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Mountainsmith Halite 7075 - Women's Review

Affordable folding aluminum poles that pack small and come with snow and trail accessories, but lack in terms of comfort and adjustability
Mountainsmith Halite 7075 - Women's
Photo: Mountainsmith
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Price:  $80 List | $77.25 at Amazon
Pros:  Packs small, affordable, comes with powder baskets and trail baskets
Cons:  Painful thumb release, unrefined grip comfort, small adjustability range
Manufacturer:   Mountainsmith
By Mary Witlacil ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 25, 2021
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54
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 20% 5
  • Weight - 20% 4
  • Locking and Adjustability - 15% 3
  • Packed Size - 15% 9
  • Durability - 15% 6
  • Versatility - 15% 6

Our Verdict

The Mountainsmith Halite 7075 are an affordable pair of women's specific poles that struggled to hold their own in a field of stiff competition. The cork and EVA grips are too short and slim for comfort, and they don't offer the widest range of adjustability for shorter women. The thumb release mechanism for collapsing the poles is difficult to engage, making it quite challenging to fold them for storage in your pack. That said, these poles do come equipped with rubber tips, as well as trail and snow baskets, so they could be decent for someone looking for affordable poles for day hikes, snowshoeing, or light backpacking.

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Halite are foldable aluminum trekking poles that pack down quite small and come equipped with trail and snow baskets. The grips aren't the most comfortable, and the thumb release mechanism is challenging to use, which makes them difficult to pack down. That said, they are quite affordable and could be a great option for day hikes, light backpacking, and snowshoeing.

Performance Comparison


The Halite 7075 poles are a decent folding option for day hiking or...
The Halite 7075 poles are a decent folding option for day hiking or light backpacking, and they handled well enough to tackle rocky terrain.
Photo: Jared Ross

Comfort


We wanted to love the grips on the Halite 7075 because they're made from natural cork and EVA, but they just didn't provide the comfort of other models. The grips are slimmer and shorter to accommodate smaller hands, but if you have larger hands, these might be too slim and short for comfort. The top of the grip is made of a harder plastic, which made palming on the poles while going downhill somewhat uncomfortable. We appreciate the thin wrist straps, as they worked well enough, and had a barely-there feel. Finally, aluminum poles will never provide as much shock-absorption as carbon fiber poles, though many are designed with thick cork or foam grips to dampen vibration. However, given the folding design of the Halite, we felt both trail vibrations, as well as the vibrations of the poles themselves — which is definitely not very comfortable on long hikes.

The cork and EVA grips are too narrow and short for our taste. The...
The cork and EVA grips are too narrow and short for our taste. The grip design is also uncomfortable to palm and doesn't leave any room to choke down while on steep terrain.
Photo: Mary Witlacil

Weight


At 18.5 ounces without baskets or tips, these poles are the second heaviest poles in our review, so they didn't score well in this metric. That said, they pack down small and easily disappear into a pack, so we weren't overly concerned, especially for shorter journeys.

The Halite 7075 poles were among the heaviest in our review, but we...
The Halite 7075 poles were among the heaviest in our review, but we barely noticed their heft when they were stowed away in our pack.
Photo: Jared Ross

Locking and Adjustability


The Halite 7075 does not offer the same range of adjustment on the lower end of the spectrum that we would expect from a women's specific pole. It has a range from 106 to 125 cm, while other women's poles in our review range from 90 to 125 cm or at least 100 to 125 cm. This means these poles may not be ideal for shorter women.

The lever locking mechanism is quite easy to lock in place and it is easy to tighten the lock with a thumbscrew in the field. However, we found it difficult to engage the release mechanism to fold the poles when we wanted to put them in our pack. This is because the metal thumb release is quite small and is rather painful to press. If you don't plan to move between folding the poles and using them at full extension, then this won't be an issue; but we see this as a sizable drawback to these poles.

Adjusting the length of the Halite 7075 poles is fairly easy with...
Adjusting the length of the Halite 7075 poles is fairly easy with the lever lock. However, engaging the thumb release (the small silver nub to the right of the metal coupling on the right side of the pole) to fold the poles proved challenging and painful.
Photo: Jared Ross

Packed Size


This is one metric where the Halite 7075 truly shines. When folded down to the smallest size, these poles measure a mere 14 inches. However, given the issues we had with engaging the thumb release mechanism, it might be challenging to stow these poles in your pack after you've been using them on the trail.

When fully collapsed, the packed size of the Halite 7075 was among...
When fully collapsed, the packed size of the Halite 7075 was among the shortest in our review.
Photo: Jared Ross

Durability


Aluminum trekking poles are likely to prove more durable than carbon fiber. That said, there is a trade-off between telescoping and foldable poles, where foldable poles are more prone to durability issues. Over the duration of our review, we didn't encounter any glaring durability issues with the Halite 7075. However, they do rattle a bit while in use, which is somewhat unnerving and made us question their durability over the long haul. For most day hikers, this won't be an issue, but we wouldn't recommend relying on these poles on a thru-hike or an expedition.

The Halite 7075 poles rattled a bit while hiking on rock and trail...
The Halite 7075 poles rattled a bit while hiking on rock and trail, but other than that didn't have any durability issues during testing.
Photo: Jared Ross

Versatility


The Halite 7075 come equipped with trail and powder baskets, as well as rubber tips. This means these poles would be great four-season poles if you plan to use them for day-hiking, snowshoeing, light backpacking, or glacial trekking. However, given our concerns about durability, we wouldn't recommend them for backcountry skiing or splitboarding. They also wouldn't be our top pick for alpine running, longer backpacking trips, thru-hiking, or moving between technical and non-technical terrain.

These poles come equipped with trail and snow baskets, in addition...
These poles come equipped with trail and snow baskets, in addition to rubber tips - making them versatile enough to move between summer day hiking, peak bagging, snowshoeing, and glacial trekking.
Photo: Jared Ross

Value


Depending on what you're looking for, the Halite 7075 could be a steal or a disappointment. They are completely adequate trekking poles that pack down quite small, but they score fairly low across all our other metrics. For a human of average female height with smaller hands looking for an inexpensive pair of folding trekking poles for peak bagging, snowshoeing, and light backpacking, these could be a great option.

Conclusion


The Halite 7075 have some great features, but struggle to hold their own in a field of fierce competitors. While the poles pack down small, the release mechanism is quite difficult and painful to engage. The grips are made of cork but are a bit slim and short for our taste. Finally, if you are shorter than 5'5" these poles may not adjust short enough for you. All that said, they are a reasonably priced pair of poles that come with trail and snow baskets, and would be a great first pair for someone who wants to day hike, snowshoe, or take weekend backpacking trips.

The Halite 7075 moved well on- and off-trail, but failed to wow us...
The Halite 7075 moved well on- and off-trail, but failed to wow us in a field of stiff competition. They could be a great budget option for day hiking, mountain climbing, or snowshoeing, but there are more comfortable, lighter-weight, and easier-to-adjust options out there if you're able to spend a little more money.
Photo: Jared Ross

Mary Witlacil