Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Portable Solar Charger of 2021

Photo: Jane Jackson
By Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Friday May 7, 2021
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Ready to join the solar revolution? Our portable solar panel experts have spent the past 9 years testing over 65 models; it's safe to say we know a thing or two about the latest in solar technology. For our 2021 update, we purchased the top 16 for hands-on testing. We subjected each panel to a series of rigorous tests across a wide range of metrics and narrowed in on the best of the best. We assessed their charging abilities in all types of conditions and have weighed and measured each one. From massive 50-watt panels to pocket-sized battery packs, we have tried them all. Car camping, backpacking, and daily life are all great opportunities to harness the power of the sun to charge electronics. The following review is a summary of our findings, with top picks for specific uses highlighted.

Top 16 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 16
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Awards   Best Buy Award  Editors' Choice Award 
Price $21.98 at Amazon$29.99 at Amazon$39.99 at Amazon$39.99 at Amazon$69.99 at Amazon
Overall Score
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79
Star Rating
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Pros Compact, lightweight, fast charging capabilitiesLightweight, durable, lots of charging optionsInexpensive, lightweight, portable, charges quicklyDurable, lightweight, slimEfficient, powerful, great value for its size, lightweight
Cons Only one USB port, lacks versatilityA bit bulky, slow charging speeds considering battery capacityLow output power, cannot charge multiple devices at onceSlow charging speeds, only one USB portPocket too small to hold extra cords and accessories
Bottom Line This little panel is by far the lightest in this review, but its charging abilities are impressiveA relatively lightweight battery pack with multiple charging options, this small model has a USB-C and wireless charging portThis panel impressed us with its fast charging speeds, lightweight design, and excellent priceA sleek and portable panel that has a relatively small capacity, and is slow to chargeA compact, lightweight panel with exceptional efficiency and charging capabilities
Rating Categories BEARTWO 10,000mAh Blavor Qi 10,000mAh ECEEN 13W ECEEN 10W Anker PowerPort 21W
Charging Speed (30%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
5.0
8.0
Charge Interruption Recovery (20%)
8.0
8.0
6.0
6.0
8.0
Multiple Device Charging Speed (20%)
0.0
4.0
4.0
0.0
9.0
Weight & Portability (20%) Sort Icon
10.0
10.0
9.0
9.0
7.0
Durability (10%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
9.0
7.0
Specs BEARTWO 10,000mAh Blavor Qi 10,000mAh ECEEN 13W ECEEN 10W Anker PowerPort 21W
Panel Size (watts) <5W <5W 13W 10W 21W
Weight (measured) 7.52 oz 8.3 oz 12 oz 12 oz 17.6 oz
# of USB outlets 2 2 2 1 2
Max USB Output Current (amps per port) 2.1 amp 2 amp 2 amp 1.5 amp 2 amp
Battery kit? Yes Yes No No No
Size folded 5.5" x 3" x 0.7" 6" x 3" x 0.5" 11.4" x 6.1" x 0.6" 12" x 6.5" x 0.8" 11" x 6.3" x 0.75"
Battery? Yes Yes No No No
Charge tablet? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Charge laptop? No No No No Yes
Panel Type Mono-crystalline Mono-crystalline Mono-crystalline Mono-crystalline Mono-crystalline
Size opened 5.5" x 3" x 0.7" 6" x 3" x 0.5" 11.4" x 14.3 x .15" 17.5" x 12" x 0.4" 26.3" x 11.1" x 0.2"
Battery input (Volts / Amps) 5V 2.1A 5V 2A N/a 6V 1.5A N/a
Charge capacity (mAh) 10,000mAh 10,000mAh N/a N/a N/a
Charge iPhone/Smartphone Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Direct USB Plug? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Daisy Chain? No Yes No No No
12-Volt connection No No No No No


Best Overall Solar Charger


BigBlue 3


80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 8
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 9
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 9
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 6
  • Durability - 10% 8
Weight: 23.5 oz | Number of USB outlets: 3
Efficient
Functions in marginal conditions
Auto-restart function
Struggles to charge multiple devices
Bulky

The Big Blue 3 goes above and beyond the rest. It maintains its place at the top of the pack for another year, thanks to its impressive charging abilities and consistent performance across the board. Though there may be other options out there that charge faster or look flashier, nothing beats this model when it comes to overall performance. When your electronics need a boost, this panel will deliver a substantial charge in various conditions. In terms of features, we love the built-in ammeter and the zippered accessory pouch. We also appreciate this panel's simplicity and reasonable price tag. With three USB ports and a classic fold-out design, the BigBlue is an excellent all-arounder that will efficiently charge most small gadgets.

One downside to this panel is its weight. Weighing in at 23.5 ounces, it's a bit heavy. As a result, it's better suited for frontcountry use, though it will excel wherever you use it. Other than its weight, this panel receives high marks across the board.

Read review: BigBlue 3

Another Excellent Performer


Anker PowerPort 21W


79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 8
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 8
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 9
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7
Weight: 17.6 oz | Panel Size: 21 Watts
Efficient
Powerful
Great value for its size
Lightweight
Pocket too small to hold extra cords and accessories

Year after year, the Anker 21W continues to be a high scorer. It has all the same attributes as the 15W, but with 6W more power. It has a fast-charging speed: 3 hours and 40 minutes to charge a 6,000 mAh external battery in full sun, one of the faster in our review. It was also excellent at charging multiple devices at once, and it handled charge interruption as well as you could expect.

It's not the lightest model that we tested, but it is one of the lightest 20+ watts and up option. Its tri-folding design is about the size of a magazine and is easy to store. This contender was hard to beat when it came to charging capabilities, weight, and price.

Read review: Anker PowerPort 21W

Best Bang for the Buck


Goertek 25,000mAh


79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 8
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 8
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 9
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7
Weight: 19 oz | Number of USB outlets: 3
Reasonably priced
Portable size
Functioning solar panel, despite size
Fast charging capabilities
Heavy
Hard to replenish battery via solar

The Goertek 25,000mAh battery pack is a high-capacity battery; it has three USB ports that deliver rapid charge to small electronics. We love that it has a large capacity and can fully charge a phone multiple times when the battery is topped off. Additionally, the small solar panel works well enough for the battery to replenish using solar, even if it takes a few hours. In addition to all these great features, the Goertek rings in as one of the most reasonably priced options for solar charger set-ups.

Our issues with this battery pack are similar to the problems we've had with other battery pack/solar options — patience is required. This product does not work great as a solar charger alone; if you're planning to fully charge the 25,000mAh battery off the sun, give yourself a few full days. That said, the panel will continue to trickle charge the battery pack, even when small electronics are plugged in, which is a feature that we appreciate.

Read review: Goertek Solar

Another Excellent Value


Ryno-Tuff 21W


74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 9
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 7
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 6
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7
Weight: 17 oz | Number of USB outlets: 2
Lightning fast charging
Fairly lightweight
Can charge multiple devices effectively
Reasonably priced
Doesn't work great in marginal conditions

The Ryno-Tuff impressed us with its charging abilities right off the bat. In our first round of testing, this panel soared above its competitors in charging speed, charging our phones over 30% in 30 minutes. This is impressive for any panel, let alone a humble 21W model. The Ryno-Tuff also works fairly well at charging multiple devices simultaneously, even though its claimed output isn't all that impressive. The panel is also durable and relatively compact, making it portable enough for trips into the backcountry. This combination of features, plus a reasonable price tag, make this panel an excellent option for those on a budget.

We had a few complaints with this panel, but they are all fairly minor. First of all, the storage pocket is very small and barely fits a phone, making it feel a bit useless. Additionally, the Ryno-Tuff ended up with some underwhelming results in our interruption recovery tests, showing that it is not the best option for use in marginal conditions.

Read review: Ryno-Tuff 21W

Offers Rugged Construction


BioLite SolarPanel 10+


63
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 8
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 8
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 0
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 7
  • Durability - 10% 9
Weight: 19.2 oz | Number of USB outlets: 1
Sleek design
Durable construction
Portable size and shape
Built-in battery adds efficiency
No storage pocket
Expensive

The BioLite 10+ is notable for its durability and portability. Its rugged construction makes it incredibly reliable, as does its hidden built-in battery pack. The battery regulates charge, so the panel works reasonably well in sub-optimal charging conditions. We liked the kickstand and fold-out design, as it's sleek and portable enough to fit into our backpacks on most light and fast missions.

The major downside to the BioLite is its price tag; this panel and its name-brand recognition come at a price. For us, its durability and overall performance outweigh the initial investment, but it's something to consider. There are plenty of less durable panels out there that will perform well, but few can stand up in terms of overall design and construction.

Read review: BioLite 10+

Excellent Lightning Fast Charging Speeds


SunJack 25W


74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Charging Speed - 30% 9
  • Charge Interruption Recovery - 20% 7
  • Multiple Device Charging Speed - 20% 9
  • Weight & Portability - 20% 3
  • Durability - 10% 9
Weight: 30.1 oz | Number of USB outlets: 2
Durable construction
Thoughtful design with great storage pocket
Very fast charging speeds
Works well in marginal conditions
Expensive
Bulky

Though it is doesn't have the highest listed wattage of any panel in this review, the SunJack 25W wowed us with its impressive performance. It rapidly and easily charged our cell phones, external battery packs, and other random electronic gadgets. It boasts some of the fastest charging speeds we've seen in testing. Plus, its impressive build and durable construction are confidence-inspiring. It also performed well when partially shaded or in partially cloudy conditions, which many of its competitors failed to do.

The significant downsides are its price and size. If it were a bit smaller or lighter, it would have ranked higher on our list. However, the Sunjack remains an excellent option, with fast charging speeds.

Read review SunJack 25W

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
80
$80
Editors' Choice Award
For an inexpensive, easy to use, and efficient option, purchasing this panel is a no brainer
79
$90
Editors' Choice Award
This panel is efficient in varying conditions and can charge multiple devices
79
$50
Best Buy Award
For a small battery pack with solar capabilities, this is an impressive product
77
$29
This reasonably priced battery pack's most notable feature is its wireless charging station
74
$120
Top Pick Award
Provides quick charge times, a durable design, and a roomy mesh pocket
74
$55
Best Buy Award
This panel is not only efficient and powerful, but also affordable
70
$40
Best Buy Award
This lightweight 13W panel is able to deliver a steady charge to a single device, but lacks in its ability to charge multiple devices at once
68
$30
A fast, charging compact panel that is all about simplicity
68
$100
This panel is a charging machine, but it also weighs more than many of the more portable options in this review
65
$229
A well-thought-out panel and battery combo that charges laptops
63
$140
Top Pick Award
With a smart design and decent scores in overall performance, this panel is impressive
56
$260
This panel works well in marginal conditions and can feed large, hungry gadgets
54
$40
This 10W panel takes a while to charge electronics, but has a unique design
49
$75
A quick-charger, but falls short in charge interruption recovery and durability
49
$250
This panel is large, powerful, and expensive
31
$150
We were a bit disappointed by its ability to deliver a consistent charge to our electronics

An assortment of test subjects - ready for the sun.
An assortment of test subjects - ready for the sun.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Why You Should Trust Us


Jane Jackson authors this review and spend 200+ days a year outside using and testing gear. For the past few years, she has spent the summer months in Yosemite and the High Sierra, working for Yosemite Search and Rescue. In other months, she travels in pursuit of perfect climbing conditions, which means lots of sun (and lots of opportunities to test portable solar chargers!). Between Yosemite and the desert Southwest, Jane is no stranger to relentlessly sunny days. When she's not living in her van, which is complete with its own solar setup, Jane is in the backcountry, using these smaller, portable panels to keep her electronics charged.

We put this comprehensive review together after researching over 80 different products on the market. After perusing several reviews, we carefully selected and bought the best of the best. Then, we tested each product objectively and thoroughly. We look at how quickly each model charges with different amounts of sunlight, how it handles multiple devices at once, the rate of charging, and its portability and durability. To test our metrics, we used each contender in the field. Our process reflects the most up-to-date products, with updates occurring multiple times per year.

Related: How We Tested Solar Chargers

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Analysis and Test Results


Now more than ever, solar technology is growing in popularity. In this updated review, we've tested a wide variety of portable models. Our current line-up includes small panels with built-in battery packs to massive 50W behemoths. By spending time testing these solar panels on the road, we get to see first hand the latest and greatest #vanlife solar setups. After looking over several options, we rated each on five important metrics. Whether you are looking for a solar set up for car camping or a compact charger to power your iPhone while on a backpacking trip, our review offers excellent recommendations for anybody.

Related: Buying Advice for Solar Chargers

Dozens of companies produce affordable, effective monocrystalline panels ranging from small 5W models to more substantial, powerful options that will allow for a faster charge. These monocrystalline models are much more effective and lightweight than their polycrystalline forefathers. We tested a few small wattage models that were portable and lightweight, like the Renogy 15,000mAh, which has an integrated battery pack along with a small 2W panel. We also tested the Goertek 25,000mAh, which is a similar design but with a larger capacity battery and a 5W panel. The BEARTWO 10,000mAh is one of the most compact and lightweight battery packs we tested, with impressive charging speeds.

The gigantic Powertraveller laid out in full desert sun.
The gigantic Powertraveller laid out in full desert sun.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Joining the ECEEN in the mid-capacity range is the BioLite 10+ and the Goal Zero 14W. Next, we filled out the upper end of the wattage range, with the addition of the Anker 21, the SunJack 25, and the Ryno-Tuff. On the far upper end of the spectrum, we added the Powertraveller Falcon, BigBlue 42, and the Goal Zero Nomad 50. In general, solar technology is improving, and most panels performed fairly well. That said, it's important to note that in this review, the panels' metric ratings range in scores, mostly due to their output capabilities (i.e., wattage), rather than the design of the models themselves.

Just as was the case in past reviews, panels with large-capacity battery packs and small-capacity solar panels tend to charge our electronics quickly but take eons to charge via the sun. With this style of charger, we recommend topping off your battery pack at home before bringing it into the field.

The Voltaic is still the go-to for charging computers. The large capacity battery that comes with this setup still takes a good chunk of time to charge via the 20W panel, but we like the streamlined nature of this setup. That said, the BigBlue 42 and the Goal Zero Nomad 50 can work for laptops as well.

The panels in this review range from massive 50W options to tiny...
The panels in this review range from massive 50W options to tiny battery packs.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Value


Unlike some other products we test here at OutdoorGearLab (we've tested bikes that cost more than our cars!), portable solar chargers tend to be on the affordable end of the outdoor gear spectrum. However, even with such a reasonable price point, some models had much better value than others. For example, the reasonably priced ECEEN 10W and Goertek performed exceptionally well across the board, even standing up to some of the more expensive, higher capacity models. Other models, like the Goal Zero Nomad 50, cost a pretty penny and did not compare to the high scorers in our side-by-side tests.


Charge Interruption Recovery


Here we consider the following questions: is your panel going to quit on you just because one cloud passes overhead, as you left it out on what appeared to be a clear afternoon? Or is the solar model strapped to your backpack, causing your phone to constantly vibrate as the connection goes in and out of the USB port? These are the questions we addressed in our charge interruption recovery metric. To test this criterion, we measured the amount each model charged within a half-hour span, first in full sun and then again in intermittent sun and shade. We also measured the output power before and after the charge interruption to see if the model could get back on track after being shaded.


All the surface area on this BigBlue 42 helps the panel endure...
All the surface area on this BigBlue 42 helps the panel endure interruptions.
Photo: Jane Jackson

The highest performing models in this category were the ones with a large capacity (15-20W or higher) or a built-in external battery. The Renogy 15,000mAh and BioLite 10+ have built-in battery packs that can sequester energy and meter it out to plugged-in electronics, regardless of the sun quality. That said, though small battery/panel combos, like the Goertek, can manage shade — since it continues to charge your device off the battery — the panels themselves are too small to receive substantial power from the sun. The panel capacity of these models means their solar production provides a back-up as opposed to a primary power source.

Compared to the BigBlue, the Falcon has a larger surface area with...
Compared to the BigBlue, the Falcon has a larger surface area with solar cells, improving its performance in this metric.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Those with a larger surface area also tended to do better in this metric because there are more cells exposed to the sun at one time. This is one of the significant benefits of the Powertraveller Falcon 40, which has tons of surface area and a large capacity. The BigBlue 3, which has lots of surface area as well, also comes with a built-in auto-restart function. This feature allows the panel to reconnect to your device after being shaded automatically. Naturally, the unit will still charge slower in cloudy conditions. The auto-restart feature will help to continue the flow of power in less-than-ideal charging conditions. It also helps avoid the constant vibrating that happens when a phone is continually reconnecting to a panel.

These are the types of conditions we wish for when charging...
These are the types of conditions we wish for when charging electronics using solar power.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Charging Speed


The main use for a portable solar panel is charging a cell phone when electricity is not readily available. We took this into account when we weighted charging speed as our highest rating testing metric. To execute this experiment, we used our lead tester's personal cell phone — a Google Pixel 3. We timed each panel as it charged our phone and also used a standard small-capacity battery pack to cross-reference our results. It should be noted that in previous iterations of this test, we used an iPhone 6, which is also reflected.


To test the panels, we set each one in full sun for thirty minutes and noted how much charge the phone received. This way, we could obtain a good read on how efficiently the individual models worked over extended periods. We also timed how long it took each one to charge our 10,000 mAh portable battery packs, so we had that data to compare as well. In general, this size battery can charge an iPhone from 0 to 100% about two times.

We found a broad range in the ability to charge batteries, from literally not charging the battery pack at all, like the Goal Zero Nomad 14W, to charging it up a whopping 17% in 30 minutes, like the ECEEN. This considerable variability is due to the extensive range in output power of the contenders we tested. Twenty-one watts is four times as powerful as a 5W device, so it makes sense that panels like the BigBlue earned one of the highest in our testing. The Ryno-Tuff 21W also impressed us in this metric, especially considering its humble 21-watt capacity. This panel charged our phone 34% over the course of a 30 minute period.

Using this USB multimeter, we found that the measured output was...
Using this USB multimeter, we found that the measured output was often less than what the manufacturers' claimed.
Photo: Jane Jackson

The main function of a solar charger is to charge electronics efficiently. Therefore, we recommend investing in a higher wattage charger to facilitate this function. For speed and efficiency, a more effective watt option is more efficient. That is unless you're trying to save weight or money, in which case a less powerful model might be a good compromise. With that in mind, it's no surprise that some of our highest scoring panels in this metric were panels with the largest capacity.

Multiple Device Charging Speed


As you might guess, when tasked with the challenge of charging multiple devices at once, the more powerful models performed better than lower wattage models. Smaller panels such as the 5W and 7W models don't have the power to sustain two gadgets at once. If this is a priority for you, then select a panel with a higher wattage. Generally, our testing found lower watt models to be less capable in this metric than the higher watt devices that can charge two devices.


The Big Blue, Anker 21, and SunJack were high scorers, as was the Goertek. As discussed above, the results show that models with higher wattage are more effective at charging multiple devices at once. We were impressed by the SunJack's overall power and efficiency in this metric. Panels with built-in battery packs also excel in this metric, with the Goertek holding its own.

Both the ECEEN and the Blavor impressed us with their burly designs.
Both the ECEEN and the Blavor impressed us with their burly designs.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Durability


By design, portable solar panels need to be able to withstand long exposure to the elements. The way to get ample charge to small electronics is by leaving the panels exposed to the sun for long periods. To ensure these panels are up to the task, we have tested them in all kinds of conditions — from baking desert sun to high alpine terrain to extreme wind and rain. In general, almost all the panels stood up to the challenge. The canvas protective fabric is like an exoskeleton guarding the important insides of the panels. Solar technology seems to be advancing too, with companies working to make cells more durable and resistant to sun and water damage.


When scanning through reviews online, we noticed complaints about various models withering and warping in the sun. Because of this, we were extra vigilant, even when we set them out in the blazing southern Utah desert sun. In our testing period, none of the chargers endured much damage. These are robust machines, and with technology advancing every year, solar panel companies have come leaps and bounds in the construction of portable options.

There is a fine line between exposure and turning your panel into a...
There is a fine line between exposure and turning your panel into a frying pan. Be aware that some panels will warp if left out in very hot conditions.
Photo: Jane Jackson

We appreciated the external storage options on the Anker 21W and the BigBlue 3. These pockets not only protect extra gadgets but also keep the USB ports protected. The ECEEN 10W has a cool neoprene pocket that inspired confidence in wet conditions and kept dirt out of the USB port. The BioLite 10+ is incredibly durable in its construction.

These panels lack canvas covers but instead are made from solid...
These panels lack canvas covers but instead are made from solid plastic that improves their overall durability.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Weight and Portability


Since an essential function of many of these panels is to remain portable, this is a crucial category. A model that is too heavy or bulky will be left behind to collect dust in the closet rather than accompany you on your next adventure.

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The panels that cleaned up in this metric in terms of weight were the Blavor Qi 10,000mAh and the BEARTWO 10,000mAh. These models are the latest in battery-pack/solar charger combos, and we were impressed to see manufacturers getting this design into such a compact shape and size. These two panels weigh 8.3 ounces and 7.52 ounces, respectively.

Small panels, like the BEARTWO, are easy to throw into a bag without...
Small panels, like the BEARTWO, are easy to throw into a bag without much thought about weight or size.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Others come with lots of accessories and extra features, which make them more exciting to use but also make them bulky and unappealing to carry on long trips. There is a happy medium between overkill and overly simple, which of course, depends on your preference and needs.

The Falcon is definitely one of the largest panels we&#039;ve used in a...
The Falcon is definitely one of the largest panels we've used in a while.
Photo: Jane Jackson

While portability is a critical consideration, we placed more emphasis on performance. If the panel doesn't work, then it is just training weight. That was our reasoning behind handing out awards to larger panels like the BigBlue 3.

Here&#039;s the tiny Renogy panel in comparison to a standard Climbing...
Here's the tiny Renogy panel in comparison to a standard Climbing magazine. They are about the same thickness, but the Renogy has a much smaller footprint.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Accessories


To standardize our testing and procedures, we used the same 10,000 mAh battery pack and USB cord when testing all models. The battery we used is a well-reviewed and inexpensive pack designed to charge small gadgets and phones.

The Voltaic comes with its own 24,000mAh battery pack. Most panels...
The Voltaic comes with its own 24,000mAh battery pack. Most panels come with some form of accessories, ranging from carabiners to battery packs.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Panels that don't come with a built-in battery are often paired with a portable external battery pack. This arrangement allows the panel to charge the battery during the day while you're using your devices, and you can charge your device at night via the external battery. External batteries are an essential addition to any portable charging kit. Most modern tablets and smartphones demand higher power (like 2A charging ports), and this becomes harder to produce from the sun (which is variable at best). Instead of bulking up the solar panels themselves and making them too cumbersome to use, we found it much more effective to simply charge external batteries on a rotating system to keep a constant stockpile of fully charged battery packs ready to go. That way, you have a lighter weight solar charger that charges a high-quality external battery. This battery can, in turn, produce the necessary 2A of current to charge small devices.

Some of our testing fleet catching rays under the watchful eye of...
Some of our testing fleet catching rays under the watchful eye of Castleton Tower in Southern Utah.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Conclusion


Deciding on the right solar charger can be an overwhelming task. To make it easier to wrap your head around, you'll want to figure out what you will be using it for and go from there. Are you running a mobile office and need to keep multiple, energy-hungry devices happy? Or are you concerned with having a fully charged phone on a weekend excursion?

The smaller watt options are going to be less expensive and often less powerful. As you increase the wattage, the panels typically become more efficient. The sky is the limit, but it depends on how much money you are willing to spend. We narrowed in on the top competitors and put them to the test. Some perform better than others, and a higher price tag doesn't necessarily mean a better product. We hope that our thorough tests and reviews of these products will be useful to you as you shop around for your new solar charger.

Jane Jackson