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Black Diamond Trail Back Review

   
Best Buy Award

Trekking Poles

  • Currently 4.3/5
Overall avg rating 4.3 of 5 based on 5 reviews. Most recent review: August 4, 2014
Street Price:   Varies from $72 - $80 | Compare prices at 5 resellers
Pros:  Excellent locking mechanism, durable.
Cons:  Average weight, Just okay grips.
Best Uses:  Hiking, backpacking, climbing.
User Rating:     
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 (4.5 of 5) based on 4 reviews
Recommendations:  100% of reviewers (3/3) recommend this product
Manufacturer:   Black Diamond
Review by: Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor, OutdoorGearLab ⋅ August 4, 2014  
Overview
The Black Diamond Trail Back Trekking poles win our Best Buy award because they have many of the same features as poles that are $40 to $60 more expensive but are close to as good. For example, our Editors' Choice winner, the Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork, is lighter, has better grips, and scores a little higher but is almost double the price. If you are looking for a solid pole without having to spend a lot of money, look no further. If you are looking for a similarly performing and priced pole that has a shock mechanism, check out the REI Traverse Shocklight. If you want a rubber grip be sure to check out the $100 Leki Quantum.

We love the FlickLock locking mechanism and nice ergonomically shaped grips with quality foam. The Trail Back is a solid versatile pole that will last most people hundreds of days of enjoyment. They improved the grips this year from a basic rubber handle to a nicely shaped EVA foam handle with a nice area to chock down on. While they weren't the nicest handles we tested, they were a little above average. The Trail Backs are a few ounces heavier than many models we tested, but again they are only two-thirds the price.

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OutdoorGearLab Editors' Hands-on Review

Performance Comparison
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Dan Whitmore getting a feel for his Black Diamond Trail trekking poles and the glacier fed waters of the North Fork Bridge creek with Mt. Goode and Storm King looming above, North Cascades National Park, WA.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Comfort
The comfort category of our performance comparison includes both the grip and the straps and how nicely they felt day after day of extensive use. The Black Diamond Trail Back was slightly above average over-all and features a nicely shaped, smaller-than-average diameter foam grip with descent ergonomics. We thought this was an upgrade from the previous version of the trail back that featured a rubber grip. The Trail Back uses a similar grip on the Black Diamond Trail Pro Shock ($140) but didn't feature the additional foam below the handle and obviously not the shock absorption system.
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Showing the grip of the Black Diamond Trail Back.
Credit: Ian Nicholson
Among foam gripped trekking poles the only pole that was far nicer was the Leki Carbonlite, but that pole literally costs $100 more. Except for users with big hands, most of our testers like the Trail Back better than the Komperdell C3 Carbon Compact which had a much larger diameter and bulkier feeling grip.
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The handle, strap, and grip of the Black Diamond Trail Back pole.
Credit: Ian Nicholson
A small amount of testers complained about chafing on their hands during hotter hikes, this tended be be more of a problem with rubber handled grips more than foam or to an even lesser extent, cork. With thought that the Trail Back chaffed less than the lighter weight Black Diamond Ultra Distance but still not as much as a cork gripped pole like the Leki Corklite, Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork or the Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork. The Trail Back certainly has a nice and above average grip comfort considering its $80 price tag, and is nicer than the similarly priced REI Traverse and there aren't maybe poles that we think are more comfortable in its price range. If you are using it for more mountaineering applications or don't mind a rubber grip and are willing to spend $20 more we do like the Leki Quantum ($100) handles better.
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Showing the upper part of the handle and palming surface of the Black Diamond Trail Back. While this pole wasn't the best for "palming" it was far better than nearly all of the other sub $100 poles.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Weight
The Black Diamond Trail back weighs in at 20 ounces, which a little above average overall among aluminum telescoping poles on the market. The Trail Back is 1 ounce heavier than our OutdoorGearLab Top Pick the Leki Corklite (19 oz) in which it is comparable in durability too, and 4 ounces heavier than our overall Editors' Choice the Black Diamond Carbon Cork (16 oz). Amazingly enough the Trail back weighs the same as its cousin the Trail Pro Shock (the shock absorbing version of the same pole) and is 2.5 ounces heavier the similarly priced REI Traverse (also $80 and 17.5 ounces). The Trail Back is much heavier than any of the "tent pole" style trekking poles like the Black Diamond Ultra Distance, Distance FL or Leki Micro Stick While the Trail Back isn't an exceptionally heavy pole, it isn't a very light pole either, but it does have a lot going for it, at an excellent price. Below average weight just isn't one of those things.

Packability
The Trail Back packs down to 64 cm or just over 25" in length, this is just barely above average among telescoping style trekking poles and around 7-12" longer than the folding tent pole style poles. Don't let this category be important to you for no reason. While at first, it might appear to be a bummer that the Trail Back poles don't collapse any shorter, they do collapse plenty short enough to strap to the side of a backpack or tuck into an average sized duffle bag or suitcase. If you do want a more compact trekking pole then look at the folding designed poles like the Black Diamond Ultra Distance or Distance, the Leki Micro Stick or Raidlight Foldable trail poles.

Durability
We found the Black Diamond Trail Back to be pretty darn durable. The FlickLock adjustment mechanism is a time proven design that's super easy to adjust and is just plain bomber. The shafts are tough and should stand up to hundreds of days of hiking, backpacking, and mountaineering. While you could certainly break these, we think several other poles we tested are likely to break first.
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Showing the FlickLock closure system on the Black Diamond Trail Back poles.
Credit: Ian Nicholson
Dislikes
There is not a whole lot we don't like about these poles, especially since Black Diamond upgraded the rubber handles to foam grips last year. The Trail Back poles are slightly heavier than average, being two ounces heavier than the similarly priced REI Traverse, but compared to the Traverse we likes the grips better on the Trail Back as well as the adjustment mechanism and think they are just plain more durable.
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Amanda Baker and her Trail Back trekking poles. The Trail Back was our OutdoorGearLab Best Buy award winner because it was basically the best pole for most people that costs under $100.
Credit: Ian Nicholson
Best Application
These poles are great for climbers, backpackers, trekkers, snowshoers, split boarders, and hikers. We wouldn't use these for backcountry skiing because we don't think they would last super long. You can buy four different sized baskets to put on them. They pack down pretty small and are just a good inexpensive, all-around pole. You can spend $30 more and get a shock absorbing version of the Trail Back called the Black Diamond Trail Shock that is also one of the more reasonably priced anti-shock poles.

Value
At $80 they are $10 more than the REI Traverse pole, but have nicer grips and a lot more durable and easy-to-use locking mechanism. While you can spend $40 to $60 more on poles and get even slightly nicer handles and lighter or stronger shaft sections, the Trail Back remains a solid, functional pole without all the frills but enough to make most folks happy.

Chris McNamara's Story
After getting a severe leg bruise, I had to hike to the top of El Capitan. Luckily, as we were driving into Yosemite Valley, the Yosemite Mountain Shop was open. I asked for their cheapest poles and they gave me the Trail. They literally saved my legs that day. I was able to put a lot of weight on my arms on the hike up. Then, when we rappelled the face of El Capitan to rig ropes for filming Steve Wampler's climb, these poles fit easily off to the side of my harness without getting caught in the ropes (the extra shortness was key). When we got to the base of El Capitan, I extended the poles again and used them to walk down to the car. I liked them so much I took them on my next El Capitan climb - something I had never done before. Because they are so compact, I could clip them under the haul bag with out them getting too tangled. When it came time for the East Ledges descent, out came the poles and saved my knees again!
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Black Diamond Trail Compact trekking poles getting ready to the East Ledges descent on El Capitan. Half Dome in the background.
Credit: Chris McNamara
Chris McNamara's Review
This is currently one of the best selling designs out there. It is super compact, light, and a great value (there are not many options that are cheaper). While I like it, I overall prefer the Black Diamond Trail Trekking Pole because the Trail Back is heavier, does not collapse as small, and does not have the extended foam below the main handle. However, if you are taller, you may want the Trail Back as it is six inches taller than the Trail. The main competitor is the Leki Quantum, which is about the same weight, extends longer but does not fold down quite as small. They are the same price. We like the Black Diamond locking system over the Leki because it seems more reliable and durable. That said, the Leki poles are a little sleeker and lighter. We lean toward the Black Diamond because of the locking mechanism but if you are tall or like longer poles, go with the Leki.
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Comparing the older (upper) and newer (lower) Black Diamond trail Back poles. We really like nearly all the updates that BD made to this pole including the more corrosion resistant finish on the lowest and middle sections.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Other Versions
Black Diamond Trail Shock - Same but has a shock and is a little heavier.
Black Diamond Trail Trekking Poles - Same but with a nicer grip that extends down and cost $20 more at $100.
Black Diamond Trail Ergo - Same but with a nicer yet angled cork grip that costs $120.
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Comparing the newer (left) and older (right) grips and handles of the Black Diamond Trail Back pole.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Ian Nicholson

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OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: August 4, 2014
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:   
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  • 5
 (4.0)
Average Customer Rating:   
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  • 5
 (4.5)

100% of 3 reviewers recommend it
Rating Distribution
5 Total Ratings
5 star: 40%  (2)
4 star: 60%  (3)
3 star: 0%  (0)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
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   Jul 23, 2014 - 01:59am
First off, Outdoor Gear Lab seems to be confused about which product they are reviewing here. The Black Diamond Trail Back has always had rubber grip, not a foam one. No comfy foam area to choke down on. The product they are testing seems to be the standard Trail model. But there are also pictures of the Trail Back on the page. Hopefully this website will figure out this problem and fix it.

But the Trail Back itself is a very good pole. A solid four star product. It's not flashy - it really is just three aluminum rods that lock together with a great locking system. The grip isn't the best on the market - you should know that you're getting a rubber grip, not a foam one. But if you know that and aren't bothered by it, these poles should work great for you.

It's an aluminum pole, meaning that there's no shock absorption in the pole material itself like you'd find on a carbon pole. Black Diamond has the best shock absorption systems on the market, but you'll have to spend a lot more money for it. I've done just fine without it, however. Like the reviewers here, I'll trade some rattling on my wrists for the security of a solid pole.

The Trail Back is a great pole for mountaineering, although it doesn't pack down super small like some other poles. With the powder baskets, they work pretty well for winter activities. I wouldn't use them for aggressive skiing, however.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Aug 4, 2014 - 05:49pm
These are great poles, but as the previous reviewer said, Outdoor Gear Lab is talking about two different poles in this review. Some pictures are the real product, others are a different model. The Trail Back doesn't have and has never had foam grips. This calls the entire review into question. This site is usually really professional, but the fact that they've let this review stay up for years really calls their reliability into question.
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   Aug 15, 2013 - 04:37pm
CDBahl · Hiker · Seattle
I've had these poles for a few years now, and they have withstood a lot of abuse. When faced with a descent that's got steep sections to scramble, I'll often just toss the poles to the bottom to free up my hands for the climb down. This is certainly not something I'd try with a carbon pole, and it saves a lot of time and hassle collapsing and stowing the poles in your pack.

If you're looking for a reliable, rugged, fully featured trekking pole, regardless of price, you'll be hard pressed to do better than these. The cheap price is just gravy on top.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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   Feb 14, 2012 - 12:04am
Ron · TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES
I can't believe this… These are the same trekking poles I bought from Walmart a few years ago. I'm sure that there Chinese in origin as a lot of Black Diamonds stuff is now days. But the set I bought are marketed under the name, "Outdoor Products". I haven't noticed them in Walmart lately so I suspect that Black Diamond has bought up the manufacturing rights on them. Same grips, straps, and locking mechanism. Their great. Took them to Costa Rica for almost three weeks and not a single issue or problem. Since Costa Rica they have received steady use here in the desert's of the southwest too. The locks are bomber and have never slipped. I almost rated them a clean 5 star but have had some bad luck with Black Diamond customer support on other products lately due to their offshore production. They couldn't tell me the length of a Deluxe Cliff Cabana pole I had lost due to the fact that it is manufactured in the Philippines and their warranty and repair division had no idea or way to order a replacement, or give me the size to make my own….. if product support isn't a big issue, and on a pair of trekking poles there really isn't much that can fail, I'd give a big thumbs up on these. I still use mine and they have to be at least 2 to 3 years old now. Wish they still had them at Walmart as they were less than half the price…. but I'd still pay the full price on them now as they really are bomber.

Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.
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Click to enlarge
The Black Diamond Trail Back trekking pole.
Credit: Black Diamond
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