Hands-on Gear Review

The North Face Endurus Hike GTX Review

Price:  $140 List | $84.99 at MooseJaw
Pros:  Comfortable, water resistant, breathable
Cons:  Lacking support for rough terrain
Bottom line:  A great shoe that feels better for walking around town or on gentle trails.
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Actual Weight per pair (size 10):  1.62 lbs
Width Options:  Regular
Upper:  Synthetic mesh
Manufacturer:   The North Face

Our Verdict

The North Face Endurus Hike GTX is a very comfortable pair of hiking or walking shoes. They have a softer than normal foam midsole that is also on the thicker side, making them almost as comfortable as the super-thick Hoka One One Tor Summit. They are a little softer than that pair though, and even though they are thick you can still feel sharp rocks underneath your feet. We preferred to wear these on softer trails or when walking around town. In fact, they are a great pair for traveling — they provide all-day comfort for walking around cities and they can also handle a day hike. If you like to travel light and want only one pair of shoes for your next getaway, these would be a good choice. For a more traditional hiking shoe that's built specifically for the trails, check out our Editors' Choice winner, the Oboz Sawtooth BDry.



RELATED REVIEW: The 12 Best Hiking Shoes for Women


Our Analysis and Test Results

Review by:
Cam McKenzie Ring

Last Updated:
Wednesday
May 16, 2018

Share:

The North Face Endurus Hike GTX has an "XtraFoam" midsole that seems like it is TNF's attempt at replicating the Hoka One One phenomenon. It's thicker than most other midsoles, giving you a cushy and soft ride. This shoe also has a Gore-Tex liner and a Vibram XS Trek sole.

Performance Comparison


What are those shoes? We got asked that question a lot in this pair. The Endurus have a distinct look (somewhat similar to the Hoka brand) and provide a lot of comfort.
What are those shoes? We got asked that question a lot in this pair. The Endurus have a distinct look (somewhat similar to the Hoka brand) and provide a lot of comfort.

Comfort


The Endurus received one of our highest scores for comfort. There were many factors that combined to make this a comfortable shoe. The thick midsole is soft and provides a lot of cushioning, and fell somewhere between the Hoka Tor Summit and the Ahnu Sugarpine in terms of softness. The Sugarpine is very soft (to the point of being able to feel every sharp rock), and the Tor Summit is on the firmer side (while still giving you lots of cushioning). We could feel some sharp rocks under the Endurus, but we didn't get the same foot fatigue as we did with the Sugarpine. We also found this to be one of the more breathable models, which helped it to be more comfortable as well. The upper is synthetic and thin, with multiple diamond-shaped cutouts to help increase airflow.

The thick midsoles provided a lot of comfort. We also had good traction on bare rock thanks to the sticky rubber  but it didn't hold quite as well on loose trails.
The thick midsoles provided a lot of comfort. We also had good traction on bare rock thanks to the sticky rubber, but it didn't hold quite as well on loose trails.

Support


We didn't get quite as much support out of this model as we would have liked. In addition to the Xtra-Foam midsole, TNF says that there's a firmer EVA on the outside of the midsole for more stability. We didn't notice much firmness in this pair, and it didn't feel as stable laterally as models with a super-stiff sole like the Lowa Renegade GTX Lo. The arch support built into the shoe did feel adequate, though the insole was just a flat piece of material and did nothing to help provide more support.

The Endurus insole (right) wasn't much to write home about. We really liked the molded  supportive insole found in the Oboz Sawtooth  which costs about the same as the Endurus does.
The Endurus insole (right) wasn't much to write home about. We really liked the molded, supportive insole found in the Oboz Sawtooth, which costs about the same as the Endurus does.

Traction


The Endurus got their lowest score in this category. The thicker midsole made them a little less sensitive on bare rock, though the rubber on this pair did stick pretty well. The lugs were a little shallow when it came to gripping on loose trails though. These are better suited to gentler trails and city walking then a burly mountain adventure.

This sole is more like a running shoe than a trail hiker. We did get good traction on bare rock  but the lugs weren't aggressive enough for steep and loose trails.
This sole is more like a running shoe than a trail hiker. We did get good traction on bare rock, but the lugs weren't aggressive enough for steep and loose trails.

Weight


The Endurus are light! They weigh 1.62 pounds in the woman's size 10 that we tested. They offer a lot more comfort and stability than the next lightest pair (1.56 pound Ahnu Sugarpine WP) and even at the end of a long day on our feet we didn't feel like they were dragging us down.

Water Resistance


We were impressed by the waterproofness of this pair. The Gore-Tex liner really does keep the water out of the inside of this shoe, which is impressive considering how thin the upper is. The tongue gusset comes high up the front and also helped keep the water out. We did notice that the synthetic upper held water in though as opposed to shedding it like the Salomon X Ultra 3, so they might be a bit slower to dry out once wet.

The upper material did get saturated during our tests (right) but never leaked thanks to the Gore-Tex liner and well-gusseted tongue.
The upper material did get saturated during our tests (right) but never leaked thanks to the Gore-Tex liner and well-gusseted tongue.

Durability


Our main concern with the durability of the Endurus is that there is a lot of exposed midsole. Since that material is soft, it'll be more prone to wear than a covered midsole. The lugs on the soles are not very deep either, and since the rubber is soft, you might wear away a lug or two over time.

So much midsole! Soft  exposed midsoles like this one are a prime source of early wear.
So much midsole! Soft, exposed midsoles like this one are a prime source of early wear.

Best Applications


The North Face Endurus Hike GTX is a great shoe for those who like a lot of comfort from their footwear and don't do a lot of aggressive hiking. In fact, these seem like a better walking shoe to us, and they do a great job of cushioning your feet throughout the day. This is the pair we'd take on a weekend getaway where we expected to do a lot of walking around a new city with a short day hike thrown in as well. You could pack just this one pair, and it would handle all of your footwear needs.

Value


The Endurus retail for $140, which is a bit more than the other TNF model that we tested, the Hedgehog Fastpack ($120). The Endurus did score higher than the Hedgehog, so that extra $20 may just be worth it. For a more substantial savings, check out our Best Buy winner, the Merrell Moab 2 Ventilators ($100).

Conclusion


The North Face Endurus Hike GTX is a great pair of shoes that can work well for moderate hiking. This isn't the pair we'd take on a 15-mile day hike over rough terrain or on a backpacking trip, but they worked well on easy terrain and were certainly very comfortable.

Other Versions


The Endurus are also available in a mid-height boot for $150, and in a non-waterproof version, the Endurus TR, for $130.

Cam McKenzie Ring

You Might Also Like

OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: May 16, 2018
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (5.0)
Average Customer Rating:  
 (0.0)
Rating Distribution
1 Total Ratings
5 star: 100%  (1)
4 star: 0%  (0)
3 star: 0%  (0)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)


Have you used this product?
Don't hold back. Share your viewpoint by posting a review with your thoughts...