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ZPacks 20 Degree Review

   
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Ultralight Sleeping Bags

  • Currently 4.5/5
Overall avg rating 4.5 of 5 based on 8 reviews. Most recent review: October 8, 2014
Street Price:   $345
Pros:  Highest warmth-to-weight ratio of any bag tested, custom options include zipper, fill, and draft tube, and hydrophobic down, waterproof dry bag stuff sack.
Cons:  Not as versatile as a quilt (doesn't adapt to clothing/body type), zipper can come undone.
Best Uses:  Ultralight three-season use.
User Rating:     
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 (4.3 of 5) based on 7 reviews
Recommendations:  100% of reviewers (7/7) recommend this product
Manufacturer:   ZPacks
Review by: Chris McNamara ⋅ Founder and Editor-in-Chief, OutdoorGearLab ⋅ March 31, 2013  
Overview
The ZPacks 20 Degree bag offers the absolute highest warmth-to-weight ratio of any sleeping bag we've ever tested. However, ordering it is not very convenient, since it is not available from major retailers, and only directly from the small manufacturer in Florida (custom-made, involving long delays in delivery). But, if you can get past the idea of ordering a custom-made bag, you won't be disappointed. Our top bag available from retailers and top ultralight option with a hood is the Western Mountaineering Highlite.

ZPacks takes what most retailers would call a "superlight" bag and chops the unnecessary bits. Off goes the hood, the draft tube, and on goes a small and light zipper. The bag weighs a mere 17.1 ounces on our scale, performs admirably below freezing, and includes the best stuff sack we've ever seen included with a sleeping bag. ZPacks sleeping bags push the fast and light performance envelope to the next level.

The only significant drawback to this bag is its fixed girth. Quilts have the advantage of being able to adjust to the amount of clothing you're wearing or to various body types. The ZPacks 20 Degree bag performs at the highest level in three-season conditions but doesn't provide the versatility of a quilt; all but the skinniest people it won't be able to accommodate a down jacket in the winter.

The Katabatic Gear Palisade is our highest rated backpacking sleeping bag and our top choice for one lightweight bag that can be used in both summer and winter temperatures. If you prefer a hood, consider the Feathered Friends Penguin but be prepared to carry an additional seven ounces and pay the extra cost of a more complex bag. Those on a budget can't beat the $100 Kelty Cosmic Down 20.

Also see our General Purpose Sleeping Bag Review and Winter Sleeping Bag Review.

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OutdoorGearLab Editors' Hands-on Review

Introduction
After testing over 40 three-season sleeping bags we believe ZPacks line of sleeping bags available in 10, 20, 30, and 40-degree models offers the greatest warmth-to-weight ratio for three-season applications. The company's 20 Degree bag is our top choice for fast and light missions where we won't wear a midweight or heavier jacket inside the bag.

Click to enlarge
ZPacks 20 Degree sleeping bag.
Credit: ZPacks
Features and Fit
This bag is about as simple as it gets. There's no hood no draft tube (to insulate the zipper) and it's cut trim to fit athletic people. The bag is available in two widths and three sizes, which allows you to get the best fit for your body type and specific end use. The bag has a small toe box that's comfortable for backpacking; unlike expedition winter bags, this does not have room for extra clothes and abundant electronics.

ZPacks offers a handful of custom options for this bag. The standard zipper length is 3/4 and is designed for you to sleep on top of the zipper in cold conditions (thereby eliminating the need for a draft tube). If you aren't comfortable keeping the zipper underneath, you can add a draft tube (0.8oz) for $20. Ultralight webbing straps, much like those found on quilts we've tested, can replace a zipper. Or you can drop the zipper entirely and sew the bag up, similar to the Feathered Friends Vireo, a winter climbing bag.

Click to enlarge
The ZPacks 20 Degree bag closes around your neck with an elasticized drawcord (notice the black cord on top) and has a 3/4 length zipper that you sleep on top of during cold conditions.
Credit: Outdoor Gear Lab
Warmth
We took the ZPacks 20 Degree bag head-to-head with our top-rated hooded bags from the world's best down companies. This bag is significantly warmer for its weight than any other three-season hooded bag we've tested. It's designed for long distance backpacking, which remains it's best application, but our trimmer testers were able to squeeze a midweight down jacket inside, which expands the bag's application to fast and light alpine climbing. With light layering the bag kept our testers warm into the low teens.

It's Missing a Hood?!
Yes, and this a good thing. Hood-less sleeping bags have three significant advantages over their hooded counterparts: (1) They're more comfortable. Only a handful of the 70 sleeping bags we've tested have hoods that are truly comfortable when fully cinched. Separating the hood from the bag allows you to turn over without getting lost inside the hood and without spewing moisture vapor into the bag (which adds weight and reduces loft). Our testers unanimously agree that hood-less bags are more comfortable than bags with hoods. (2) Hood-less bags are lighter! Most people do the majority of their backpacking in above freezing conditions when hoods are rarely needed. Why carry it if you don't need it? (3) Hood-less bags cost less to manufacture. As described below, we rarely carry a dedicated down hood. Why pay the additional cost of a hood if you don't need one?

Our testers, who generally hike with a hooded baselayer, lightweight hooded fleece, or hooded jacket, rarely perhaps on one trip out of ten bring a dedicated down hood. We believe hoods are best if you're using the bag at or below its temperature limit and find a hat/jacket hood/balaclava to be heavier or less warm than a down hood. We've tested down hoods from four different companies, including the Katabatic Gear Windom Hood, and have found the ZPacks Goose Hood to be the most comfortable. Note that down hoods are not suitable for wearing while hiking in wet conditions.

Click to enlarge
The Mountain Hardwear Speed 32 weighs 16.3 oz (left) and the ZPacks 20 Degree bag weighs 17.1 oz. Notice the dramatic difference in loft! Eliminating a hood and draft tube allows ZPacks to be very warm for minimal weight.
Credit: Outdoor Gear Lab
Weight and Packed Size
This bag is the most compact three-season bag we've ever tested. It packs down as small or smaller than hooded 40-degree bags.

Click to enlarge
The ZPacks 20 Degree sleeping bag is the most compressible sleeping bag we've tested. So much warmth in such a tiny package. The sleeping bag comes with an excellent lightweight cuben fiber dry bag style stuff sack.
Credit: Outdoor Gear Lab
Comfort
The ZPacks 20 Degree is very comfortable for a superlight backpacking bag. Don't expect to sprawl about like you would in a gigantic rectangular car camping bag. The main thing we find that reduces comfort is a restrictive hood that pinches or irritates your face when fully cinched. This bag skips the hood problem and its elasticized neck drawcord is comfortable; not as luxurious as the overstuffed collar on Katabatic Gear Quilts, but comfortable nonetheless.

Click to enlarge
Successive exhausting days make you sleep colder than normal. Here Matt Wilhelm settles into the ZPacks 20 Degree bag and Mountain Laurel Designs Superlight Bivy at 13,200 ft on the Evolution Traverse, California.
Credit: Outdoor Gear Lab
Versatility
Fixed girths sleeping bags suffer from limited versatility. They can't adapt to additional clothing layers like winter down jackets. This bag is intended for three-season use. Consider a quilt if you want one bag for three-season conditions and for winter when used with down clothing.

Limitations
This bag has no significant drawbacks. The model we tested did not have a closure around the zipper but ZPacks has since added a small velcro tab to relieve stress from the zipper and prevent the bag from opening at night. Based on the photo below this looks more secure than most velcro closure found on bags we've tested, but may not be as secure, as durable, or as comfortable (velcro can irritate your skin if not closed or positioned properly) as a snap. We believe the best closure system is found on the Feathered Friends "Light Flight" series. Those bags use a single snap closure. This is a very minor nit-picky point.

Another one: most of the sleeping bags we've tested use thin static cord for the hood and neck closure. This bag uses a thin elastic, which is more comfortable than static cord but may not be as durable in the long-term. This is a very minor potential drawback; if the cord fails you can easily re-thread it with a cord or elastic of your own.

Click to enlarge
Velcro zippper closure. The model we tested did not have this feature and the zipper occasionally came undone at night. Although this closure looks secure, snap closures are generally easier, more durable, and slightly more comfortable against bare skin.
Credit: ZPacks
Hydrophobic Down?
ZPacks offers their sleeping bags in an 800-fill hydrophobic down option. Based on preliminary field testing OutdoorGearLab does does not believe treated down is a viable alternative to synthetic insulation and is concerned about the long-term durability of treated down when compared to untreated down. If treated down does prove to be durable in the long-term then it presents a gigantic leap forward for the outdoor industry. At this time, however, we are hesitant to recommend treated down. See more about hydrophobic down and our plans for testing it here.

Bonus Point
We gave this bag a bonus point in its Feature score for the awesome cuben fiber dry bag stuff sack that comes with the bag. This is the best stuff sack that we've ever seen included with a sleeping bag. It's waterproof, weighs half an ounce, is durable, and is functionally airtight, i.e. if your backpack was submerged your sleeping bag should remain dry. The same sack that comes free with your bag costs $21 on ZPacks' online store.

Value
At $345 this is an excellent value. It's close to $100 less than the best hooded bag we've tested (Feathered Friends Hummingbird) and far less than $500 sleeping bags such as the Marmot Plasma and Sierra Designs Cloud. This bag offers higher performance for backpacking and costs less. And comes with an awesome stuff sack. Exceptional value for a high performance product that could last a decade or more.

How To Get It
ZPacks sleeping bags are not currently sold by major online retailers or outdoor stores. Choose your preferred warmth and weight at www.zpacks.com Read an interview transcript with ZPacks founder Joe Valesko here.

Videos

Chris McNamara and Max Neale

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OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: October 8, 2014
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
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 (5.0)
Average Customer Rating:   
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  • 5
 (4.3)

100% of 7 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
8 Total Ratings
5 star: 50%  (4)
4 star: 38%  (3)
3 star: 13%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
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   Nov 23, 2012 - 01:47pm
This was my first time using a hoodless bag and while I was skeptical at first, I totally loved the ZPacks 20 Degree. For anyone who has a tendency to find themselves up in the middle of the night with the hood of their bag covering their face, you will be particularly happy with this bag. No matter how much you roll around, and what position you sleep in, this will keep your head and face much warmer and much more comfortable than a bag with a traditional hood.

This bag was incredibly warm and comfortable, as well as lightweight and easy to stuff down. More so than the mountain hardwear bag it is compared to in this review. I'd recommend it to anyone who isn't totally disorganized and may have the tendency to lose items (such as the hood).

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
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   Aug 6, 2013 - 03:41pm
The ZPacks 20 Degree bag is a nice piece of gear. Initially I was both surprised by the lightness of the bag as well as skeptical of the materials used to make the bag. I was afraid that it just wasn't going to hold up in the field.

Fortunately, after both my son and I have tested it in the field over about a month of camping and backpacking I must say that I'm astonished with the toughness of the materials as well as the workmanship of the bag. It's really a well made sleeping bag. My son is a back sleeper and I am a stomach sleeper and we both found the bag reasonably comfortable.

The only problem that I've encountered is with the bags warmth, but then again I tend to get cold when I sleep. When it gets to about 30-35 degrees I found that I have to pull on an extra layer to sleep comfortably. My son hasn't seemed to have that problem with this bag and has slept comfortably in only a tee-shirt and shorts (down to 25-30 degrees). I'll probably order another 10 degree bag for myself and give him my 20 degree bag.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
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   Nov 24, 2012 - 06:41pm
Mateo · Climber · Tahoe, CA
I had the opportunity to test this bag out at 13,000 ft in the high sierra this last summer. Coupled with a light bivy sack it made for a remarkably cozy and ultra-light setup. I also have to emphasize that it packs down to a stupidly small size for those that need the extra room in their pack. Although the hood is a cool feature I decided to leave it behind in lieu of the fact that I had enough insulation with a hooded jacket and fleece.

This bag offers a solid approach to going light and fast without sacrificing comfort or warmth.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Oct 8, 2014 - 12:50pm
seattlenativemike · Backpacker · Seattle
My review is for the ZPacks 10 degree bag.

I picked up one of these as part of my ounce-shaving efforts before heading up into the Enchantments Lakes basin in WA. Temps were supposed to be in the 30s at night with some wind. I use a Shires Contrail tent that is nicely ventilated.

I slept in my hiking pants, pullover and Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer jacket with hood. I definitely needed the jacket and hood. Without it I felt chilled and woke often. I had the long version of the bag which allowed me to slip further into it for more warmth.

This bag is astonishingly light, very well made and I must be a cold sleeper. I sold my MH Speed 32 bag which would have been miserable at these temps.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Jul 8, 2014 - 01:46am
Carpenter · Backpacker · Pacific Grove
Click to enlarge
New zipper buckle 7-3-2014 z pack 10 degree
Credit: Carpenter
20 degree z pack quilt; Pros: 17oz. No explanation needed here. I hike up mountains, that is what I do. Every oz I can eliminate is pure joy to me. The down is over stuffed, they tell you this and the spec sheets show it has more down than the other quilts tested. This I assume is to keep the down in place longer. It is a quilt when unzipped and a bag when it is zipped. Its easy to regulate your temperature. If you hold the bag up to the sun light you can see the down and move it where you want. I had to fluff my up a bit. The two bags that I have been using so far the last 15 years or so are a 35 degree marmot 1lb 10oz and a western mountaineering 10 degree tipping the scales at over 2 lbs 6 oz. they both have useless heavy stuff sacks. Z packs light water proof dry bag of cuben fiber. Z packs 20 deg makes my marmot obsolete. and I am sad to say it is retired. I am 5'-8" 168 lbs 40" chest and the regular girth seemed fine for me. I haven't tried wearing a down jacket yet but I don't think it will be a problem fitting it in there. The neck draw string makes sense for trapping in the warmth and keeping moist breath out. the 900 dry sown is piece of mind for long periods in damp weather or just in case. I haven't bothered to compress it. I just use the dry sack it comes with. put it on the bottom of my Z pzck arc blast and let my gear flatten it into the shape of the pack as was intended I think. It feels silky smooth too. My bag arrive April 3rd 2014 and the zipper closure at the top near your face is not velcrow anymore. Mine has a nice slender 3/4 inch wide snap buckle and I like it. After checking out their web site for about a year or so and reading reviews I finally pulled the trigger on a pack and bag ordered two weeks apart and they managed to ship them all at once on time and could not be happier.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Dec 17, 2013 - 02:55am
Sorry for the long winded review, but I thought it might help someone. I borrowed my buddy's zpacks 10* bag for the night, and while I didn't spend the entire night in it, I had a chance to compare it to my WM megalite bag. I thought the comparisons might help some of you who haven't been able to handle one of these in person yet.

I did some highly scientific field testing in the back yard tonight between my friend's zpacks and my WM. This does not make me an expert on either one, but it was very helpful as I learned a few things about both of them. Granted, this testing is done at cold temps. I tried to be as objective as possible, but we all know that never really happens.

Details of the experiment:

I'm 5'6", 170 lbs.

9:30 went to sleep in the WM megalite (30* bag, 5'6" length). Temp read 30* when I started, and there was a gentle breeze. No tent. I was sleeping on my NeoAir Xtherm pad directly on the grass (which had a few tufts of snow under the pad, but it was mainly grass.) I was using a regular down pillow with my nemo fillo on top of it. I had my thermometer about 2 feet away to record temps. I was wearing my merino wool thermals and a cotton/acrylic beanie.

WM Megalite:

It took me about 10 minutes to fall asleep. I cinched the drawstring tight around my face, leaving a hole for my mouth and nose. This bag has a bit of a half-baffle on the front half of the neck. I felt air whoosh by my face every time I made big movements. The cut of this bag is definitely too big for me. I could easily fit a sack of potatoes in my bag with me and still have some wiggle room.

I woke up around 11:00 PM because I was getting cold in the megalite. I looked over at my thermometer and it was 10* (20* below the rating of this bag). I didn't realize it at the time, but the air in my pad had condensed so much that it looked about 50% inflated. I'm sure that had a lot to do with why I was chilly. This was a reminder to inflate my pad with another bag vs my breath.

I woke up because I was cold and starting to get a bit uncomfortable. I definitely could have slept through the night at that temp, but it wasn't "toasty" and I had cold spots, especially on my hip when sleeping on my side. One thing I don't like about the megalite is the way the down shifts to the sides in the night. It's easy to fluff it up and push the down back on top of me from inside the bag, but it's annoying. Marmot makes their plasma bags with vertical baffles to solve this problem, and I think it's a great idea. Now, even though I don't like the way the down falls off you a bit during the night, I do like how easy it is to push down around to cold spots to warm you up. For cold weather, I can push all the down to the top of the bag. For warm weather, I can push it all to the bottom underneath me. I just wish the down stayed in place a bit more. I'm sure I'm exaggerating the problem, but i did feel cold spots that went away when I pushed more down into them.

I could lay on my back and fold my hands on my chest and my elbows had plenty of room to still move around. My feet definitely touched the end, but they weren't crammed against it. I'm convinced i'm not compressing any down in the feet. The 5'6" is the right length for me, the bag is just too wide at the shoulders, chest, and hips.

If I had re-inflated my pad, I'm betting I would have gone right back to sleep, with a slight cold spot over my hips that would require re-positioning down throughout the night.



Zpacks 10* Long (6'1") wide:

This is obviously not an apples to apples comparison, but it's interesting either way. I traded out the WM for the zpacks bag for this test. I re-inflated my neoair, swapped out my hat to a regular hunting balaclava, and climbed in. It was 10*. I zipped the zipper up all the way, put it on the bottom so I was sleeping on it (like it's meant to do), and cinched the drawstring tightly around my neck.

Instantly I noticed some differences between the bags.

1) the cloth inside the zpacks feels almost rubbery, not like pertex quantum at all. It was almost sticky, and it grabbed your clothes a little.

EDIT: After talking to Joe, it seems he had a short run with a different inner fabric. The newer bags do not have this sticky fabric.

2) the cut of the zpacks fits my body a LOT better. I can't fit a sack of potatoes in it with me inside. I could still move around inside it, and move my arms from my thighs to my shoulders without being awkward, but there wasn't nearly as much dead space to fill. It was tight folding my hands on my chest and putting my elbows out. There was noticeably less room (a good thing for me). This surprised me since this is the "wide" version of the bag. I don't think I'd want the bag to be any narrower, or it'd be too narrow.

3) the zpacks had more loft than the WM (as it should, since it's rated for 20* colder). I could feel the thick blanket of down all around on all sides. It was much warmer than the WM, but it never felt too warm for me (I hardly ever complain about being too warm while sleeping, unless it's over 80* at night).

4) Length: surprisingly enough, the zpacks felt even shorter than the WM. I'm 5'6" and I couldn't pull the top of the bag up past my eyes/forehead. This really surprised me. I know it's rated to be cinched at your neck, but I'm 100% sure anything shorter would be too short for me. In fact, when I order mine, I'll be getting the 6'5" one.

5) the cinch around the neck was awesome. It completely eliminated any air whooshing, and sealed me from the neck down better than any bag I've ever tried. This led me to realize just how cold my head was though, even with the elmer fudd hat. If I were to use it this way, I'd need the down balaclava to keep my head warm, and even then I wonder if it'd be warm enough. The top of the bag is really wide, so it required a lot of string to close it around my neck, but it worked just like it should with no issues.

6) After 5 minutes of tossing and turning, I switched over to my side. I felt something that felt like a foxtail weed or bur in the side of my calf/knee area. I immediately felt bad for bringing a weed into my friend's bag, but I couldn't imagine how it happened. I shifted around a bit, but it didn't go away. Then I started to wonder if it was the zipper I was feeling. Up to this point, I couldn't feel the zipper at all. In fact, I wouldn't be able to tell if it were directly beneath my spine or on top of me. The zipper is indistinguishable. HOWEVER, where the zipper starts, it has a really stiff piece of zipper that was scratching my leg. This was the foxtrail bur feeling. Not cool. This was enough to cause enough discomfort to annoy me and keep me up. I shifted the bag so the end of the zipper was on the side instead of under me, and it went away. I wonder if all the bags are like this, or just this one. I think it could be fixed with some soft fleece over it, or maybe trimming it more, but it was a bummer.

7) The thread used to sew the bag is scratchier than the WM. I only noticed it in one spot. It wasn't enough to keep my up at night, but it was noticeable enough to mention.

8) The zipper started at the back of my knees.

9) Great down retention. I only 'tested' it for 20 minutes, but the down didn't shift at all during that time. Very impressive here. I wouldn't expect to find cold spots in the middle of the night

10) It's noticeably lighter than my WM, and my WM is not heavy. It's awesome that a 10* bag weighs less than an ultralight 30* bag.

11) The zpacks is handbuilt by guys who camp. Their quality is great, but not like the WM. Fit and finish details I'd give them an 8/10. The WM gets a 10/10. The zpacks isn't low quality at all, but it does feel a TINY bit more homemade than the WM's factory-made finish. I'm sure zpacks will only improve with time as his design continues to be tweaked.

My goal was to sleep in the bag for the rest of the night to get a good idea of it, but I struggled to fall asleep in this bag. It could have been the excitement of finally trying a zpacks, or maybe it's because I had already slept an hour and a half and I wasn't very tired anymore (though not likely, as I'm still pretty tired writing this review). My face was so cold that I had a hard time sleeping. This is no fault of the bag, because it isn't designed to keep your face warm. At 25* or warmer, it wouldn't be an issue at all.

I decided to experiment a bit with the bag, since I'm new to quilts and hoodless bags. I pulled the opening up to my chin and ears and it stayed in place. It was much warmer this way. I tried to pull it up all the way over my head like a traditional mummy bag, but it wasn't long enough, and it was awkwardly shaped to be used like a hood. I think an extra 5-6" would have made it go over my head, but it still would have been awkward. So I put it back to my chin and found a happy medium. The velcro tab that closes over the top of the zipper was nice. It was hard to feel in the dark which side of the tab is the loop end of the hook and loop velcro fastener, but once you do it once or twice you get the hang of it. It closed the zipper nicely and it didn't move at all.

I then experimented with some different layouts. I completely loosened the cinch cord around the neck and pulled my arms out. It fit nicely like this, tucked under my arms (like how women wear a towel stepping out of the shower). I could see this being extremely comfortable in the warmer temps. Earlier I had wondered why the neck opening was so wide, and now it made sense

I took it one step further and completely unzipped the bag. Davy told me this is how he uses it and that he's never zipped it up, even in 0* situations. It sounds stupid, but the bag instantly transformed the second I unzipped it. It unzipped all the way down to the back of my knees, and my body was resting directly on my pad. It was plenty warm this way, which surprised me (even though logically it makes sense, mentally it did not). I draped the bag over me like a blanket and just ticked it under my sides to keep drafts out. It worked beautifully, and I'm confident that if I owned one, this is how I'd use the bag 99.9% of the time. It was every bit as warm as when I had it zipped up, but I could pull it tight or leave it loose around my body. Now I know why quilts are catching on so well, they really give you a ton of options. I always worried about rolling over and untucking my quilt and introducing a draft, but it was really intuitive and that didn't happen for more than half a second. I still wasn't able to pull the bag over my head, but I felt like I would have been warmer if I had been able to. When I tried to pull it over my head, my feet were compressing the down in the foot box. The 6'5" or possibly even longer would be my preference, and I'm only 5'6". As a quilt, it was also easier to move around in, since it didn't stick to my clothing as much, since I had more room.

On a side note, the footbox of the WM seemed to be a bit warmer. I can't explain why. The zpacks wasn't cold per se, but my feet were the coldest part in the bag, which wasn't a concern in the 30* WM.

I'm still undecided on which bag is the right one for me, but I'm heavily leaning towards a zpacks. If/when I order one, it will probably have the following modifications:
  • 6'5" (or possibly 6'7") long so I can pull it entirely over my head.
  • wide version (in fact, 2-3" another wider wouldn't hurt when using it as a quilt)


I hope that helps. I tried to be fair to both bags. There's no doubt they're both fantastic bags for the price. Depending on the features and how you use them, one will most likely stand out as suiting your needs better. I can definitely see myself becoming a quilt convert after this test.

I realize this isn't an in-depth, multi week field test, but I hope it helps someone know what to expect out of the box.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   May 4, 2013 - 03:24pm
sonenthal · Hiker · Seattle, WA
Received a 20 degree bag and indeed it is a great design and very warm for its size. Packs easy and light, really a great bag. Probably one of the best I have ever seen.
However I returned this bag because it was defective.
They gave me my money back - no problem, I was simply disappointed with the lack of quality assurance.
Overall if they have inspected the bag before shipping everything would of been great and I would of kept it.

Since it is a great design and the defect was the only problem, I gave them a 3 star.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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ZPacks 20 Degree Sleeping Bag
Credit: ZPacks
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