similarly to the Black Diamond Pilot 11 JetForce, but better than most larger volume packs. It won our top pick award for the best airbag pack for side-country and heli-skiing because it performed equally well to the BD Pilot 11 JetForce on the descent, but the Float 22's slightly larger volume was nice for side-country days that might involve some skinning ( it was just big enough to tour with - barely). Other top performers in this category include the Mammut Light Removable, the Arc'teryx Voltair 30, and the Black Diamond Halo 28.

The Backcountry Access Float 22 was one of the very best packs as far as how it felt and moved with its user on the descent or while riding a snowmobile. The only other pack that scored as well as the Float 22 in our Downhill Performance category was the Black Diamond Pilot 11 JetForce. While that pack was great to ride with  the size  weight  and versatility of the Float 22 was what pushed it over-the-top to win this award. Here Susie Glass enjoys the Float 22's downhill performance while descending the north slope of Jim Hill.
The Backcountry Access Float 22 was one of the very best packs as far as how it felt and moved with its user on the descent or while riding a snowmobile. The only other pack that scored as well as the Float 22 in our Downhill Performance category was the Black Diamond Pilot 11 JetForce. While that pack was great to ride with, the size, weight, and versatility of the Float 22 was what pushed it over-the-top to win this award. Here Susie Glass enjoys the Float 22's downhill performance while descending the north slope of Jim Hill.

Weight


This is one of the lighter airbag packs on the market weighing in at 6 pounds 8 ounces; that's just over a pound heavier than the Mammut Light Removable which was the lightest pack in our review. However, do note that the Float 22 is a pound to half a pound lighter than most other airbag packs we tested. In fact, it's over a pound lighter than our OutdoorGearLab Editors' Choice, the Arc'teryx Voltair 30, and our Top Pick, the Black Diamond Halo 28.


Overall Cost Breakdown


The cost of airbag packs can be confusing, as some prices might include the cost of the canister, while others do not. Some companies sell options without the airbag system or base unit, so make sure you know what you are buying. With the Backcountry Access Float 22, the pack itself is $500, and the compressed air cartridge is $175, bringing the grand total to $675.

The Float 22 is one of the least expensive airbag packs on the market; at $500 for the pack and airbag and another $175 for the canister  your $675 out-the-door price is one of the straight up cheapest ways to get into an airbag pack.
The Float 22 is one of the least expensive airbag packs on the market; at $500 for the pack and airbag and another $175 for the canister, your $675 out-the-door price is one of the straight up cheapest ways to get into an airbag pack.

Value


This is one of the best-priced avalanche airbag packs on the market. At $675, it's $50 less than the Backcountry Access Float 32 and $150 less than the next closest priced packs, the Mammut Ride Removable and Mammut Ride Short, which are both $775 ($600 for the pack and $175 for the canister). This pack is almost half the price (including the canister) of the Black Diamond Halo 28 ($1150) and almost less than half of the Arc'teryx Voltair 30 ($1300).

The Backcountry Access Float 22 has a lot of good applications but is best for side-country or shorter tours  where its downhill performance will be most appreciated and its small volume won't be a determinant. Ian Nicholson prepares to drop into the classic Stevens Pass side-country run "Highland Bowl".
The Backcountry Access Float 22 has a lot of good applications but is best for side-country or shorter tours, where its downhill performance will be most appreciated and its small volume won't be a determinant. Ian Nicholson prepares to drop into the classic Stevens Pass side-country run "Highland Bowl".

Best Application


The Float 22 is a little bit of a "do it all" size. We think the Float 22 is big enough for someone to go backcountry touring all day as long - as they pack light. It's the perfect size for heli, cat, or side-country skiing, but wasn't big enough most of the time for more technical objectives when a rope, harness, and other gear was required (or when temperatures are low). If you like the design of the Float 22 but wish it was a little bigger, check out the Backcountry Access Float 32; it's 10 liters bigger, has an adjustable torso length and better ice axe holders, and can carry skis A-frame style for lower elevation approaches.

Despite its small volume and excellent price  the Backcountry Access Float 22 doesn't cut many corners when it comes to design. Our review team loved the features on this pack and found it to be one of the best designs overall.
Despite its small volume and excellent price, the Backcountry Access Float 22 doesn't cut many corners when it comes to design. Our review team loved the features on this pack and found it to be one of the best designs overall.

The exception for when the Black Diamond Pilot 11 JetForce is better is when folks go heli or cat skiing in remote areas. Most heli and cat operations are set up to deal with refilling compressed air canisters that both BCA and Mammut use. However, not all heli and cat skiing operations are capable of this and for the ones that aren't, the Pilot 11 is better because you can have access to a plug.

BCA Float 22s and Float 32s are everywhere! Ryan O'Connell gets ready to drop into the 50-degree entrance of the Gun Barrels while testing airbag packs in Valdez  AK.
BCA Float 22s and Float 32s are everywhere! Ryan O'Connell gets ready to drop into the 50-degree entrance of the Gun Barrels while testing airbag packs in Valdez, AK.

Bottom Line


The BCA Float 22 is our new OutdoorGearLab Top Pick for the best airbag pack for side-country or other descent-oriented backcountry uses. It won this award because it moves with its wearer exceptionally well, and is a rad, well-designed pack, that fits most folks well - all at an awesome price. It's big enough for most single day touring as long as you don't need a lot of extra stuff. It's still small enough that it won't be obnoxious while riding chairs between side-country runs. It's on the lighter side of airbag packs and its compressed air canister is easy and inexpensive to refill. We'd get the Black Diamond Pilot 11 if the price isn't an issue, you knew you never wanted to tour with it, and the ease of refilling was one of the more important factors for you.
Ian Nicholson

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Most recent review: April 8, 2017
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