The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Kask Infinity Review

An extremely unique helmet that matches its flash with slippery performance.
Kask Infinity
Top Pick Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $370 List | $219.17 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Aero design, adjustable ventilation and aero vent, stylish, well-cushioned
Cons:  Heavy, warmer in summer months
Manufacturer:   Kask
By Ryan Baham ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 29, 2018
  • Share this article:
78
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#2 of 18
  • Comfort - 20% 10
  • Adjustability - 15% 9
  • Weight - 15% 3
  • Style - 15% 9
  • Ventilation - 20% 8
  • Durability - 15% 7

The Skinny

The Kask Infinity is definitely one of the coolest helmets we've tested and it has the added virtue of being extremely comfortable. Its great design and build earned it the Top Pick for Aero award. It uses abundant padding to keep the hard surfaces from making contact with your dome while its unique ventilation system cools your head should you choose to open the front slat. It's true that it is most comfortable in the three non-summer seasons when you need the extra insulation, but the front grill and side vents do an excellent job of pulling out heat when open.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


The Infinity was one of the best road bike helmets in the lineup and certainly one of our favorites for most riding conditions.

Comfort


Perhaps our very favorite thing about the Kask Infinity is its excellent padding coverage and snug fit. They use 3D DRY padding, a multi-layer open cell material that Kask says improves comfort and performance, and we assume they also claim it improves moisture removal. It seemed to do well with moisture removal, but the catch is that it's also a warmish helmet, so that offsets it a bit. In any case, the padding feels great and the Octo Fit floating cradle ensures a snug fit. Keep in mind that to get your dome into this thing, you need to loosen the Octo Fit dial and then tighten it back down to fit your geometry.


It scores at the very top of the measure next to the somewhat different, but equally comfortable Giro Synthe MIPS, which picked up our Editors' Choice award. The biggest difference is that the Synthe uses less padding and offers a more personalized fit with its MIPS and floating Roc Loc® Air adjustment system to hug the head. The Kask uses much more padding to offer more cushion and a good fit. If you like cushion, we think you'll be happy with the Kask. If you want a lighter helmet with a closer fit, we think you'll appreciate the Synthe.

The Kask Infinity is a super comfortable helmet with fair aeration  but long  slow  hot summer slogs up the side of mountains can be a little warm.
The Kask Infinity is a super comfortable helmet with fair aeration, but long, slow, hot summer slogs up the side of mountains can be a little warm.

Adjustability


The Octo Fit floating cradle does exactly what the name suggests: cradle the head. That allows it to be adjusted using the two-way Micro Dial in the rear to adjust to the shape of your head and give a better fit. It's fairly friendly on the road, though getting your fingers around the dial can be a bit less convenient than in some of the other models because its upper edge sits behind the EPS lining.

It uses the fixed Y-straps and the ECO chinstrap, moving adjustment to the center of the chin instead of the adjustable Y-straps where most helmets are typically adjusted. Thankfully that keeps us from having to do the dance of figuring out which side is longer and fussing with pulling strap through the back of the helmet and reassessing, then adjusting a bit more - you only have to worry about the center segment.


It sits up at the top of the list alongside a few of the other easily adjustable offerings in the group. We think most riders would be very happy with the Infinity, but there are other options out there. Most of the other top competitors use adjustable Y-straps and easily accessible two-way dials at the back of the helmet. For those looking for a more affordable, introductory helmet, consider the Bell Overdrive MIPS. For those who still want a premium helmet with solid performance, chip on over to the Bell Gage MIPS and check it out.

The fixed ECO chinstrap allows adjustment to shift from a confounding balancing game to a simple pull. The Octo Fit floating cradle and Micro Dial help secure the helmet and offer excellent adjustability.
The fixed ECO chinstrap allows adjustment to shift from a confounding balancing game to a simple pull. The Octo Fit floating cradle and Micro Dial help secure the helmet and offer excellent adjustability.

Durability


Kask asserts that it can improve shock absorption, and by extension likely improve the life of the helmet, using its In-Molding system. That system consists of a polycarbonate shell molded onto the polystyrene foam. A few low-force swats to the sides of the helmet didn't yield too much objective or measurable data, but we didn't notice much difference between this construction and that of other helmets, but we don't have access to the sort of machines that measure force and impact available to most helmet manufacturers. However, it could be reasonably judged that the Inner Frame improves strength and resiliency, helping to keep the framing in place under stress the way steel rebar fortifies concrete support beams.


We expect this lid to last a good while, but we'd be remiss if we didn't point out that thin moving parts like the sliding vent are inherently less durable than normal solid structures. That being said, we couldn't find any reports of degradations, breakdowns, or mechanical failures of any sort. However, if you're looking for a super durable tank, there are a few other options you might consider. Its top-scoring cousin, the Kask Protone uses similar materials and design, but has a full covering, whereas the Infinity has a large open space across the center to improve ventilation. The other top helmet is the Smith Overtake, which uses carbon fiber reinforcement and protective inner layers like Koroyd®️. These are great options, but it's going to be hard to touch the Infinity on comfort, aero performance, and coolness factor. If it's a toss-up for durability, we think the Overtake would be the better choice, but take a look at all three.

While the protective polycarbon layer and robust build help this helmet last longer  the moving vent might be a point of concern  though we couldn't find any reports to that effect.
While the protective polycarbon layer and robust build help this helmet last longer, the moving vent might be a point of concern, though we couldn't find any reports to that effect.

Style


So, here's the thing, as much as we loved this helmet and even think it looks cool, it's undeniable that some of the color styles give that mushroomy Toad look from MarioTM. We still think it has a sleek, cool, aero look, despite the hurtful criticisms hairy-legged non-riders foist upon us. If, like us, you are into the Death Star gunner helmet look, you're in luck because they come in all black - and nine other colors and configurations, though mostly limited to black, white, light blue, and red.


As we say in each of the other reviews, this measure is the most subjective of the categories, so be sure to look around the field and check out the options for each product because your views might not be consistent with ours. If this just isn't your jam, there are many other choices. The Best Buy Catlike KOMPACT'O is one of the most unique designs in the lineup and very much worth a look. If you're into more traditional designs, give the Giro Synthe a gander. If you're interested in a more aggressive, angular look (think: updated Knight Rider meets full budget version of updated Independence Day), you might like the Smith Overtake (we're describing the black and green version).

Judge for yourself  but we honestly think this is a cool-looking helmet.
Judge for yourself, but we honestly think this is a cool-looking helmet.

Ventilation


It has a pretty unique design that really impacts how the ventilation performs. When the vent door is open, there are 13 apparent vents that allow air to flow through and cool the head - and it flows really well. There are three large vents in the front that can be exposed or covered by the door and two smaller vents along the lower rim at each side that aren't covered by the door, so even when the door is open, those vents are drawing in a bit of breeze. There are 8 deep vents at the rear to maintain circulation without compromising aerodynamic performance.

The really unique ventilation aspect here is that under the sliding vent door is a large gap that spans much of the center portion of the helmet, allowing a great deal of air to circulate across the top of the head. In order to ensure that happens, the vent must be open. That means, in turn, that a closed vent door is a warmer helmet, making it ideal for warm weather and not especially pleasant when closed on long, hot rides.


If you do most of your riding out in hot conditions or just need more ventilation in your headgear, we have some alternates for you. The Catlike KOMPACT'O looks like cholla wood made out of carbon fiber. It uses a good deal of large vents to pull air in across the head and directs it out, without using too much thick, insulating padding. The Specialized Airnet MIPS tops out measure, using regular vents along the front and top with large porthole exhaust vents in the rear to pull the air through and out.

Seeking a bit of reprieve from the sun  it becomes apparent that the Kask Infinity is best employed for aero-intense rides and days that don't climb above about 85.
Seeking a bit of reprieve from the sun, it becomes apparent that the Kask Infinity is best employed for aero-intense rides and days that don't climb above about 85.

Weight


350g makes this one of the heavier high-performance helmets out on the market, but aero TT and aero road helmets tend to skew to that side of the scale. This model's weight can be attributed to a few extras that contribute to its aerodynamics, comfort, and safety. It uses an extra polycarbon layer, which it calls MITTM Technology, over the top, base ring, and back of the shell to improve safety, slip, and durability. Its polystyrene layer is a bit bulkier, but it adds protection and smooths out the traditional features that increase drag on standard road helmets.


We get it, weight matters in cycling and you've been doing squats and skipping beer and tacos to get that W/kg ratio above 3 all season and you're not trying to slide backward, but keep in mind a pound is about 450g - this helmet probably weighs less than a two-hundredth of you. But weight weenies will be delighted to know that the POC Octal, which comes in at just 241g, but its large honeycomb design won't have nearly the aerodynamic performance of the bulky Kask. A better option might be the even weenier Giro Aeon, just 225g and slipperier than the Octal.

350g is heavy in terms of road helmets  but it's not too bad for aero road helmets. If you're worried about cutting through the wind  a few grams shouldn't frighten you.
350g is heavy in terms of road helmets, but it's not too bad for aero road helmets. If you're worried about cutting through the wind, a few grams shouldn't frighten you.

Best Application


This a versatile road helmet that will excel in pursuits especially aided by aerodynamics. Sprinting and time trialing will see the best gains from this helmet, but it's an all-around great helmet, especially in cooler weather where it's not as problematic to keep the vent closed and have a warm head.

Cool  cloudy days are really where the Infinity outperforms a lot of the other helmets - not only is it super aero  but it keeps your head a lot warmer.
Cool, cloudy days are really where the Infinity outperforms a lot of the other helmets - not only is it super aero, but it keeps your head a lot warmer.

Value


$369.95 can be a bit of an ask for a helmet, but this is a pretty versatile product, offering excellent aerodynamic qualities without seriously sacrificing comfort and practicality. If you want an aero helmet, but don't want to carry around two helmets or pony up for a premium road helmet and a premium aero helmet, this asking price isn't bad - especially if you find discounts…

Conclusion


This is absolutely one of the coolest helmets in the bunch and it was the first one we reached for on all but the heat waviest days. Its adjustable helped keep the head warm in early spring (you know, when it still snows every a few weeks), and surprisingly cool as the temperatures and humidity both got into the 90s. A related factor here is padding, the double-edged sword. It's thick and cushy, making it perhaps the single most comfortable helmet in the pack. While the smooth fabric limits friction, it adds to the insulation - warm in cool weather and really warm in hot weather. Not only does the sliding vent design allow a degree of temperature regulation, but it also allows for superior aerodynamic performance when closed, which, of course, is largely why it earned our Top Pick for Aero award. The other factors relate to its excellent comfort and the broad applicability of it - it's a straight road helmet that could almost double as a TT helmet, but lacks the teardrop shape. If you are in the market for a road helmet that you want to do a little bit of time trialing or sprinting in, especially if you are in a cooler clime, we think you will very much love the Kask Infinity.

One of the coolest things about the Kask Infinity is cruising (read: grinding in pain) up the side of a mountain with the vents open  catching a breeze  then cresting and opening the vent to slice down the side.
One of the coolest things about the Kask Infinity is cruising (read: grinding in pain) up the side of a mountain with the vents open, catching a breeze, then cresting and opening the vent to slice down the side.


Ryan Baham