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Rab Torque Review

The Torque has a well thought out design that appeals to both summer and winter climbers and mountaineers
Rab Torque
Photo: Rab
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Price:  $200 List | $199.95 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Trim fit, abrasion resistant material, harness and helmet friendly
Cons:  Not as wet weather resistant, UK zippers can be awkward to use
Manufacturer:   Rab
By Ryan Huetter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Mar 30, 2020
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73
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#5 of 11
  • Weather Protection - 30% 4
  • Breathability - 30% 9
  • Mobility - 25% 9
  • Weight - 10% 8
  • Versatility - 5% 7

Our Verdict

The Rab Torque is an excellent softshell jacket for climbing and other mountain activities. Designed to be capable in alpine environments, it is a trim-fitting garment that eliminates unnecessary features in favor of functionality. Best used on summertime routes such as the West Ridge of Forbidden Peak or the East Face of Mount Whitney, this jacket excels in rough terrain thanks to its durable fabric in high wear areas like the elbows. It's best when precipitation is unlikely; it breathes very well but does not repel water as well as other models.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Rab Torque
This Product
Rab Torque
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Best Buy Award  
Price $199.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$249.00 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$189.95 at Amazon$81.71 at Backcountry
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$114.95 at Amazon
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Pros Trim fit, abrasion resistant material, harness and helmet friendlyDurable fabric, great fit, all-around usefulnessSoft and stretchy fabric, lightweight, great wind protectionInexpensive, great breathability, stretchyIncredibly light, very mobile
Cons Not as wet weather resistant, UK zippers can be awkward to useLimited water resistance, fitted cuffsHood fit is tightLimited weather protectionLimited weather protection, few features
Bottom Line With a trim fit and intentional features for climbers, mountaineers, and skiers, the Torque is a great climbing layerAn all-around softshell jacket that is at home in the mountains but looks good in town as wellA do-it-all softshell jacket, the ROM is a great choice for those seeking a simple jacket that does well in a range of conditionsWhile not the most weatherproof jacket, this wind resistant softshell allows for ultimate mobility for climbers and adventurers on a budgetThis lightweight jacket pairs well with a baselayer to keep you protected while climbing or hiking
Rating Categories Rab Torque Arc'teryx Gamma LT Hoody Marmot ROM Ferrosi Hooded Rab Borealis
Weather Protection (30%)
4
8
8
3
5
Breathability (30%)
9
8
8
10
8
Mobility (25%)
9
9
8
10
9
Weight (10%)
8
8
7
8
9
Versatility (5%)
7
7
6
4
5
Specs Rab Torque Arc'teryx Gamma LT... Marmot ROM Ferrosi Hooded Rab Borealis
Measured Weight (size medium) 16.5oz 17oz 17oz 13oz 10.5oz
Material Ripstop Matrix stretch double weave Wee Burly (56% nylon, 34% polyester, 10% elastane) GORE Infinium 3L (92% nylon, 8% elastane plain weave) Body/hood: 86% nylon, 14% spandex 90D stretch woven ripstop
Shoulders/lower sleeves: Cordura 91% nylon, 9% spandex 120D stretch woven
Lightweight Matrix single weave with 2-way stretch and DWR
Type Technical Active Active Active Technical
Lined/Insulated? No No No No No
Hood? Yes, helmet compatible with concealed cordlocks Yes, helmet compatible, adjustable StormHood Yes, with Peripheral Cord Adjustment Yes, adjustable Yes, under helmet with lycra binding
Number of Pockets (zippered unless otherwise noted) 2 (external chest) 3 (2 handwarmer, 1 internal) 4 (2 harness-compatible hand, 1 chest, 1 interior) 3 (2 handwarmer, 1 chest) 2 (external chest)
Adjustable Cuffs? Yes, Velcro Stretch cuffs Velcro Elastic cuffs Lycra cuffs
Available Sizes S - XXL XS - XXL S - XXL S - XXL S - XXL

Our Analysis and Test Results

A strong contender, the Rab Torque is often the benchmark that we compare other softshell jackets to during our testing, especially when it comes to performance on rock.

Performance Comparison


The Rab Torque is a great choice for summer mountaineering and other...
The Rab Torque is a great choice for summer mountaineering and other mountain sports.
Photo: Derek Tse

Weather Protection


The Torque uses a lighter weight Matrix DWS material in the body — a stretch woven fabric that is 88 percent nylon and 12 percent spandex with no inner fleece. The material adequately stops wind on its own, though its effectiveness in a cold breeze is boosted with the use of a mid-weight layer worn underneath — no surprise there. The Torque also has a number of seams that provide a trim and tailored fit, though these seams are unsealed and thus make the fabric more vulnerable to moisture. The Matrix material is great for mostly dry conditions where winds and cold precipitation (snow) is expected, but this softshell only held up to 20 seconds of strong precipitation during our shower test before wetting out.

The chink in the Torque's armor: it does not hold up well to wet...
The chink in the Torque's armor: it does not hold up well to wet weather.
Photo: Ryan Huetter

One of the features we really like about this jacket is the wire insert in the brim of the hood, which allows the brim to be molded around a helmet, hat, or head to gain extra weather protection.

Breathability


This jacket is one of the most breathable contenders in our review due to Rab's proprietary Matrix DWS fabric. By forgoing an inner liner, there is less material to soak up moisture that subsequently needs to be pushed through the outer layer. The Torque performs slightly better than some in keeping moisture out, but other fabrics do a better job of water resistance in wet conditions. Although we cherish breathability in our softshell jackets, do consider your environment and climate as well.

This highly breathable jacket keeps you from overheating and getting...
This highly breathable jacket keeps you from overheating and getting wet from perspiration during athletic activity.
Photo: Derek Tse

Mobility


This is another area in which the Torque excels — this shell can move easily with the body in a range of motions. It is barely outmatched by other unlined jackets that use lighter softshell fabric with a stretch weave. Not only is the fabric of the Torque ultra-stretchy, but it is also cut with athletic movement in mind. The cut does run slightly small, however, so if you often find yourself between sizes or wish to wear layers underneath, then consider trying a size up.

The elbows of the Torque are articulated so that they bunch up less when making climbing moves, and the torso is fitted so that there is less unnecessary bulky fabric in the way. While grabbing a climbing hold high above the head or swinging an ice tool, we did not experience any cuff drop, thanks to effective and secure wrist closures. However, the hem is a bit low and can pull up from under a harness while climbing. Users with a longer torso may wish to consider the next size up.

The summit block of Thunderbolt Peak requires lots of mobility (and...
The summit block of Thunderbolt Peak requires lots of mobility (and a good deal of friction). The Torque is well-suited for the task.
Photo: Derek Tse

Weight


This highly capable layer only weighs 16.5 ounces for a medium. The low weight results from the thinner shell material and lack of inner lining. In warmer conditions with less need for base layers or at a lower elevation on the way to the high peaks, this jacket's lighter weight make it much more comfortable than heavier models. Just keep in mind that there is a correlation between weight and weather protection.

Versatility


The Torque is a solid performer in this metric. It is a relatively simple jacket from a first impression, having only chest pockets and no handwarmer pockets, as well as an absence of any interior pockets. The features which the Torque does employ are useful and utilitarian. The helmet-compatible hood has a three-way closure system, complete with hidden cord locks. This is an important improvement in the most current model, and we find them easier to use than past iterations. The wrist closures secure easily with a Velcro cuff, fitting comfortably around or underneath gloves.

The cuffs fit well over light gloves and easily pack underneath...
The cuffs fit well over light gloves and easily pack underneath gauntlet-style gloves if the weather is colder.
Photo: Ryan Huetter

Areas of high wear like the head and elbows are given a Ripstop Matrix fabric, which provides users with more confidence in scuffing their way up corners and chimneys on alpine objectives and a dual hem cords allow for a secure fit around the waist. There are only two pockets on this jacket, among the fewest of any model. This is a simple outer layer, yet we were never left wanting more while wearing it on the trips it's intended for.

The hood closure has a covering, improving the weather protection...
The hood closure has a covering, improving the weather protection and keeping the cord lock from snagging.
Photo: Ryan Huetter

Value


The Torque is on the more expensive side, given that it is unlined and less weather resistant than others. That said, it is a niche garment and does what it is supposed to very well.

Conclusion


If you are looking for a durable, wind-resistant softshell jacket that is at home high on the rocky crags, then the Rab Torque could be the jacket for you. With unlined, stretchy shell fabric, this layer moves with you, making it easier to focus on the demands of your objective.

Lightweight, durable, highly mobile, and with well-thought-out...
Lightweight, durable, highly mobile, and with well-thought-out features, this jacket is at home in the mountains.
Photo: Derek Tse

Ryan Huetter