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Shimano M530 SPD Review

If you're looking for a full featured pedal with great value and don't care much about weight, the M530 may be your ticket.
Best Buy Award
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Price:  $68 List | $46.12 at Amazon
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Versatile, inexpensive, easy to use, adjustable tension
Cons:  Heavy for their size, painted surface can be slippery
Manufacturer:   Shimano
By Joshua Hutchens ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 22, 2017
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70
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 19
  • Ease of Exit - 25% 8
  • Ease of Entry - 20% 7
  • Adjustability - 20% 8
  • Weight - 15% 5
  • Platform - 10% 5
  • Mud Shedding Ability - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The M530 is Shimano's least expensive offering in the mini-platform pedal category. We prefer the mini-platform models as we find them the most versatile and widely appealing. They're easier to clip into than pedals without a cage, but typically much lighter and lower profile than full platform pedals. The mini platform also provides a larger interface between pedal and shoe resulting in more stability.

This pedal was well liked by our testers. They're very user-friendly, have adjustable tension on the clipless mechanism, can be installed with either a 6mm allen wrench or a pedal wrench, and are also available for an incredibly reasonable price. By comparison, the Crankbrothers Candy 7, also a mini-platform pedal, costs twice as much and has none of the adjustability or versatile installation options. The biggest drawback with the M530 is that it is surprisingly heavy for its size. If it weighed just a bit less, we could recommend it more widely.


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Pros Versatile, inexpensive, easy to use, adjustable tensionLightweight, adjustable, low profile, inexpensive, available in many colors.Lightweight, low profile, available in 2 different axle lengthsSilky smooth float, lightweight, great mud shedding, additional platform widthPlatform feel, proven durability, good value
Cons Heavy for their size, painted surface can be slipperyHeavier cleats, float isn't as smooth as ShimanoNarrow platform, expensive, not recommended for trail or all-mountain ridingExpensive, rear platform is under utilized, questionable durabilityHigher stack than the XTR, lower mud clearance
Bottom Line If you're looking for a full featured pedal with great value and don't care much about weight, the M530 may be your ticket.Thinner, lighter, and less expensive than the Shimano XTR Trail with more usable platform and more adjustability.A highly evolved, race proven pedal that provides exceptional stability for its size.Top of the line offering from Shimano, they're silky smooth, adjustable and renowned for their consistency.This do it all pedal for most riders it renown for its durability and value.
Rating Categories Shimano M530 SPD HT Components T1 Shimano XTR M9100 Race Shimano XTR M9120 Trail Shimano Deore XT M8020
Ease Of Exit (25%)
10
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8
10
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8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
Ease Of Entry (20%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
8
Adjustability (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
Weight (15%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
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9
10
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7
10
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7
Platform (10%)
10
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5
10
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8
10
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5
10
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6
10
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7
Mud Shedding Ability (10%)
10
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7
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
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8
10
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8
Specs Shimano M530 SPD HT Components T1 Shimano XTR M9100... Shimano XTR M9120... Shimano Deore XT...
Weight per Pair (grams) 453g 372g 314g 397g 404g
Weight of Cleats and Bolts (grams) 50g 62g 51g 51g 50g
Cleat Type SPD mountain HT X1 or HT X1F SPD mountain SPD mountain SPD mountain
Style mini-cage mini-cage no cage no cage mini-cage
Platform Dimensions (lxw) 93 x 69 mm 68mm x 83.5mm 71 x 68 mm 100 x 71 mm 96 x 64 mm
profile height 22mm 16.8mm 17mm 17mm 21mm
Q-Factor 56mm 56mm 56mm 56mm 56mm
Total Width from Crank Arm 87mm 90mm 84mm 84mm 89mm
Entry 2-sided 2-sided 2-sided 2-sided 2-sided
Adjustable Tension yes yes yes yes yes
Traction Pins 0 4grubpins 0 0 0
Bearings dual angular contact, plastic retainer EVO+ dual angular contact, metal retainer dual angular contact, metal retainer dual angular contact, metal retainer
Cage Material painted aluminum extruded/CNC machined aluminum annodized aluminum annodized aluminum annodized aluminum
Pedal Wrench Type 6mm allen or 15mm open end 8mm allen 8mm allen 8mm allen 8mm alllen

Our Analysis and Test Results

This model is the least expensive version of Shimano's small platform pedals. Similar in function to the XT M8020 and XTR M9120 it offers a secure feel and predictable performance in a practical package. While not embellished with fancy features, it doesn't come up short. This Shimano model is an incredibly versatile pedal for a very attractive price.

Performance Comparison


A tester stomping on the Shimano M530's.
A tester stomping on the Shimano M530's.

Ease of Entry


Getting into your pedals should be simple and a quick entry allows you to start putting the power down right away. Like the other mini platforms from Shimano, the small cage makes it easier to clip into this pedal. The cage shape seems to guide your foot toward the clipless mechanism and provide a trouble free entry. As the shoe engages the cage on the pedal, it flattens the pedal against the foot, placing the clipless mechanism in just the right spot to clip in.


Tied with the M530 for ease of entry is the Shimano XTR M9100, but they excel for very different reasons. Lacking the user-friendly cage, the M9100 has a slick coating and engages readily, provided you're accurate. They have comparable ease of entry but the M530 would be our recommendation for those new to clipless pedals or those unclipping often.

M530 on the left and M9000 on the right.
M530 on the left and M9000 on the right.

In general, our testers think the Shimano SPD pedals are amongst the easiest to clip into. They emit an audible and satisfying click when you engage assuring you that they're ready to ride. The Time and Crank Brothers pedals, by contrast, have a much less consistent and vague sound and feel.

Ease of Exit


It's almost certainly the number one concern for first-time users and a significant performance quality for even the most experienced riders. With the M530, there's nothing about the mechanism or the platform that hinders your exit. Regardless of shoe choice, we find these to be just as easy to get out of as they are to get in.


Adjustability


Like all SPD mountain pedals, this pedal has a wide range of spring tension adjustment from very firm to quite soft. Tension is adjusted with a 3mm Allen key on either side of the pedal. Make both sides equal by twisting the adjuster all the way in one direction, then counting the detents, there are 20 from end to end. Lefty loosie, righty tighty…


Another versatility bonus to this model is that it can be installed with either a 6mm Allen wrench or a standard pedal wrench. Most riders will only do this once, but it is convenient to have both options. By contrast, all the CrankBrothers pedals (and all other pedals in this test) can only be installed with an 8mm Allen key.

Each side of the pedal features an adjustment for spring tension. The 3mm allen slot allows you to customize how easy it is to get in and out of the pedals. There are 20 detents from end to end.
Each side of the pedal features an adjustment for spring tension. The 3mm allen slot allows you to customize how easy it is to get in and out of the pedals. There are 20 detents from end to end.

Weight


Unfortunately, this pedal is much heavier than it looks. The test pair weighed 453 grams on our scale which is a couple of grams lighter than the claimed weight of 455. The extra weight of this otherwise low profile pedal is its biggest downside and is the only aspect that would make us think twice before installing it on our cross-country bike.


For comparison, this mini-platform pedal actually weighs 33 grams more than the far more substantial Crankbrothers Mallet E, which is much larger and packed with traction pins. For the real gram counting racers, we suggest the Crankbrothers Eggbeater 3, which is the lightest pedal in our review weighing in at 175 grams less (and the cleats save you an additional 17 grams) but cost twice as much. If low weight is a priority for you, then you'll probably want to steer clear of these.

The Shimano Mini-platform lline-up in descending weight order  M530 at 453 grams  M8020 at 404 grams and the M9020 at 372 grams.
The Shimano Mini-platform lline-up in descending weight order, M530 at 453 grams, M8020 at 404 grams and the M9020 at 372 grams.

Platform


The M530 has a mini-platform and no traction pins. This platform allows for a quicker and more confidence inspiring engagement, and also gives your foot a place to rest if you don't clip in immediately. The interface between shoe and pedal is much bigger than you get with a non-platform pedal.


The Shimano mini platform pedals all look pretty similar, but the painted surface of the M530 feels a bit slippery when wet, changing the feeling of your float. If you're planning on riding in the wet, you might benefit from the machined surface on the Shimano M8020, it provides similar friction wet or dry.

Winner of the Best Buy Award  the Practical Shimano M530 mountain bike pedal  is a versatile  inexpensive pedal that is easy to use and at home on almost any mountain bike.
Winner of the Best Buy Award, the Practical Shimano M530 mountain bike pedal, is a versatile, inexpensive pedal that is easy to use and at home on almost any mountain bike.

Mud Shedding Ability


The more substantial and painted cage body holds a bit more mud than on the higher end versions of this pedal, but it still manages reasonably well. Large voids and relatively concealed spring mechanisms give it at least a fighting chance in the soupy stuff.


Lacking the fancy technology of the higher end Shimano pedals, it doesn't really compete. It did, however, fair better than the Xpedo GFX in the mud and muck. The XTR M9120, with the slippery coating and ovalized axle body, are designed for beating muddy trail conditions.

Best Applications


This pedal will work for almost all styles of trail riding. They'd go on a cross-country bike, an all-mountain bike, or an enduro/freeride bike. The only bike where they might feel out of place is on a downhill bike as those bikes have trended toward more substantial pedals. Since these pedals are quick to clip into, we think they are a particularly good fit for those new to clipless pedals as they'll be more prone to clipping in and out often.

The Shimano M530 can be installed or removed with either a standard pedal wrench or a 6mm allen wrench.
The Shimano M530 can be installed or removed with either a standard pedal wrench or a 6mm allen wrench.

Value


Though we try not to consider the price too heavily when considering our Editors' Choice winners, with this pedal, the price is hard to ignore. One of the least expensive pedals in our test, it's one we feel good about recommending to friends.

Putting the M530 to the climbing test.
Putting the M530 to the climbing test.

Conclusion


This SPD pedal with a small platform quickly became the favorite among several of our testers, which is why we awarded it our Best Buy Award. The small platform makes this pedal more versatile than the cageless version because it is easier to clip into, but it isn't quite as bulky as a full platform model. It can be at home on a cross-country bike, an all-mountain machine, or an enduro bike. We think very few people will be disappointed with this pedal.

Recommended Pairing


This pedal can be worn with either a stiff shoe, like the Sidi Dominator, or a soft shoe like the Five Ten Kestrel. Even better, it can go with a shoe that falls in the middle and has a stiff sole and grippy Vibram rubber, like the Giro Terraduro. It can also be used on almost any type of trail bike, from hardtail to 6 inches of travel.


Joshua Hutchens