The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Best Carry On Luggage

No matter what you need out of a carry-on, we'll help you identify the...
Photo: Cassandra Marin
Monday October 26, 2020
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Searching for the best piece of carry-on luggage? Our experts have tested 24 models over the past 6 years to bring you the 6 top carry-ons currently available. We tested them side-by-side and took them on planes, buses, and Uber rides, carting them across the country and across the world. From asphalt to gravel, we put some serious miles on these little wheels. Our team jammed them full of a week's worth of gear and lobbed them into overhead bins, tossed them in the trunk, and dropped them on concrete (just to see what would happen). We rocketed over curbs and bounced down stairs to bring you the best luggage for whatever your needs - and your budget - may be.

Top 6 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 6
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award  
Price $216.94 at Amazon$549.00 at Amazon$237.99 at Amazon$48.00 at Amazon$198.65 at Amazon
Overall Score
90
82
77
46
57
Star Rating
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Pros Magnetically aligned wheels, great organization, excellent capacity, professional styleExceptional compression, deceptively large capacity, professional design, smooth and simpleWheels magnetically aligned, solid design and organization, fair priceMany colors, easy to use, comes with lock, four double wheels, inexpensiveTons of organizational features, excellent bag add-on straps, durably built
Cons Easy to over pack, few color optionsMinimal features, only two wheels, expensiveEasy to over pack, uneven tapered shapeNot very durable, lacks organizational features, patterned interior isn't our favorite lookLoud wheels, extremely challenging zippers, "techy" look
Bottom Line For the frequent traveler, this is an extremely durable bag made to withstand thousands of miles flownAn extremely durable option that fits an impressive amount of stuffThis carry-on is ready for round the world action at a price that leaves room for a few in-flight beveragesAn inexpensive option that works well enough for infrequent travelers and kidsThis unique, feature-laced model is marred by tough-to-use zippers
Rating Categories Platinum Elite 21" Expandabl... Briggs and Riley Baseline Do... Crew 11 21" Expandable Spinn... Rockland Melbourne 20 Tarmac AWD Carry-On
Ease Of Use (35%)  
9
8
8
5
4
Storage & Features (30%)
9
8
7
4
6
Versatility (20%)
9
8
8
6
7
Durability (15%)
9
9
8
3
7
Specs Platinum Elite 21"... Briggs and Riley... Crew 11 21"... Rockland Melbourne... Tarmac AWD Carry-On
External Dimensions (in) H x W x D 23" x 14" x 10" 22" x 14" x 9" 23" x 14" x 10" 22" x 13" x 9" 22" x 14" x 9"
Handle Height Options (in) 36”, 38”, 40” and 42.5” 36", 39", 41" and 43" 36", 38”, 40” and 42.5” 34" and 39" 37", 39", and 41"
Number of Wheels 4 2 4 4 4
Number of Interior Pockets 5 2 3 2 4
Number of Exterior Pockets 4 3 4 0 2
Main Compartment Opening Style top flip-open top flip-open top flip-open clamshell - half split clamshell - half split
Measured Weight (lb) 8.5 lb 9.0 lb 7.8 lb 6.9 lb 8.2 lb
Compression System Compression cross straps with full-coverage mesh panels and accessory pockets Compression cross straps with full-coverage mesh panels and full-bag compression system Compression cross straps Elastic X bands Compression X straps
Expandable Yes - zipper Yes - internal Yes - zipper Yes - zipper Yes - zipper
Lock No - lockable Yes No - lockable Yes No - lockable
Main Material High-density nylon fabric with DuraGuard coating 95% Nylon High-quality ballistic nylon fabric with DuraGuard coating 100% ABS 1000D Helix Poly Twill and Polycarbonate shell
Unique Features Removable toiletry pouch, dedicated power bank pocket, removable hanger bag, magnets to keep wheels straight, included hidden name tag Built-in suiter, unique internal expansion-compression system, external handle stays for maximum internal storage, add-a-bag strap, included hidden name tag Dedicated power bank pocket, removable hanger bag, magnets to keep wheels straight, included hidden name tag Expands 1.5", included lock, hard shell design Hybrid hard/soft-sided design, coat keeper strap, expandable zipper, add-a-bag strap, internal laptop sleeve
Warranty Lifetime Lifetime Lifetime 3 year limited Lifetime

Best Overall Carry-On Luggage


Travelpro Platinum Elite 21" Expandable Spinner


Travelpro Platinum Elite 21" Expandable Spinner
Editors' Choice Award

$216.94
(27% off)
at Amazon
See It

90
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Use - 35% 9
  • Storage & Features - 30% 9
  • Versatility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 15% 9
Weight: 8.5 lb | Dimensions: 23" x 14" x 10"
Wheels magnetically align
Excellent organization
Deceptively large capacity
Professional look
Limited color options

The Platinum Elite is the back to back favorite amongst our review team. This bag really has it all. A plethora of outer pockets keep your belongings stowed, organized, and accessible. The interior pockets offer great organization for those who like options without cramping the style of packers who crave one big space. A removable toiletry case, a suit/dress organizer, and a hidden ID tag mean you'll have to purchase fewer extras before your vacation. Compression straps with mesh panels and integrated pockets help keep everything covered and securely in place no matter how bumpy the journey. Sturdy, gliding zippers and its sleek exterior make it a joy to use and provides a professional look even after years of scuffs and TSA handling. Four options for handle height allow excellent adjustability, and four pairs of smooth wheels supply quiet performance and solid clearance so you can roll over just about anything with ease. Magnets help lock the wheels into alignment for near-effortless rolling around the terminal. If you need to charge your electronics on the go, a discreet side pocket allows you to insert a battery pack and plug a USB cord directly into the back of the bag.

The space increasing features we enjoy like the expandable zipper and numerous front pockets make the bag a little large for standard carry on restrictions. However, it will easily fit in a standard overhead bin if you don't put too much in stuff in the front. If you are looking for a flashy neon or animal print carry on, the limited color options of the Platinum Elite are sure to be a let down. But if you're on the hunt for the one carry-on luggage to rule them all - from business trips to international vacations - this is it.

Read review: Travelpro Platinum Elite 21" Expandable Spinner

Best Bang for the Buck


Travelpro Crew 11 21" Expandable Spinner Suiter


Travelpro Crew 11 21" Expandable Spinner Suiter
Best Buy Award

$237.99
at Amazon
See It

77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Use - 35% 8
  • Storage & Features - 30% 7
  • Versatility - 20% 8
  • Durability - 15% 8
Weight: 7.8 lb | Dimensions: 23" x 14" x 10"
Four sets of magnetically aligned wheels
Good organization
Sturdy design
Relatively inexpensive
No removable toiletry bag
Tapered shape

We've come to expect a lot from the varied line of Travelpro bags, and the Crew 11 exceeds these lofty expectations. This four-wheeled suitcase boasts smooth, quiet wheels that magnetically align to keep you moving forward and reliable, low resistance zippers for easy access to all your packed goods. While it may not have as many pockets as the Platinum Elite model, it provides plenty of organizational benefits such as a non-removable toiletry bag, a removable suit/dress organizer, and a hidden ID tag. Despite its small appearance, it still boasts an impressive capacity with simple compression straps and an expandable main compartment to help accommodate as many extra outfits or souvenirs as you're willing to cram inside while still meeting carry-on size requirements. Its fabric exterior is both professional and durable, making this a bag you can confidently roll through a business conference to a beachside bungalow.

Though the Crew isn't quite as streamlined or conveniently organized as its more expensive cousin, the Platinum Elite, it's still nicer to use and more versatile than most of the competition. We aren't fans of its integrated toiletry bag and its funny tapered shape that is heavier on the bottom. But in the face of so many less-pleasant-to-use bags, those are mere trifles. Considering many bags cost two or three times what the Crew does, we think it's very well worth the price and is sure to last you through many adventures far from home.

Read review: Travelpro Crew 11 21" Expandable Spinner Suiter

Best on a Tight Budget


Rockland Melbourne 20


Rockland Melbourne 20
Best Buy Award

$48.00
(60% off)
at Amazon
See It

46
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Use - 35% 5
  • Storage & Features - 30% 4
  • Versatility - 20% 6
  • Durability - 15% 3
Weight: 6.9 lb | Dimensions: 22" x 13" x 9"
Easy to use
Comes in many colors
Four double wheels
Relatively inexpensive
Not particularly durable
Lacks many organizational features

The Rockland Melbourne 20 is one of the most affordable models we tested, and it comes with a 3-digit clip lock to secure the zipper. Despite being on the smaller side of the bunch, it still managed to pass our pack-for-a-week test. In case you pack more than we do, it also features an expansion zipper that's easy to use and provides an extra 1.5" of packing space. Four double wheels add stability and tracking to this hard-sided case, while the telescoping handle offers two heights for easy use. The textured, ABS plastic exterior helps to hide dings and scuffs from your travels while aiding in compressing your belongings and souvenirs for the return trip. And for fans of funky shades, this suitcase is available in over 20 different colors.

Up against some stiff competition, this no-frills box looks a little lackluster. Its clamshell design splits your belongings in half. One side is secured with a simple zipper across the entire space, while the other is loosely held in place with an overly stretchy x-shaped elastic band. In order to compress your contents, all the pressure is placed directly on zippers that aren't overly beefy in appearance. The telescoping handle is quite wobbly, and the on-body handles easily catch when pulled out, rather than retracting as they should. We've tested two colors of the Melbourne, both of which broke during our durability testing — one handle pulled off, and the other's shell cracked. However, if you're an infrequent traveler and treat your belongings carefully, the impressively low "sale" price of the Melbourne might just be exactly what you need.

Read review: Rockland Melbourne 20

Best for Serious Space


Briggs and Riley Baseline Domestic


Briggs and Riley Baseline Domestic
Top Pick Award

$549.00
(4% off)
at Amazon
See It

82
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Use - 35% 8
  • Storage & Features - 30% 8
  • Versatility - 20% 8
  • Durability - 15% 9
Weight: 9.0 lb | Dimensions: 22" x 14" x 9"
Innovative expansion/compression system
Impressive capacity
Sleek design
Smooth and easy to use
Expensive
Minimal organization features

Although it appears simple on the outside, we love the impressive capacity and durability of the Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic. It features a unique expansion/compression system on the inside of the bag that results in much more carrying capacity than any other bag we tested, despite being the same size on the outside. Its compression straps have large mesh panels that help downsize and secure your load. The internal expansion system lets you compress your contents after you zip the bag closed, squeezing it down to a neat, TSA-approved carry-on rectangle, without the typical bulge of an overstuffed bag. We're seriously impressed with how much we can fit into this bag and still easily slide it into an overhead bin. It's a professional-looking bag that is easy to roll and packs in some critical features like a suit and dress organizer and hidden ID tag. Its well-rounded design makes it an excellent choice for any style of travel.

If you're searching for a four-wheeled bag, unfortunately, this isn't one. However, its two wheels are quiet and smooth and about as painless to operate as this type of suitcase can be. This bag offers notable features but is light on organizational amenities that make packing, unpacking, and generally access easier. It's also one of the most expensive bags we tested. But if you're a chronic over-packer, a souvenir-collector, or a gifts-for-everyone kind of person, this carry-on bag is capable of holding far more then your average carry-on.

Read review: Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic


Why You Should Trust Us


We put together a team of travel bugs headed up by lead tester Maggie Brandenburg to test these bags in every possible way. Maggie is always traveling to places near and far, racking up serious frequent flyer miles. From ski trips in the Canadian Rockies and summer holidays in Italy to road trips across the continent and business trips around the US, she's a practiced packer who knows how to appreciate a great piece of luggage. She also lent these bags out to a veritable army of friends over holidays and for vacations to truly test what everyone loves — or hates — about a carry-on.

These bags flew all over, as both carry-on and checked baggage. We packed them to the gills to see how much they can hold and how well they handle when fully loaded. We rolled them over soft carpet and loose gravel, bumped them up and down curbs and stairs, and threw them on the ground to see how well they held up. Over years of testing, we've identified which bags are best for whatever your packing style, and which ones just aren't worth your money. As always, we buy all our gear at retail price and test it rigorously, side-by-side for a truly unbiased and comprehensive review.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Analysis and Test Results


There are many important factors when searching for the perfect piece of carry-on luggage. We divided our testing and evaluations into four mutually-exclusive metrics that make up everything we look for in a bag. We then weighed each metric appropriately, according to how important each is to a luggage's overall performance. First on the list is a bag's Ease of Use, quickly followed by its Storage & Features. These two metrics combined make up 65% of the score. We also considered each model's Versatility and Durability to adequately examine the total picture of each suitcase. Here we'll break down each metric into which bags performed best - and which fell short - to help you identify your ideal travel companion.

Related: Buying Advice for Carry-on Luggages
We&#039;ve spent months with each suitcase, traveling the country and the...
We've spent months with each suitcase, traveling the country and the world, to bring you the best carry-on for you, no matter how you like to travel.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Value


When it comes to options for packing your belongings for a trip, there are a ton of choices covering a wide range of prices. When it comes to rolling carry-on bags, we noticed an imperfect correlation between price and performance. Paying more for your luggage tends to get you more pockets, better rolling performance, and higher durability. However, there are a few models that impress us with their performance despite relatively lower price points.


The Travelpro Crew 11 manages to pack a smooth rolling experience, convenient organization, and a sturdy design into a reasonably priced bag. For the infrequent traveler, the even more affordable Rockland Melbourne 20 brings adequate performance to a simply designed, hard-sided case. If you're constantly traveling, it's worth investing more into a bag that can last through the abuse of being checked, running across parking lots, and cramming it to the brim. The Travelpro Platinum Elite outshines all the rest in our testing while being far from the most expensive option, making it a notably high-value item.

Ease of Use


One of the most important characteristics for a piece of carry-on luggage is how easy it is to use. This metric covers everything from rolling ability and handle functionality to zipper maneuverability, weight, and accessibility. We rolled bags over all kinds of uncomfortable terrain (like stairs and gravel) and stuffed them with the weirdest stuff (like ski boots and homemade cookies) to test each one to its limits. We used the telescoping handles and yanked on external handles, took laptops through TSA security checkpoints, and weighed each bag in all its various packed and unpacked stages. Some stand out while others fall short.


When it comes to wheels and rolling performance, we tested both two-wheeled and four-wheeled models. The two-wheeled models all rolled along rather predictably, transitioning well from polished floors to cracked pavement. The Briggs & Riley Baseline has small smooth-rolling wheels that can easily glide over bumps and cracks. Treaded wheels offer better performance over loose and rocky surfaces. While smooth wheels are much quieter, helping you to navigate the terminal without noisily drawing stares.

The 3.5 inch wheels on the Osprey Ozone (left, previously tested)...
The 3.5 inch wheels on the Osprey Ozone (left, previously tested) handled rough terrain better than the smaller 2.75 inch ones on the Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic (right).
Photo: Cam McKenzie Ring

Four-wheeled bags are much more variable in their performance. All the Travelpro bags we tested do a great job of rolling in a straight line because their wheels snap into alignment magnetically to make your life easier. The Eagle Creek Tarmac AWD and Rockland Melbourne aren't magnetically aligned but still do a pretty good job of rolling fairly straight. On the other side of the coin, the AmazonBasics Oxford pulls heavily to one side and is much more difficult to maneuver. In addition, the Oxford's telescoping handle is so loose and wiggly that it contributes even more to the challenge of getting this suitcase anywhere. These bags were actually such a pain to keep rolling straight that we frequently found ourselves dragging them behind us as if they only had two wheels, just to make the job easier.

In general, four-wheeled bags are easier to roll through a crowded airport or tight airplane aisle. In our testing, even a four-year-old was able to roll his own four-wheeled bag through the terminal! However, not all wheels are created equal - we especially like the handy, automatic magnetic alignment of the Travelpro bags.

Strong and easy to use handles make rolling, storing, and unloading the bag noticeably easier. Every carry-on we tested has a telescoping handle, and at least one side or top handle for maneuvering in close quarters. The Travelpro Platinum Elite and Crew 11 as well as the Briggs & Riley Baseline all have four possible heights for their telescoping handles, which gives you a "custom fit" for your height and preference. All of the other bags we tested have fewer multiple handle height options.

Not all telescoping handles are created equal. Some offer up to four...
Not all telescoping handles are created equal. Some offer up to four different heights to match your preference while others offer just one or two. Some are sturdy and strong while others are wobbly and difficult to steer with.
Photo: Cassandra Marin

Ease of access to your belongings is another really important part of this metric. The zippers and exterior pockets are hugely important in this regard. The TravelPro Platinum Elite and Briggs & Riley Baseline both have exceptionally smooth gliding zippers that have yet to get stuck in our testing. The Eagle Creek Tarmac has a very robust zipper that we were excited about based on durability. However, it quickly became apparent that it is challenging to slide around the four corners of the bag. We enjoyed the added levels of organization provided by the exterior pockets to keep your passport, wallet, and pens organized. It also has a dedicated laptop sleeve - though this is inside the bag, which is only convenient if you have TSA Pre-Check and don't need to remove your computer to get through security.

Zippers galore! Tons of exterior pockets can keep you organized...
Zippers galore! Tons of exterior pockets can keep you organized while you're out and about.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

True to form, the Platinum Elite has four exterior pockets that range from small enough to find coins and pens easily to large enough to hold your laptop or winter jacket. We enjoy all the options for staying hands-free through the airport, but they tend to make the bag extraordinarily bulky when packed full. On the flip side, the Baseline Domestic offers a configuration of exterior pockets that are useful and versatile but prevent you from overstuffing the bag to the point that you can no longer fit it in an overhead bin. It also has a handy pocket on the back that's perfect for sticking small objects you might want to keep separate - like keys, a phone, or even a small wallet.

The Travelpro Crew and Platinum Elite both feature a dedicated power...
The Travelpro Crew and Platinum Elite both feature a dedicated power bank pocket to hold your portable battery, making it easier to stay charged on the go.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Storage & Features


Nearly as key as a bag's Ease of Use is its ability to store, accommodate, and organize your belongings. We measured each bag's capacity and tested all pockets and organizational features. We pushed the limits of their expansion systems and asked our friends with a variety of neds and packing strategies to test them out. The ability to expand isn't enough if it's tricky to do or leaves your bag larger than carry-on restrictions. Having tons of pockets doesn't automatically make a bag great if those organizing features force you to pack a certain way, regardless of your preferences.


The way a piece of luggage opens also has fairly large implications for how you can pack it and how accommodating it is to various traveler strategies. A suitcase-style bag opens either by splitting in half, leaving each side with half of the main compartment's capacity or by the top flipping up to access the entire compartment as just one space. By splitting belongings in half, the Eagle Creek Tarmac and AmazonBasics Oxford force you to pack at least one side securely enough to flip upside down to close the luggage. These "half-shell models have a zippered flap to allow you to do that. However, this style of carry-on restricts the size, shape, and overall bulk of the possible items. For trips where you need larger items, like a winter jacket or two pairs of size 13 shoes, this configuration is challenging to use. Even with a suitcase full of small, summer clothes, fitting everything and staying organized in a half shell case is a larger challenge. For this reason, we prefer the ease and openness of top flip suitcases.

Clamshell suitcases are a bit more restrictive when it comes to what...
Clamshell suitcases are a bit more restrictive when it comes to what you can put in them and how you can organize them. We did a bit of Tetrising to fit everything required for a week of travel in this one.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

No matter how they open or what organizational scheme the bags offered, we put them all through our "pack for a week" capacity test. In this test, we crammed everything required for a week's worth of temperate-weather travel into each bag. The Travelpro Platinum Elite has a deceptively large capacity inside. It's five interior pockets are very useful for those who love features and help keep you organized even if you're place-hopping to a different spot every night. At the same time, the internal pockets are flat enough to press out of the way if multitudes of pockets aren't your thing and you'd prefer just one large cavity. We love the huge variety of packing styles - and the sheer amount of stuff - that this bag can accommodate. It also has one of our favorite sets of compression straps. By incorporating mesh panel pockets between the straps, this system provides much better coverage of your belongings, making it easier to cinch down everything you've packed, not just what fits under two thin straps.

Packing the same week&#039;s worth of contents into a top opening...
Packing the same week's worth of contents into a top opening suitcase is much simpler, and we find ourselves with more available space.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Similarly, the Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic has an excellent compression system. It lacks the pockets between straps and instead has just two large mesh panels that cover a huge amount of your bag's contents to really press a lot of clothes down into a little package. This piece of carry-on luggage is hands-down, our favorite for over-packing. The telescoping handle is attached to the outside of the bag, which keeps the inside a large clean rectangle. This is great for rigid items that are notoriously hard to pack around the handle casing.

The Briggs &amp;amp; Riley Baseline Domestic has a unique internal...
The Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic has a unique internal expansion system. The sides of the bag can be expanded over two inches to fit extra gear, and then the top can be pushed back down to compress it all in and still remain within the carry-on dimensions.
Photo: Cam McKenzie Ring

It also has one of the coolest, most unique compression systems we've ever seen. Instead of the traditional zipper expansion that tends to make your bag poofy and front heavy, the Baseline incorporates an interior system that lifts the top section of the bag to create an extra several inches of depth as you pack. Once you've put everything in and cinched down your load, the bag zips closed and by pressing on the top and bottom sides, the entire package compresses, leaving you with a clean rectangular piece of luggage with limited bulging. If that's not enough, a small exterior pocket on top reveals two straps that allow you to clip a second and third bag to the front and top of the suitcase. Doing this can make it difficult to let go of the bag because it will tip forward with such a front-heavy load, but for long walks through distant terminals, it's a relief to wheel everything and save your shoulders the ache.

The trifold suiter in the Briggs &amp;amp; Riley Baseline Domestic is a...
The trifold suiter in the Briggs & Riley Baseline Domestic is a great organizational feature to keep your suit or dress relatively wrinkle-free while you travel.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Also noteworthy is the Travelpro Crew 11. Though it lacks the compression panels and removable toiletry bag of the Platinum Elite, it still has a hidden ID tag and removable suit/dress organizer. It also has three internal pockets that can help you stay organized if you prefer a bag with pockets. It appears small, but we found this little suitcase can still hold a good amount of stuff so it's a great choice for a long weekend. It also has a simple zippered expansion section that lets you come home with more than you left with.

A few bags we tested allow you to charge your phone or tablet by...
A few bags we tested allow you to charge your phone or tablet by plugging it into the outside of the suitcase. It's a little above and beyond, but does help when you're running low on juice.
Photo: Cam McKenzie Ring

Although it's not our favorite bag, due to a difficult zipper and loud, clunky wheels, the Eagle Creek Tarmac AWD Carry-On is notable for having an extremely handy set of extra bag attachment straps. The strap designed to hold another bag on top of the suitcase employs a dual elastic strap that easily stretches over another bag and hooks onto the telescoping handle to hold it in place. It works just as well for laptop bags as it does large, overstuffed totes, or even standard backpacks. A small hook and strap let you hang an additional small bag or a bulky coat or sweater on the front of the suitcase. For truly hands-free travel, it's hard to beat a bag like this that can accommodate whatever else you're bringing.

The add-a-bag strap of the Eagle Creek Tarmac is an excellent...
The add-a-bag strap of the Eagle Creek Tarmac is an excellent feature that we'd love to see on more suitcases.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Versatility


Many of the award-winning bags cost as much as your plane ticket. With the elevated price tags, many will desire a well-rounded bag instead of a master of one. We evaluated many aspects of versatility, including additional features and add-ons - and their actual usefulness. Although style is subjective, our entire team of testers investigated the look of each model and gave their input as to its suitability to professional, adventure, casual, and fast-paced travel settings. After using these pieces of luggage for months on end, we've determined the best use for each one as well.


Once again, the TravelPro stands out from the crowd for having truly useful add-ons. The removable toiletry bag is not only convenient to use, but it's also transparent for easier passage through security checkpoints. It, along with the Crew 11 and Briggs & Riley, also has a removable suit or dress keeper as well as an integrated, hidden ID tag on the back of all three bags. The Platinum Elite is also, in our opinions, the most professional-looking bag we tested. This carry-on looks natural, whether you are wearing business attire or sweatpants and flip flops. Though it doesn't come with a cupholder or seat cushion (we wish!) considering the whole package all together, this is the most versatile carry-on luggage we tested.

The Travelpro Platinum Elite comes with a full suit/dress bag that...
The Travelpro Platinum Elite comes with a full suit/dress bag that can be removed and hung up when you reach your final destination.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

The Briggs & Riley Baseline and Travelpro Crew 11 are also both fairly versatile. In addition to their commonalities with the Platinum Elite, they're also both fairly professional-looking and include convenient extra features. The Crew 11 and the Platinum Elite have a dedicated power bank pocket with a USB port on the back for charging your phone as you hoof it to the next gate. The Baseline Domestic remains versatile in a sleek and simple design that's extremely functional. It, along with the Eagle Creek Tarmac, both come with TSA-approved locks.

The Travelpro Platinum Elite and Crew 11 both have a dedicated...
The Travelpro Platinum Elite and Crew 11 both have a dedicated pocket for your portable battery, that let you plug your phone into the back of your suitcase. In lieu of needing a battery while you travel, you've got an extra pocket on your bag.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

The AmazonBasics Oxford Expandable 20" is worth discussing here as a bit of a letdown. We were initially excited to see what looks like an all-inclusive package for an absurdly low price. It has four wheels, an integrated TSA-approved lock that snaps the zippers right into the edge of the suitcase, internal holding straps, and a hardshell design. Upon inspection and actual use, however, each one of these features was a disappointment. We've already mentioned the tendency of the wheels to pull hard to one side, and the extremely loose telescoping handle that makes controlling it a difficult task. The holding straps inside this suitcase aren't compression straps at all, and instead are very loose elastic that does nearly nothing to keep your possessions organized, let alone compressed. The integrated lock is more annoying to use than we'd anticipated, as you have to line up the zippers just right to fit them in. And of course, the hard shell design lacks any external pockets for organization or a laptop sleeve anywhere in the bag. The lock, along with several other elements of this bag, also proved to have significant durability issues, which we will discuss in the next section.

Though the AmazonBasics&#039; integrated lock seemed like a great...
Though the AmazonBasics' integrated lock seemed like a great feature, it failed to open again after the bag was dropped. We then had to break into it - which took a pair of pliers and about 30 seconds.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

Durability


After throwing down potentially several hundred dollars for your new luggage, you want to be sure it will last awhile. Ideally, this piece on wheels should last for years and through all kinds of adventures. We checked out the material each bag is made of, how well they're constructed, and their overall sturdiness. We did this through tons of travel over months of use, and also by purposely being hard on our luggage (through "accidental" drops and running into things).


According to numerous flight attendants, the main areas where carry-on luggage wears out are the handles and zippers, so we paid close attention to these areas. We examined and researched the materials of each bag. We also inspected the high wear areas of each bag, such as the wheels and corners.

Both the Briggs & Riley Baseline and Travelpro Platinum Elite are built well from durable, sturdy materials. These two bags are impressively durable with basically bombproof wheels and smooth, consistent zippers to solid handles and strong structural integrities. No matter how we threw them onto the cement or tumbled them down the stairs (all while packed full), they refused to be damaged. They're also designed to conceal the minor scuffs and scrapes they pick up along the way so nothing detracts from the bags' overall aesthetic.

Your bag is bound to pick up a few scrapes and scuffs as you use it...
Your bag is bound to pick up a few scrapes and scuffs as you use it, so finding one that doesn't look awful when it's worn is a definite bonus.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

The Travelpro Crew 11 is also pretty darn durable. It's made with noticeably lower quality materials and construction than the Platinum Elite, but still holds up very well to abuse. The sturdily designed handles of the Eagle Creek Tarmac encouraged confidence in the bag's durability.

The Maxlite was dented after checking it in. This sort of damage is...
The Maxlite was dented after checking it in. This sort of damage is not covered under the lifetime warranty.
Photo: Cam McKenzie Ring

While we like to focus on gear that performs well, two bags demonstrated such a lack of durability that we'd be remiss if we didn't mention them. The Rockland Melbourne 20 has an extremely rickety telescoping handle that makes this bag both difficult to control and inspires little confidence in its longevity. Additionally, we've tested two different colors of this wheeled box and both broke during our testing. In one, the wheel crushed into the corner of the bag's body when dropped and left a large crack in the ABS plastic shell. In the other, the top handle broke during regular use, even before we performed any more rigorous durability tests on it.

The grab handles of the Rockland are attached by flimsy tabs that...
The grab handles of the Rockland are attached by flimsy tabs that are easy to damaged. Part of this tab broke during our first trip with it.
Photo: Cam McKenzie Ring

The AmazonBasics Oxford is similarly flawed. It has an extremely wobbly handle that makes it much harder to use and control. It also broke during our durability testing. A "hubcap" from one of the wheels flew off when we dropped it, and enough tabs were broken off of it that we could barely reattach it. Additionally, after dropping it on the ground, the integrated lock stopped working. We couldn't get it to open up again no matter what we tried. In order to get to our belongings, we had to break into our own luggage using a pair of pliers - and this was concerningly easy. While a higher price doesn't always deliver better performance, these two are the least expensive we tested and by far the least impressive when it comes to durability.

A single drop from less than a foot off the ground sent a piece of...
A single drop from less than a foot off the ground sent a piece of the AmazonBasics Oxford's wheel flying. Fortunately this piece is just cosmetic, but a break that easily is never a good sign.
Photo: Maggie Brandenburg

One final consideration when it comes to gear durability is the warranty included with your new (expensive) bag. Most of the bags we tested come with some kind of warranty, though many of them only guarantee materials and workmanship - so if you check your bag and get it back missing a few pieces, you're out of luck. If you tend to be hard on your gear, you might consider one that covers wear and tear. Both Briggs & Riley and Eagle Creek claim they'll cover a lifetime of repairs no matter the cause. On the other hand, the ultra-cheap AmazonBasics Oxford doesn't come with any kind of warranty.

Choosing the right luggage for your needs and travel style can make...
Choosing the right luggage for your needs and travel style can make or break your adventures.
Photo: Cassandra Marin

Conclusion


Any cursory glance around the web reveals that choices of carry-on luggage go on for days. Sifting through seemingly identical bags and finding the right suitcase for you is a challenging task. Whether you like to have a separate pocket for everything or you prefer one giant cavern that can handle anything you put in it, there are plenty of options for you. We rigorously tested each model to find which ones are best for personal and professional trips, and we hope our findings help you narrow down which one is the right fit for your travel.

Maggie Brandenburg, Cassandra Marin, Cam McKenzie Ring