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Primus Kinjia Review

Slim and sleek, this stove is small but beautifully built and it simmers like a dream.
Primus Kinjia
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Price:  $190 List | Check Price at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Compact, flexible fuel hose, easy to clean, excellent simmer
Cons:  No windscreen, fuel stand is separate and could get lost, attachment for fuel hose is flimsy
Manufacturer:   Primus
By Penney Garrett ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 4, 2019
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61
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 14
  • Time to Boil - 25% 5
  • Wind Resistance - 25% 4
  • Simmering Ability - 20% 7
  • Ease of Set Up - 10% 8
  • Ease of Care - 10% 8
  • Portability - 10% 8

Our Verdict

The Primus Kinjia is a sleek and sexy stove with an easy setup and excellent simmering ability. It has no windscreen and only two-inch-wide burners, the smallest of any stove we tested, but these apparent shortcomings do not overly hinder its performance. The compact design makes boiling water, even when it's windy, decently efficient. This isn't the best stove if you regularly cook with large groups of people or with very large cookware, but for the right situation, it's a stylish and well-performing stove that's really pleasant to use.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Primus Kinjia
This Product
Primus Kinjia
Awards  Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award 
Price Check Price at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$148 List
Check Price at Amazon
$124.95 at REI
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$134.95 at REI
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$99.99 at Amazon
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Pros Compact, flexible fuel hose, easy to clean, excellent simmerDurable, wind-resistant, powerful, even cooking, auto-ignitionEfficient, durable, compact, has auto-ignitionNon-slip rubber feet for leveling, large cooking surface, durable metal latches instead of plasticGreat simmering ability, freestanding, legs are removable, powerful burners, tons of cooking space
Cons No windscreen, fuel stand is separate and could get lost, attachment for fuel hose is flimsyPlastic latches on frontCooks hot, ignitor is sometimes finickyStruggles with the wind, not super powerful, on the heavy sideNo auto ignition system, does not operate on 16oz propane canisters, wind puts out burner easily
Bottom Line Slim and sleek, this stove is small but beautifully built and it simmers like a dream.This has been an Editors' Choice for more than six years.This compact and well-functioning stove boil quickly, is easy to care for, and won't break the bank.This stove is pretty standard, but does provide a large cooking surface and useful non-slip rubber feet for keeping it level, no matter where your camp kitchen ends up.With high BTUs, a large cooking area, and removable legs, this freestanding stove offers a lot of options for big groups and chef-minded camp cooks.
Rating Categories Primus Kinjia Camp Chef Everest GSI Outdoors Selkirk 540 Eureka Ignite Plus Camp Chef Explorer 2-Burner
Time To Boil (25%)
10
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5
10
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10
10
0
8
10
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7
10
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8
Wind Resistance (25%)
10
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4
10
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9
10
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7
10
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6
10
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5
Simmering Ability (20%)
10
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7
10
0
8
10
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6
10
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7
10
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8
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
10
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8
10
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7
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7
10
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7
10
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5
Ease Of Care (10%)
10
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8
10
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7
10
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8
10
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8
10
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9
Portability (10%)
10
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8
10
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6
10
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7
10
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6
10
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3
Specs Primus Kinjia Camp Chef Everest GSI Outdoors... Eureka Ignite Plus Camp Chef Explorer...
Weight (pounds) 8.1 lbs 12.3 lbs 9.8 lbs 12.0 lbs 30.6 lbs (19.2 lbs without legs)
Total BTU (from manufacturer) 14,000 40,000 20,000 20,000 60,000
Boil Time (1 quart of water, wind from a box fan) 8.5 min 3 min 5.5 min 6.25 min 5 min
Boil Time (1 quart of water, no wind) 4.25 min 2.5 min 4 min 4.75 min 3.75 min
Cooktop material Painted steel Nickel-coated steel Nickel-chrome steel Plated steel Cast aluminum
Packed Size (inches) 18.5" x 11.75" x 3.5" 23.5" x 13.5" x 4" 21.4" x 12.9" x 3.8" 23" x 12.8" x 4" 32.75" x 14" x 7.75" (height not including legs)
Cooking surface dimensions (inches) 17.25" x 6" 19" x 9.5" 17.5" x 9.5" 20.5" x 9.5" 32.5" x 13.75"
Burner/flame diameter 2" 3.5" 3" 3" 5"
Distance between burners (center to center) 9" 12" 11" 12" 13"
Windscreen? No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Piezo Ignitor? No Yes Yes Yes No
Number of burners 2 2 2 2 2
Type of Model Tabletop Tabletop Tabletop, foldable Tabletop, foldable Freestanding
Fuel Type Propane Propane Propane Propane Propane - large 20# tank
Mfr. Model Number P-350111 MS2HP 56012 2572195 EX60LW

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Primus Kinjia is well-built and makes it easy to cook your camp meals in style. While not the burliest or most powerful model, if your camp kitchen needs are simple and moderately sized, this is a great, if pricey, stove to consider.

Performance Comparison


Despite small burners and relatively low BTUs  the Kinjia performed quite well across all our rating metrics.
Despite small burners and relatively low BTUs, the Kinjia performed quite well across all our rating metrics.

Time to Boil


The Kinjia does okay boiling water despite having small burners and lower BTUs. It boiled a quart of water in 4:15 with little-to-no wind present. There are better times in our review, but the fact that the Kinjia's 2" burners were able to do this well is a testament to good design and execution.

Despite the low BTUs and tiny burners  this stove still performed well across the board.
Despite the low BTUs and tiny burners, this stove still performed well across the board.

Wind Resistance


No surprise, this isn't the best stove for wind resistance. With only 7,000 BTUs per burner and no windscreen, the Kinjia struggles here the most. That said, it still performs decently due to its compact design. For our box fan test, where we set up a large fan 24 inches to the side of each stove and then timed boiling a quart of water, this model landed right about in the middle with a time of 8:30. What's interesting is that it fared better than other models with windscreens and more power. Design can compensate for BTUs, as this example shows us.

This stove was one of the top winners for packed size  but it still accommodates full size cookware.
This stove was one of the top winners for packed size, but it still accommodates full size cookware.

Simmering Ability


The Kinjia has very user-friendly knobs, and it simmers with ease. The flame is hard to see when it's turned down low, but the ability to fine-tune and feel confident with accurate flame control is excellent. The small two-inch burners do create a bit of a hot spot in the center of cookware, particularly with thinner pans, but for most meals, this isn't a problem. You will need to keep a lighter handy for this stove, as it does not have an auto-ignition system.

This stove has a unique fuel setup with a flexible hose and a separate fuel canister stand to keep it at the correct angle.
This stove has a unique fuel setup with a flexible hose and a separate fuel canister stand to keep it at the correct angle.

Ease of Set Up


This is one of the easier stoves to set up of all the models we tested. Its sturdy wooden handle simply rotates up, allowing the lid to unlock and be opened. Fuel setup is a breeze, with a flexible fuel line already attached to the body of the stove, and which stows neatly on the underside. The stove comes with a special stand to set the neck of your fuel canister on to keep it at the proper angle. This design allows you much more flexibility in regards to where you place your fuel bottle. While we like this setup, we do have a few minor concerns.

First, the head of the fuel adaptor fits into a small recess and is held in place with a thin elastic band. We didn't have any problems with this in the time we used the stove, but it seems very likely that this band could break after extended and continued use. This will leave the fuel line just hanging off the stove with no way to hold it in place. Second, the stand for the fuel bottle is a separate piece that can easily get lost, leaving you with no good way to keep your fuel bottle at the proper 45-degree angle. And last, the lid on our particular model stuck easily and was quite hard to pry open. This is possibly an anomaly of the one stove we used and something that will likely loosen up over time. None of these were major issues, and if you take good care of your stove, we think you will be fine — these are just differences from a more traditional design model that we thought worth mentioning.

We liked the storage area for the fuel hose on this stove  but the thin rubber band holding it in place seems very likely to break.
We liked the storage area for the fuel hose on this stove, but the thin rubber band holding it in place seems very likely to break.

Ease of Care


The Kinjia is one of the easiest stoves in our test suite to clean. The grate lifts off, and the drip tray underneath can also be removed entirely. This is one of the only stoves we tested with a removable drip tray, meaning that no matter how much spaghetti sauce you boil over or how many food bits get dropped below the burner, you will always be able to return the stove to a brand new sparkly clean.

Portability


The Kinjia is one of our top picks for packed size with measurements of 18.5 x 11.75 x 3.5 inches. It has a thin and sleek design that's both attractive and functional, and we love the incorporated handle for carrying. A fair question to ask yourself, though, is how important it is to save a little bit of space when you're car camping? Is five inches more space in the back of your car worth the sacrifice of not being able to use two large skillets? Only you can answer that question for yourself. A 10-inch skillet on one burner of this stove leaves the other side feeling quite constricted. Our testers were pretty unanimous in feeling that the extra 3-5 inches of width on many of the other compact models we tested is worth it when you consider how much more power, space, and versatility you get.

The Kinjia has a nice handle that doubles as the locking lever for the lid of the stove.
The Kinjia has a nice handle that doubles as the locking lever for the lid of the stove.

Value


This stove is pricey and best suited for someone who values looks as much as functionality. No doubt about it, it's a sexy stove. It's light, compact, and beautiful to look at, but is that worth extra money to you? Other models in our review are cheaper and yet have more power, windscreens, a wider cooking area, and bigger burners. Value is subjective, so there's no shame if this stove is worth the extra money to you, and we think it might be a wonderful gift for a stylish new camper. But for your more serious eaters and anyone on a budget, it probably doesn't make sense.

Conclusion


The Kinjia is a compact and well-designed stove that sets up and packs down easily and simmers like a dream. For the right situations, it's a lovely stove. Even though it has small burners, no windscreen, and only 14,000 total BTUs, it boils pretty efficiently. It's a smart, solid design. But it's quite expensive and doesn't offer the power or space of many of the other compact two-burners we tested.

The cooking grate on this stove is a bit slippery but also quite sturdy.
The cooking grate on this stove is a bit slippery but also quite sturdy.


Penney Garrett