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Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0 Review

This is a truly supreme sleeping bag only bested by ultra high end manufacturers
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Price:  $620 List | $433.97 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  One of the warmest bags in the test, excellent color scheme
Cons:  Lack of hydrophobic down, missing top hood cinch
Manufacturer:   Mountain Hardwear
By Jeff Rogers ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 18, 2020
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79
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 15
  • Warmth - 20% 9
  • Weight - 20% 9
  • Comfort - 20% 6
  • Packed Size - 15% 8
  • Features - 10% 8
  • Weather Resistance - 15% 7

Our Verdict

The Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0 is an excellent choice for any serious mountaineer or winter camper. It is made of high-end materials and delivers warmth that surpasses the 0F mark, all while staying in a very light and compact package. Mountain Hardwear makes two versions of this bag, the gore-tex Windstopper version, and the Pertex version. We tested the Pertex version. Mountain Hardwear also got rid of the hydrophobic down that was in the older version of these bags. Despite this, it still ranks as one of the best 0F bags on the market today in its price range.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Mountain Hardwear is one of the premier manufacturers of outdoor equipment for athletes pushing the limits of what's possible. Their gear has been to the top of the world and to the ends of the earth on a variety of expeditions. Represented here is their flagship 0F sleeping bag, the Phantom 0. It is a bag designed for frequent trips to the alpine, where weight and warmth are crucial to success, and the cut of the bag maximizes this philosophy of use as much as possible while remaining a fully protective and warm sleeping bag. Read below to find out more about what makes this bag one of the best.

Performance Comparison


One of the best bags in the test  the Phantom 0F.
One of the best bags in the test, the Phantom 0F.

Warmth


The Phantom 0 is filled with 30oz of 850 fill down. This model is the Pertex quantum shell version and not the Goretex Windstopper version. However, when our testers used this bag on a windy summit bivy, they found that the Pertex fabric was plenty windproof and water-resistant while coming in at a lower weight. What this means is that the bag was plenty warm down to 0F and the lack of the gore-tex windproof membrane didn't seem to have much detriment on performance. Each tester felt this bag was warm! Being a warm sleeper and wearing a down parka, you could probably push this sleeping bag past its 0F rating.

Weight


2lbs 10oz is an excellent weight for a true 0F bag. Anything in a sub 3lb package will rank near the top of our scores, the difference in weight is usually found in the amount of down fill in this kind of class. All of the higher-end bags use excellent face fabric and trim weight where they can, both in size of the bag, size of the zipper, amount of stretch cord and toggles, etc. Considering this bag does a great job of allowing you to sleep at 0F, it ranks very high on our weight rating metric.

Comfort


Some users may feel as though the bag is too tight. However, it fit all of our testers who tend to be on the taller and lankier build well. Our lead tester who has a much wider chest, still fit well and slept quite warm, an advantage to having a tight cut for the bag. As far as the hood and its cinch design goes, we noticed a lack of an upper cinch cord, which made it more difficult to fully seal up the bag. The saving grace for this was the impressive neck baffle. Even though a little air was able to get in around our head (which is almost always in a wool beanie) it was unable to get past our insulated necks. With a slightly tighter fit than most 0F bags, we recommend you head over to a shop and lay in this bag before you buy it.

Testers Alex Calder and Tod Reardon enjoy the warmth of their sleeping bags (Western Mountaineering Kodiak MF and Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F) as the sun rises.
Testers Alex Calder and Tod Reardon enjoy the warmth of their sleeping bags (Western Mountaineering Kodiak MF and Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F) as the sun rises.

Packed Size


Another excellent score for the Phantom. Again, Mountain Hardwear includes an excellent compression stuff sack. This is a real value to the customer as with any winter down bag, the key to maximizing packability is a high-end compression sack. As far as sleeping bags go, this is about as close as you can get to the smallest packing true 0F sleeping bag.

The Phantom 0F in its included compression sack. Note that a lot of sleeping bags do not come with a compression sack. We feel a compression sack is a must if you intend to compress your big down sleeping bag into its smallest form factor.
The Phantom 0F in its included compression sack. Note that a lot of sleeping bags do not come with a compression sack. We feel a compression sack is a must if you intend to compress your big down sleeping bag into its smallest form factor.

Features


An insulated small pocket is found on this bag that will allow the storage of small items like ear pods or a granola bar. The bag also has an excellent hood and draft collar, with the only downside being the lack of an upper drawcord. We found this odd as the previous year model had both. It's likely an attempt to save weight. We found that the hood worked fine despite the lack of this cinch, and was likely due to a more contoured cut of the baffles by Mountain Hardwear.

Weather Resistance


The Phantom did quite well in our weather testing despite having the lighter of the two face fabrics available and no water-resistant down. We think removing the water-resistant down this year was a misstep by Mountain Hardwear, and could make this bag really shine on a single night open bivouac. Despite this, we were able to sleep comfortably outside and brush off the frost that accumulated on the top of the bag from our body heat/moisture.

The Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F catches its first light of the day to thaw out from a frozen night. Note the shaping of the baffles. Mountain Hardwear opted for vertical baffles over the chest to reduce downshifting in our most mobile part of the body during a night's sleep. The foot box  draft collar  and hood are also of excellent quality and very lofty. It's a shame it is no longer filled with Hydrophobic down.
The Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F catches its first light of the day to thaw out from a frozen night. Note the shaping of the baffles. Mountain Hardwear opted for vertical baffles over the chest to reduce downshifting in our most mobile part of the body during a night's sleep. The foot box, draft collar, and hood are also of excellent quality and very lofty. It's a shame it is no longer filled with Hydrophobic down.

Value


We think this is a great value for a high-end winter bag that will see a lot of overnights in the alpine. If you are an occasional winter camper, this bag may be a little overkill. If you see yourself sleeping out on a variety of climbs, ski tours, and cold weather excursions, the high-end materials and construction make sense to spend the money on. After all, this option shaves over a pound off your back versus budget competitors.

Conclusion


The Phantom 0 is an extremely warm, snug-fitting, light, and weather-resistant down bag that packs down small. Without water-resistant down and an upper head cinch, this bag comes close to perfect but just barely misses the mark. You can't go wrong with the Phantom 0 if you fit in this bag comfortably.

Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F in its included storage sack
Mountain Hardwear Phantom 0F in its included storage sack


Jeff Rogers