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Black Diamond Fritschi Tecton 12 Review

For truly hard charging skiers, or for those that are intimidated by the unfamiliar look of “standard” tech bindings, this fills an important niche.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $650 List | $487.99 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Ski performance nearly on par with alpine bindings
Cons:  Heavier than most tech bindings
Manufacturer:   Black Diamond
By Jediah Porter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 22, 2019
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55
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 10
  • Touring Performance - 30% 5
  • Downhill performance - 25% 8
  • Weight - 25% 4
  • Ease of Use - 15% 4
  • Durability - 5% 7

Our Verdict

We dig the Black Diamond Tecton. In many ways, this is the binding that a particular, very vocal subset of backcountry skiers has been looking for. It skis nearly as well as an alpine binding, features DIN/TUV release certification, and offers at least some of the uphill advantages of a tech binding. It is very close in design and performance to the Marker KingPin. Downhill, our testers couldn't tell the difference between them. The Fritschi is a little easier in transitions and has a significant weight advantage over the KingPin; the Kingpin has also been plagued by some recent recalls.

For these reasons, the Tecton earns our Top Pick award for truly hard-charging backcountry skiers. Buyer beware, though, as the Tecton is a specialized piece of equipment. Only those skiing like they should be in a TGR film will really take advantage of the weighty and spendy attributes of this niche product. This is our Top Pick for truly hard-charging skiers; you've gotta weigh more than 170, drop cliffs, and have a long alpine racing background to fully and truly realize the performance gains. If you fit this description, we can't speak highly enough of the Tecton.


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Pros Ski performance nearly on par with alpine bindingsLight, solid, just the right set of featuresLight, innovative downhill performanceLight, simple, advanced features for the weight.Solid, reliable ski bindings, excellent toe piece entry and easy heel lifter transitions
Cons Heavier than most tech bindingsNot ideal for truly hard-charging downhill skiersunsophisticated heel lifters, untested aftermarket brakeCrampon mount and brakes not included, heavier than closest competitionNo ski brake option, heavier than bindings with the same or more features
Bottom Line For truly hard charging skiers, or for those that are intimidated by the unfamiliar look of “standard” tech bindings, this fills an important niche.This minimalist binding has exactly what most of you should want, and nothing you don’t need.Excellent bindings for all-around human powered skiing.A solid, simple contender with significantly more features than bindings just a little lighter.These Canadian bindings use a now-proven overall design and include the latest of the greatest usability benefits; we only wish they were lighter.
Rating Categories Fritschi Tecton 12 Atomic Backland Tour Marker Alpinist 12 G3 Zed 12 G3 Ion LT 12
Touring Performance (30%)
10
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5
10
0
8
10
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7
10
0
8
10
0
9
Downhill Performance (25%)
10
0
8
10
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6
10
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7
10
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7
10
0
5
Weight (25%)
10
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4
10
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7
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8
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6
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5
Ease Of Use (15%)
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9
Durability (5%)
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8
Specs Fritschi Tecton 12 Atomic Backland Tour Marker Alpinist 12 G3 Zed 12 G3 Ion LT 12
Weight (pounds for pair) 3.06 lbs 1.26 lbs 1.18 lbs 1.6 lbs 2.13 lbs
Release value range 5 to 12 "Men", "Women", "Expert" 6 to 12 5 to 12 5 to 12
Stack height. (mm. average of toe and heel pin height) 46 37 36 41 46
Toe/Heel Delta. (mm difference in height between heel pins and toe pins) 9 10 3 4 12.5
Brake options 100, 110, 120 80, 90, 100, 110, 120 90, 105,115 mm 85, 100, 115, 130 mm No brakes
ISO/DIN Certified? Yes No No No No
Ski Crampon compatible? Only Fritschi brand Yes. "Standard" Dynafit/ B&D style. Yes. "Standard" Dynafit/ B&D Style With aftermarket part. Only G3 brand. With aftermarket part. Only G3 brand.

Our Analysis and Test Results

There was a time when this sort of binding was a pipe dream, or one cobbled together in rumored basements. It is a relatively simple idea, with complicated execution. The Tecton combines a tech style toe and its associated efficiency advantages, with an alpine-style heel and its associated downhill performance, and release characteristic advantages. For truly hard-charging skiers (and we mean real hard… You've gotta be skiing like you're eligible for the Freeride World Tour to fully realize all the advantages of the Fritschi Tecton) there are few products like this on the market, and none are as suitable as the Tecton.

Performance Comparison


For tracked up  high pressure spell  firm and chunky backcountry skiing  the elasticity of the Tecton is welcome. Provided you're skiing hard and fast enough.
For tracked up, high pressure spell, firm and chunky backcountry skiing, the elasticity of the Tecton is welcome. Provided you're skiing hard and fast enough.

Touring Performance


The touring performance of the Tecton is a mixed bag. How well you might think it tours depends on what you are comparing it to; as compared to any frame style bindings, it is a joy. As compared to the full tech style bindings, it has real limitations. First, the advantages. The Tecton uses a tech style toe, therein eliminating all pivoting binding weight. In this way, it is the same as all other tech style bindings. However, there, the comparison ends. In addition to being heavier than most tech style bindings (we score weight elsewhere), the Tecton is more prone to icing up, has more flex in the locked toe piece, and has limited pivot range of motion.

All the moving parts and hardware of the Tecton collect more snow and ice than the smaller, simpler bindings. This inhibits touring performance. The toe piece of the Tecton is innovative. It has significant and important attributes that make the binding, overall, release more safely than other tech bindings. These attributes, though, make the locked, touring-mode interface more flexible than regular tech bindings. When you are accustomed to typical tech bindings, this flex is noticeable and unnerving. For hard snow, steep skinning, and side-hilling, the flex at the toe affects performance. Finally, the bulkier construction of the Tecton toe inhibits boot pivot range. For normal skinning, this is not a problem. For steep kick turns, where you really want to get the tip of your ski to your knee, the Tecton won't cooperate. You will need to adjust kick turn technique accordingly.


The Tecton's touring performance is almost exactly on par with that its closest competitor. Both leave the binding heel weight on the ski, both ice up some, and both have less toe pivot range of motion than other tech bindings. The Tecton tours way, way better than any of the frame bindings. All the other tech style bindings tour better than the Tecton.

The Tecton side by side with the Editors' Choice Atomic Backland. The Backland is more typical in toe piece construction. The Tecton (behind  with the white boot in it) offers a more limited range of motion.
The Tecton side by side with the Editors' Choice Atomic Backland. The Backland is more typical in toe piece construction. The Tecton (behind, with the white boot in it) offers a more limited range of motion.

Downhill Performance


This is where the Tecton shines. It skis downhill better than all but the beefiest frame style bindings. It skis better than the less sophisticated frame bindings even. The key is that alpine-style heel piece. Full tech bindings are brilliant, and more than enough for most skiers in most circumstances. However, their release is compromised, and the energy transfer is less direct than with the Tecton. The Tecton accomplishes more sophisticated ski performance by directing the force from the sole of the skier's boot, at least at the heel, down onto the ski. Regular tech bindings transfer that force through the heel pins, indirectly to the ski.

The Tecton in downhill mode  on refrozen crud  with big boots and big skis. This is what it's made for. Do you have what it takes to realize these advantages?
The Tecton in downhill mode, on refrozen crud, with big boots and big skis. This is what it's made for. Do you have what it takes to realize these advantages?

The Tecton also offers release "elasticity", which helps both release performance and routine downhill performance. A little background here helps. To prevent injury, ski bindings need to let you go; they need to give into forces pushing your boot out of the binding. To work at all, they need to hold your foot on the ski; they need to resist forces pushing your boot out of the binding. Some of the forces that prompt a release are the same forces that the binding needs to resist. This is "confusing" for a binding. Alpine bindings address this with "elasticity". In "normal" ski forces, your foot can be displaced side to side and up and down. In an alpine binding, when the normal ski forces are relieved before the next turn, your boot returns to center and is ready for the next set of forces. If that force continues past "normal", the boot is eventually released, and your joints are spared the leverage.

Traditional tech bindings, for a variety of reasons, have very little elasticity; this leads to, in some situations, that are likely far rarer than is reported, so-called "pre-release". Your binding "thinks" that a normal force is an injury force and sends the ski off your foot. Basically, the Tecton has some alpine style "elasticity". In this way, hard and heavy skiers can push the equipment further without fear of inadvertent release, yet have the confidence that the binding will release when truly needed. Finally, the Tecton releases in more directions with more industry approval than other tech style bindings.


Let us qualify the value of elasticity and downhill performance. It is true that the downhill performance advantages of the Tecton are "for real". Now, it is also true that everything that can be skied has been skied on simpler, lighter, tech style bindings with "poorer downhill performance". We have a test team with deep experience and high standards for performance. We like the confidence of skiing with the Tecton, but it isn't that much different. It is our opinion that 99.9% of skiers cannot realize the performance gains of the product. You may ski hard enough on occasion to realize those gains, but you are then probably skiing fast enough and close enough to your own out-of-control line to expose yourself to far more other risk than the Tecton's release advantages mitigate.

The heel DIN adjustment. This is truly a DIN certified binding. What is called "DIN" on some other tech bindings isn't actually a certified number.
The heel DIN adjustment. This is truly a DIN certified binding. What is called "DIN" on some other tech bindings isn't actually a certified number.

Ease of Use


Overall, the Tecton is about average in ease of use. Getting in to the toe pieces is easier than most tech bindings. There are stops to guide you in, and the pins close on a "hair trigger." This is nice once you are accustomed to it. The toe lock lever is easy to actuate and lock mode is clear. The heel elevators work great and are easily adjusted with your ski pole.

There are pros and cons to transitions with the Tecton; this is kind of a theme. First, Fritschi bindings are the only ones we tested that can be switched from ski to tour mode without taking the ski off. This is nice when your ski route goes from steep to flat or gently downhill. Most ski to tour mode transitions requires taking the ski off to put skins on. In those cases where you don't need to put skins on but wish to go to tour mode, the Fritschi Tecton bindings smooth this out more than others.


In more normal transitions, the Tecton isn't anything special. Levering the heel piece to go from ski to tour mode is a bit of a wrestling match, especially at higher release values. Changing between ski and tour mode is easier on the Tecton than it is with the otherwise close competitor Marker KingPin. Each binding has its quirks. The Tecton is relatively easy to use, a testament to the maturation of this entire category of equipment.

The toe lever locks  but not completely. This leaves a margin for safety that few others have. We also found  though  that the additional complication of the Tecton toe piece made for an unfamiliar flex in tour mode.
The toe lever locks, but not completely. This leaves a margin for safety that few others have. We also found, though, that the additional complication of the Tecton toe piece made for an unfamiliar flex in tour mode.

Weight


Across the whole spectrum of bindings we tested, the Tecton is nothing special. It is more than four times the weight of the lightest binding we tested. It is quite a bit lighter than the heaviest frame bindings we have looked at.


It is in weight that the Tecton is most distinguished from the otherwise very close competitor Marker KingPin. At a similar performance, but 100 grams less, the Tecton edges ahead overall because of its weight. The weight penalty you pay for the Tecton and Kingpin is only worth it if you need the enhanced downhill performance. For more "normal" backcountry touring, something like either Editors' Choice winners will cut your binding weight in half with little to no actual disadvantage.

We found the Tecton bindings  with extensive plastic construction and many moving parts  to be more prone to icing up than any other tech binding we've tested. Here  snow has built up to create "nature's heel lifters"; a state that is undesirable for flat Grand Teton Park approaches and exits.
We found the Tecton bindings, with extensive plastic construction and many moving parts, to be more prone to icing up than any other tech binding we've tested. Here, snow has built up to create "nature's heel lifters"; a state that is undesirable for flat Grand Teton Park approaches and exits.

Durability


Our test is ongoing, and we hope to tax the durability of the Tecton. For now, after two full seasons on them, we have had no problems at all. The construction is largely plastic, which gives it the weight advantage over similar offerings from other companies but makes it seem more vulnerable to breakage. We have had no problems with it.


Value


The price of the Tecton is competitive, but nothing special. Provided it holds up in the long term (and we'll keep using and abusing them — we'll keep you posted), you will get your money's worth out of these bindings.

For your normal  reasonable angled powder skiing  the Tecton is overkill. It isn't until you hit Mach 5 that the downhill attributes really "come into their own".
For your normal, reasonable angled powder skiing, the Tecton is overkill. It isn't until you hit Mach 5 that the downhill attributes really "come into their own".

Conclusion


It is our opinion that the Tecton will have the greatest appeal to those new to the backcountry. It is most suited to the truly accomplished, but it will have a broader appeal for other reasons. It simply looks more familiar. Committing to ultralight tech style bindings is intimidating. The Tecton looks more like your alpine bindings, and will, therefore, be appealing. Consider your actual usage patterns and preferences and ski style before committing to carry around the weight of the Tecton. If you really need it, the extra downhill performance of the Tecton is worth it. However, if you don't need that performance bump, something half the weight is going to be way more enjoyable. In overall scoring, the Tecton does pretty well. The downhill performance is by far its best attribute, but it does better on the uphill than some of the older style products we have tested. The Tecton is our Top Pick for big, aggressive skiers touring in the backcountry.


Jediah Porter