The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Teva Omnium 2 Review

This model holds its own, but isn't our favorite closed sandal.
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Price:  $90 List | $89.95 at Amazon
Pros:  Protective coverage, three points of adjustment
Cons:  Not the most comfortable or breathable sandal
Manufacturer:   Teva
By Rob Woodworth ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 15, 2018
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62
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 10
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Traction - 25% 6
  • Stability - 20% 7
  • Adjustability - 15% 5
  • Versatility - 15% 7

The Skinny

While closed-toe sandals aren't popular with everyone, the Teva Omnium 2 has caught the eye of multi-sport adventurers looking for protective, breathable footwear. It is indeed a supportive sandal. However, it didn't hold up to the expectations of our testers. We found them to have only moderate traction and stability and the completely closed toe meant they were slow to dry and hardly felt like sandals.

Compared to our other closed-toe model in this review, the Omnium 2 has more points of adjustment. However, our testing showed that this sandal was less sporty, less comfortable, and more cumbersome to adjust than most others. Try the Keen Newport H2 if you're looking for a high functioning closed-toe sandal at a similar price point.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Teva refers to the Omnium 2 as "wet-dry hybrid shoes"—they utilize the same outsole material as the Teva Terra Fi 4. But our testing proved that this 'hybrid' feels more like a shoe and doesn't play as well in the water as we had hoped.

Performance Comparison


The Teva Omnium feel more like an aquatic shoe than a sandal...not necessarily a bad thing  but we prefer breathability in our summer footwear.
The Teva Omnium feel more like an aquatic shoe than a sandal...not necessarily a bad thing, but we prefer breathability in our summer footwear.

Traction


The Omnium 2 features the proprietary Spider rubber found on most of Tevas active footwear. The outsole has tough black rubber around the foot perimeter with a strip of beige non-skid rubber in the middle. The tread is angular but not fully lugged out.

The mixed rubber sole of the Omnium 2 wasn't exactly our favorite. While the non-skid material is favorable for watersports  we didn't experience the best traction on mixed or loose rock.
The mixed rubber sole of the Omnium 2 wasn't exactly our favorite. While the non-skid material is favorable for watersports, we didn't experience the best traction on mixed or loose rock.

Ultimately, we weren't terribly impressed by this model's traction performance. Though it fared well in favorably dry conditions, we found that the rubber had a tendency to give up once it became wet. This is sort of a deal breaker for a shoe that claims to be a "wet-dry hybrid." The Hurricane XLT 2 and Terra Fi 4, also from Teva, both had better traction than the Omnium 2. Its direct competitor, the Newport H2, offers vastly improved purchase on nearly any terrain.

Comfort


A bonus of closed-toe sandals is their greater coverage and protection that enables more confident bushwhacking, trailblazing, or activities that would otherwise be challenging in sandals. The toe box of the Omnium 2 is certainly protective, though it offers so much coverage that breathability becomes an issue. Similarly, during aqueous adventuring, we found that the shoe was slow to drain and dry thoroughly.

Even though it isn't the most comfortable sandal in the lineup  the Omnium is forgiving enough to be worn during high-intensity outings.
Even though it isn't the most comfortable sandal in the lineup, the Omnium is forgiving enough to be worn during high-intensity outings.

We also aren't wild about how the heel strap of the Omnium rubs against our bare skin. The comprehensive coverage may help protect you from snags, but it also makes it more challenging to get pebbles or sand unstuck from inside. Worn with socks, both of these issues are mitigated, but socks also aren't the best with this swampy toe box.

Stability


Despite being lighter than the Keen Newport H2, the Omnium 2 provides the same amount of overall stability throughout the gauntlet of our testing. While there are stiffer, more robust soles to choose from in this review, our testers thought that the Omnium was capable of handling sporty approaches.

Great protection and support are notable strengths of the Omnium 2. Both of these characteristics helped to boost its stability score.
Great protection and support are notable strengths of the Omnium 2. Both of these characteristics helped to boost its stability score.

Full-coverage sandals may offer more protection, but that doesn't necessarily equate to more security. Because of how the Omnium is shaped, and the relative lack of secure straps or webbing, we found our feet sliding around in this sandal more than we like. For ultra-stable support, check out the Chaco Z/1 Classic.

Adjustability


Compared with the similar Newport H2, this sandal has more total adjustments points. However, our testers preferred the singular elastic loop of the Newport as it was quicker to adjust, easier to release, and hugged the foot better than the Omnium.

While we appreciate three different points of adjustment  they seem superfluous on a sandal that's almost a shoe. We prefer the lace-up style of the Newport among the closed-toe designs.
While we appreciate three different points of adjustment, they seem superfluous on a sandal that's almost a shoe. We prefer the lace-up style of the Newport among the closed-toe designs.

Using a velcro heel strap in the heel, a buckling velcro strap over the instep, and a small loop of elastic laces, the Omnium 2 has all the bells and whistles for dialing in a good fit…or so you'd think. Our experience with these shoes has proven to us that, when it comes to sandals, simplicity is preferred to extravagance.

Versatility


Being that they offer enhanced coverage and protection, the Omnium 2 may seem like a clear choice for those in need of a do-it-all hybrid shoe. While it is certainly capable of handling a good blend of outdoor excursions, we wouldn't recommend it as an all-purpose footwear option.

Enhanced coverage and a protective toe box may lend a hand to more raucous adventuring  but the Omnium 2 isn't the best choice for all terrain types.
Enhanced coverage and a protective toe box may lend a hand to more raucous adventuring, but the Omnium 2 isn't the best choice for all terrain types.

The materials and design of the Omnium aren't conducive to draining water from the footbed or drying quickly after getting wet. This is a huge bummer if you plan to use these as multi-sport shoes where you will undoubtedly be getting wet. Again, for these conditions, we prefer the Keen Newport.

Best Applications


The Omnium 2 is best for backyard BBQ's and perhaps some light-duty hiking. It hasn't quite got the gusto to be considered an all-terrain sandal.

Value


At $90, the Omnium 2 is cheaper than some of the higher-end models included in this review. However, we assert that your money is better spent on a different shoe. If you're looking for affordable performance, take a look at the Teva Hurricane XLT 2.

If you're looking solid water shoe  we think you can do better than the Omnium 2.
If you're looking solid water shoe, we think you can do better than the Omnium 2.

Conclusion


We were ultimately disappointed with the performance of this sandal. With a swampy toe box and faux-leather materials, it's tough even to call it a sandal. While it offers great protection on the trail, there is something left to be desired in the Teva Omnium 2 after our intense testing. If your objective is to find an all-purpose sandal capable of handling missions on water as well as land, you'd be wise to look at the other models in this review first.


Rob Woodworth