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Camp Chef Teton Two-Burner Review

The Teton isn't the fanciest or most powerful stove, but it's a decent option at a very approachable price.
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Price:  $88 List | $69.99 at Amazon
Pros:  Decent wind resistance, auto-ignition, lightweight, compact
Cons:  Unreliable auto-igniter, doesn't simmer as well as other models, cheap front latch
Manufacturer:   Camp Chef
By Penney Garrett ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  May 3, 2018
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63
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 14
  • Time to Boil - 30% 7
  • Wind Resistance - 25% 6
  • Simmering Ability - 15% 4
  • Ease of Set Up - 10% 7
  • Ease of Care - 10% 7
  • Portability - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The Camp Chef Teton doesn't wow us in any particular way, but it gives an acceptable performance across all our rating criteria. It boils just fine, blocks the wind adequately, and set up and cleaning is a cinch. It's also nice and compact and weighs a few pounds less than our Editors' Choice winner, the Camp Chef Everest. It is pretty similar to the Everest, just not quite as good and with half the BTUs. It's also significantly cheaper, and a few things make that clear. Construction and materials aren't as robust or durable, and the auto-ignition system on the Teton is finicky. Some days it worked fine, other days not hardly at all.

All in all, if you are the kind of camper that only needs a stove a handful of times throughout the season, then this is a fine option that will get the job done. However, in the same price range is the Best Buy-winning Coleman Classic. They both perform on a similar level, but the Coleman model is better at simmering, and is, therefore, more versatile.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Best Buy Award 
Price $69.99 at Amazon$172 List
Check Price at Amazon
$239.95 at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
$150 List$43.88 at Amazon
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Pros Decent wind resistance, auto-ignition, lightweight, compactDurable, wind-resistant, powerful, even cooking, auto-ignitionLow profile, lightweight, auto-ignition levers are easy to use, handy carrying caseGood wind resistance, easy to clean, ability to attach another stove or JetBoil, sturdyAffordable, fuel adaptor threads on easier than other stoves, windscreens are adjustable, compact dimensions
Cons Unreliable auto-igniter, doesn't simmer as well as other models, cheap front latchNoneVery pricey, not the most wind resistant, rubber closure straps could breakExpensive, small burners, low BTUs, carry handle is shallow and uncomfortableNo auto-ignition, lower BTUs, small burners prone to hot spots
Bottom Line The Teton isn't the fanciest or most powerful stove, but it's a decent option at a very approachable price.This has been an Editors' Choice for more than five years.Excellent performance meets compact design with this impressive model, a folding two-burner that is hard not to love.A competent stove on its own, this contender will also allow you to connect a JetBoil or other Eureka stoves and run it all off the same fuel source.The Classic is a simple and straightforward two-burner that provides everything you need for basic meals at a very nice price.
Rating Categories Camp Chef Teton Two-Burner Camp Chef Everest Jetboil Genesis Basecamp Eureka Spire LX Coleman Classic
Time To Boil (30%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Wind Resistance (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
6
Simmering Ability (15%)
10
0
4
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
6
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Ease Of Care (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
Portability (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
10
10
0
6
10
0
7
Specs Camp Chef Teton... Camp Chef Everest Jetboil Genesis... Eureka Spire LX Coleman Classic
Weight (pounds) 9.6 lbs 12.3 lbs 7.4 lbs w/bag, 6.4 lbs stove alone 12.4 lbs 9.8 lbs
Total BTU (from manufacturer) 20,000 40,000 20,000 20,000 20,000
Number of burners 2 2 2 2 2
Type of Model Tabletop Tabletop Tabletop, foldable Tabletop Tabletop
Cooktop material Stainless steel Nickel-coated steel Nickel-plated steel Chrome plated steel Aluminized steel
Mfr. Model Number CCF0025 MS2HP GNST 20393 2000020943NP
Packed Size (inches) 21.5 x 12.5 x 4" 23.5 x 13.5 x 4" 9.75 x 4.5" (11 x 6" in carrying bag) 21.5 x 13.1 x 4.2" 21 x 13 x 3.5"
Cooking surface dimensions (inches) 17.5 x 9.25" 19 x 9.5" 8" x 8.5" (each burner) 18 x 9.5" 18.75 x 10.5"
Burner/flame diameter 3.25" 3.5" 3.5" 3" 3.5"
Distance between burners (center to center) 7.75" 12" 10.5" 11" 7.75"
Boil Time (1 quart of 60F water, no wind) 4.75 min 2.5 min 4.5 min 4 min 4.75 min
Boil Time (wind/box fan test) 6.25 min 3 min 7.5 min 5.25 min 6.25 min
Fuel Type Propane Propane Propane Propane Propane
Piezo Ignitor? Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Windscreen? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Teton is the slightly under-achieving younger sibling of the Camp Chef Everest. It's perfectly adequate and gets the job done, but it doesn't have an ivy-league resume either. If money is tight and you don't camp super often, the Teton is fine — but if you can spend a bit more, camp a lot, and want the best? Go with the Everest.

Performance Comparison


The Teton was the cheapest two-burner in our review. It performed decently all around  but also wasn't a showstopper.
The Teton was the cheapest two-burner in our review. It performed decently all around, but also wasn't a showstopper.

Time to Boil


The Teton boiled a quart of 50-degree water in 5 minutes and slightly warmer water in 4:50. This is a decent time but isn't particularly fast. The Editors' Choice Everest completed the same task in 3.5 minutes on a cold day and just 2.5 minutes with warmer 60-degree water. But the Everest also has twice as many BTUs per burner (20,000 as opposed to the Teton's 10,000), so this isn't a big surprise. If you tend to boil tons of water and want it done fast, this stove may be a good one to pair with a JetBoil.

This stove boiled water in a decent time  but it certainly wasn't the fastest in our test suite.
This stove boiled water in a decent time, but it certainly wasn't the fastest in our test suite.

Wind Resistance


The wind resistance on this stove is satisfactory overall. Some of our other models struggled mightily in this category, especially those lacking a windscreen. This makes for a large difference in boiling time when wind is present compared to when it's not. But the compact design of the Teton meant that, wind or not, it stayed fairly consistent. In our box fan test where we put a fan two feet to the side of the stove and turned it on low while boiling water, this stove clocked in at 6:15 — not that much more time than without the fan. And while this isn't a winning time by any means (the Everest finished in 3 minutes and our Top Pick for Group Cooking, the Camp Chef Pro 60X in 4 minutes), it's still a better time than more than half of our test suite. The Teton also does well when cooking food in real (not simulated) wind — the ultimate test of a well-designed stove.

The compact design and protective windscreen of the Teton made for good wind resistance.
The compact design and protective windscreen of the Teton made for good wind resistance.

Simmering Ability


Simmering isn't a strong point for this contender. Despite having the burner as low as it would go, when making pancakes it was difficult to get the center cooked before the outside was done. Our pancakes were definitely edible, but the middle was slightly underdone and the outsides slightly over. We had to observe our veggies and bacon and stir them frequently to not char and over-crisp. If you need something simple and cheap for making soup and pasta, however, this is a fine option. Not everyone needs a gourmet set up. For virtually the same price, though, the Coleman Classic out-simmers the Teton by a large margin.

This stove struggled a bit with getting low enough to properly caramelize onions and slow cook bacon.
This stove struggled a bit with getting low enough to properly caramelize onions and slow cook bacon.

Ease of Set Up


Setting up the Teton is as smooth and straightforward as any other compact two-burner. Slot the windscreens into the lid, attach the fuel adaptor to the stove body, and screw in your fuel canister. Done.

One thing of note, however: while this model does come equipped with an auto-ignition system, ours only worked about half the time. Our first day out of the box it didn't work at all. Later on, it worked here and there, other times it was 100%. It almost behaved as if it needed to be broken in. Maybe it was just an issue with the particular model we tested. Either way, we recommend keeping a lighter handy, just in case.

Clip in the windscreens and attach your fuel canister and you're ready to go!
Clip in the windscreens and attach your fuel canister and you're ready to go!

Ease of Care


Same as set up, caring for this stove is a breeze. The top cooking grate lifts off, clearing the way for you to scrub the drip tray underneath. Simple as that!

Lift off the grate and scrub to shiny perfection!
Lift off the grate and scrub to shiny perfection!

Portability


This is a great option for anyone needing to be conscious of space and weight. It's a nice compact size at 21.5 x 12.5 x 4 inches, and only weighs 9.6 pounds, 2.5 pounds lighter than the Everest. However, if the nuances of fine cooking are more important to you than saving 2 pounds and 2 inches, you might just want to upgrade to the Everest or have a peek at our Top Pick for Portability, the Jetboil Genesis Basecamp which weighs just 7.4 pounds including its carrying bag and has considerably smaller dimensions.

The Teton is a nice option for those needing lightweight and low profile.
The Teton is a nice option for those needing lightweight and low profile.

Best Applications


The Teton is best suited for the budget camper that needs to be able to cook a good meal but isn't super picky or hard on their gear. If you're a once-a-month (or less frequent) camper that mostly enjoys simple meals of canned soup and boxed macaroni and cheese with 2-3 friends, this model saves you significant dough. But, if you want to be able to simmer like a pro and boil super fast, there are better, albeit pricier, choices. And, if you plan to cook for large groups regularly, we recommend taking a gander at the Pro 60X or Explorer 2-Burner.

This is a great stove for simple low impact use. It'll do what a stove is meant to do  simply and fairly efficiently. Just make sure you bring a lighter  as the auto-ignition system only worked about half the time for us.
This is a great stove for simple low impact use. It'll do what a stove is meant to do, simply and fairly efficiently. Just make sure you bring a lighter, as the auto-ignition system only worked about half the time for us.

Value


While there are some performance issues with this stove, the price is still decent for what you get. If you're not someone who camps often, it makes sense to get something simple and affordable. However, the Coleman Classic performs a smidge better across the board and is frequently found online at a steep discount.

While not the best  the Teton is a perfectly fine stove at a very approachable price. It doesn't pack the power or durability of other models in our review  but it got the job done.
While not the best, the Teton is a perfectly fine stove at a very approachable price. It doesn't pack the power or durability of other models in our review, but it got the job done.

Conclusion


We are lukewarm about the Teton overall. It's adequate and available at a nice price, but it didn't blow us out of the water and is of noticeably lower quality than the Camp Chef Everest. It offers good wind resistance and decent boiling times, but it doesn't simmer overly well and we fear it may not withstand the test of time if you are someone that camps often and cooks fiercely.


Penney Garrett