The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Smith Forefront 2 MIPS Review

The highly anticipated Forefront 2 replaces the original with the same great fit and several notable improvements.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $230 List | $230.00 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Adjustable visor, MIPS, Koroyd protection, improved ventilation, good coverage
Cons:  Expensive, still not as ventilated as the competition
Manufacturer:   Smith Optics
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 10, 2019
  • Share this article:
83
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 12
  • Protection - 25% 9
  • Comfort - 20% 9
  • Ventilation - 20% 6
  • Features - 15% 9
  • Weight - 10% 8
  • Durability - 10% 9

Our Verdict

The Forefront 2 is the recently updated version of Smith's top of the line Forefront mountain bike helmet. The new version shares a similar unique look, but several notable design improvements set the Forefront 2 apart from its predecessor. First, the Forefront 2 has a bit less of a space-age look to it with a new vent layout and a slimmer and lower profile all around. Smith also improved ventilation dramatically with a new vent layout, larger vent holes, and an open channel down the center of the helmet that allows air to flow more freely. It also has a sturdier 3-position adjustable visor that flips up high to accommodate goggles and low to keep the sun out of your eyes. Combine all that with everything we loved about the old version, and you've got one of our new favorite mountain bike helmets. The Forefront 2 is available with or without the MIPS rotation protection system.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award 
Price $230.00 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$200 List$219.95 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare at 3 sellers
$300.00 at REI$179.00 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
83
100
0
89
100
0
87
100
0
80
100
0
79
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Adjustable visor, MIPS, Koroyd protection, improved ventilation, good coverageCrash detection system, lightweight, good ventilation, comfortable, adjustable visor, MIPS, good coverageWell ventilated, lightweight, great coverage, SPIN system, comfortableAdjustable visor, magnetic buckle, magnetic accessory mount, WaveCelGreat ventilation, comfortable, MIPS, lightweight
Cons Expensive, still not as ventilated as the competitionExpensiveExpensive, visor is less user friendly than the competitionExpensive, moderately heavy, somewhat bulky and bulbous appearanceVery little visor adjustment, not as much coverage as some
Bottom Line The highly anticipated Forefront 2 replaces the original with the same great fit and several notable improvements.The Specialized Ambush comes with a unique crash detection system and is one of the best helmets we've tested.The Tectal Race SPIN has great protection, comfort, and ventilation in a lightweight package, making it one of our favorites.The Blaze is an expensive fully-featured half shell helmet that comes equipped with Bontrager's new WaveCel technology.The A2 MIPS is a comfortable, well ventilated, and lightweight helmet from Troy Lee Designs.
Rating Categories Smith Forefront 2 MIPS Specialized Ambush with ANGi POC Tectal Race SPIN Bontrager Blaze WaveCel Troy Lee Designs A2 MIPS
Protection (25%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
Comfort (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
Ventilation (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
9
Features (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
6
Weight (10%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
5
10
0
8
Durability (10%)
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
Specs Smith Forefront 2... Specialized Ambush... POC Tectal Race SPIN Bontrager Blaze... Troy Lee Designs...
Rotational Impact Protection System? MIPS MIPS SL SPIN WaveCel MIPS
Adjustable Visor? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes, barely
Number of vents 20 20 15 13 13
Goggle or Sunglasses Guide Sunglass & goggle integration Yes, sunglass & goggle integration Yes, Goggle Clip Yes No
Weight 13.19 oz, 374g size Medium 12.35 oz, 350g, size Large 12.87 oz, 365g, size M/L 16.40 oz, 465g, size Large 13.26 oz, 376g
Sizes S - L S - L XS/S, M/L, XL/XXL S - L XS/S, M/L, XL/XXL

Our Analysis and Test Results

When the original Forefront helmet hit the market several years ago, its futuristic look and Koroyd material set it apart from the competition. Koroyd is a proprietary impact protection material that looks a lot like a honeycomb or a bunch of cross sections of straws packed tightly together. The claimed benefits of using this material are that it's lightweight and provides impact resistance while still allowing for ventilation. Opinions on the original Forefront were mixed, with the primary complaint being that the Koroyd didn't allow for the same level of airflow as larger open ventilation holes. Enter the Forefront 2, Smith's recently updated version of the Forefront that attempts to address some of the issues with the original version. Read on to find out more about the changes and how it compares to the competition.

Performance Comparison


The new Forefront 2 is an improvement over Smith's popular Forefront model  and one of our top-rated helmets.
The new Forefront 2 is an improvement over Smith's popular Forefront model, and one of our top-rated helmets.

Protection


In the world of mountain bike helmets, protection is the name of the game, and the Forefront 2 came to play. It has a high degree of head coverage, with a shape that comes down low on the back of the head. It doesn't have quite as much coverage as the POC Tectal Race SPIN or the Specialized Ambush with ANGi, both of which have a slightly deeper fit that dips lower by the temporal lobe and back of the head, but it isn't that far off. That said, it has as much or more coverage than most of the other helmets in our test.

The Forefront 2 is an extended coverage half shell helmet. It is outdone in the coverage department only by the POC Tectal Race SPIN and the Specialized Ambush with ANGi.
The Forefront 2 is an extended coverage half shell helmet. It is outdone in the coverage department only by the POC Tectal Race SPIN and the Specialized Ambush with ANGi.

The Forefront 2 we tested is equipped with an industry standard MIPS liner. The idea behind the MIPS liner is that it helps to reduce the rotational forces of an impact by providing a slip-plane that deflects some of the force through movement. Smith has been using MIPS liners in their helmets for years and in the Forefront 2 it isn't noticeable, nor does it affect the way the helmet fits.

The MIPS liner of the Forefront 2  note the minimal but well-placed padding and open air vents in the middle of the helmet.
The MIPS liner of the Forefront 2, note the minimal but well-placed padding and open air vents in the middle of the helmet.

Smith has designed the Forefront 2 with strips of EPS foam on the inside that run fore and aft and side to side. These line the edges of the large Koroyd panels inside the helmet. The outer shell sits around the outside of the Koroyd panels and consists of a thin layer of EPS foam with holes for ventilation that is covered in a protective polycarbonate shell.

A view of the inside of the helmet with the MIPS liner removed. Here you can see the inner foam "skeleton" as well as the large panel of Koroyd. Please note that removing the MIPS is much easier than putting back in.
A view of the inside of the helmet with the MIPS liner removed. Here you can see the inner foam "skeleton" as well as the large panel of Koroyd. Please note that removing the MIPS is much easier than putting back in.

As mentioned above, one of the things that sets the Forefront 2 apart from the competition is their use of Koroyd. Koroyd's honeycomb structure features lots of tightly packed little tubes creating an impact absorbing protective layer. The unique thing about the Koroyd is that it can absorb impact and allow air to pass through it at the same time. This means that you can cover more of the head with this material while keeping the weight low and still maintaining a reasonable level of ventilation. The tubes of the Koroyd are small enough that it stops most bugs from flying in, and prevents intrusion from sticks, rocks, and other hazards in the event of a crash.

A closeup view of the Koroyd in the Forefront 2. The structure looks reminiscent of a honeycomb and provides impact resistance and airflow at the same time.
A closeup view of the Koroyd in the Forefront 2. The structure looks reminiscent of a honeycomb and provides impact resistance and airflow at the same time.

The Koroyd in the Forefront 2 is split into four large panels, one on either side of the top of the head and two on either side of the back of the head. All but the three vents in the center of the helmet have Koroyd visible underneath them. Smith has designed a helmet that has only three completely open vent holes. As a result, it covers more of your head than any other helmet in our test. Other helmets have open vent holes that may allow hazards to penetrate it.

The outer shell of the helmet sits outside of the Koroyd panels and consists of foam covered in a plastic shell.
The outer shell of the helmet sits outside of the Koroyd panels and consists of foam covered in a plastic shell.

Comfort


Much like the original, the Forefront 2 has a comfortable and crowd-pleasing fit. This starts with the length and width, which fits a broad range of head shapes and sizes and are very similar to the previous version. Smith has also employed their Vaporfit adjustment system in the Forefront 2, so you can quickly and easily tighten and loosen it. Turning the dial pulls tension evenly from both sides on the adjustment straps for a snug and secure fit. The entire Vaporfit system can also be adjusted at its attachment points, found at the temples and the back of the head. Each attachment point has four holes, allowing you to adjust strap length to adjust the system for your comfort further.

Inside the helmet, you'll find minimal but well-placed anti-microbial padding from the temples across the forehead, with just a little on the top of the head. We'll go into more detail below, but the Forefront 2's ventilation is better than the original, and it increases this helmet's comfort as the temperatures rise.

Testers found the straps of the Forefront 2 to be one place the helmet could use a little improvement.
Testers found the straps of the Forefront 2 to be one place the helmet could use a little improvement.

The straps could be improved though. Locking strap splitters at the bottom of each ear allow you to adjust the nylon ear and chin straps. The chin strap is adjusted and secured below the chin with a standard plastic buckle. This strap system works just fine, but the straps occasionally conflict with testers' ears and never sit quite as flat as we would like. Admittedly, this strap adjustment system works fine, but the POC Tectal Race SPIN does it better. Its superior strap yoke prevents unwanted contact between the straps and your ears.

The Forefront 2 has a great fit and improved ventilation making it more comfortable in warmer temperatures than its predecessor.
The Forefront 2 has a great fit and improved ventilation making it more comfortable in warmer temperatures than its predecessor.

Ventilation


One of the biggest improvements made in the new Forefront 2 is increased ventilation. Smith accomplished this in a couple of ways. The first and most obvious difference is the size of the vent holes in the outermost part of the shell. Pretty much every vent is much larger than before, which allows more air to pass through. There is also a row of three vents in the center of the helmet that don't have any Koroyd underneath them. These open vents also have a small channel that allows air to flow from the front to the back. These changes may seem minor, but they do improve the ventilation compared to the original.

A comparative view of the old Forefront  left  and the Forefront 2  right. Notice the larger vents on the Forefront 2 version  as well as the open vent holes in the center of the helmet.
A comparative view of the old Forefront, left, and the Forefront 2, right. Notice the larger vents on the Forefront 2 version, as well as the open vent holes in the center of the helmet.

There are 20 total vents on the outside of the Forefront 2, 17 of which have Koroyd underneath them. While the Koroyd does allow air to pass through, most of the holes don't face the direction of travel, and moving air, as you ride. For example, the Koroyd over the forehead faces straight forward allowing for air to pass directly to the forehead. However, the Koroyd holes on top of the head face straight up and don't necessarily catch the air as you move forward. There also is only one air channel inside the helmet, so air has less of a chance to flow as well as it does in helmets with more channeling. The Bontrager Blaze and its WaveCel layer is somewhat similar to the Koroyd, though the gaps in the structure are slightly larger and airflow is marginally better.

Testing the ventilation of the Forefront 2 on a hot late summer day.
Testing the ventilation of the Forefront 2 on a hot late summer day.

The majority of our time spent testing the Forefront 2 was in Lake Tahoe in late summer. It rarely breaks the 90-degree mark in these parts, but at elevation the intense sun often makes it feel much warmer than it is. Our test rides ranged primarily between 70 and 85 degrees, with more than our fair share of that California sunshine. In that temperature range, our testers found the Forefront 2 to feel cooler than the previous version, and fairly cool in general.

During side by side ventilation testing, however, we found that helmets with fully open vents did feel cooler. Yes, the POC Tectal and the Troy Lee A2, do allow more air to flow around the head than the Forefront 2, but it is still manageable until the temperatures really soar. Not surprisingly, we found the Smith Session to provide more ventilation, with large open vents and less Koroyd placed strategically around the sides of the helmet. The Specialized Ambush outperformed all of the other helmets in this test with more and larger vents and internal air channels that really keep the air moving.

Features


The Forefront 2 is a top of the line helmet offered at a premium price that comes with virtually all the features you'd expect. We've touched on protective features like Koroyd and MIPS above, as well as comfort features like the fit adjustment system and strap design. Optics integration is something that Smith has hung their hat on with their cycling helmets, and that continues with the Forefront 2.

With the visor in the high position  there is plenty of room to store your goggles while not in use.
The Forefront 2 works great with goggles  especially the Smith Squad MTB.

The visor on the Forefront 2 adjusts into three positions and feels much sturdier than the one on the previous version. In its low position, the visor is a good length to block the sun from your eyes without obscuring your view of the trail ahead. It has a middle setting for those who don't like to see the visor at all when descending. In the high position, it flips way up to accommodate goggles when not in use. The visor rotates on durable metal hardware by the temples and has well-defined stopping points for each position.

The helmet also has a channel that rings the helmet and is designed to securely stow your sunglasses, either front or rear, when not in use. The arms of the glasses grab onto the helmet within the channel and hold relatively securely. We're a little wary of stowing our sunglasses in this way on rough trails, but it seems to work well on smoother trails and roads. The only other helmet in this review that has eyewear integration features is the Oakley DRT5.

Integration with optics is on point with the Forefront 2  which can hold your sunglasses either front or rear in the channel that runs around the top of the head.
Integration with optics is on point with the Forefront 2, which can hold your sunglasses either front or rear in the channel that runs around the top of the head.

It also has an integrated camera and light mount on the top of the helmet. This mount is a small threaded metal insert that hides under a small plastic cover. Use of the mount requires a special mounting kit that is available as an aftermarket purchase. A helmet bag is also included.

The camera and light mount is a small threaded metal insert that is hidden beneath a plastic tab on the top of the helmet. A mounting kit is necessary and can be purchased for $15.
The camera and light mount is a small threaded metal insert that is hidden beneath a plastic tab on the top of the helmet. A mounting kit is necessary and can be purchased for $15.

Weight


Weighing in at 374 grams, or 13.19 oz, the Forefront 2 falls into the same weight range as several other helmets in our test. The Smith Session, Leatt DBX 3.0, Giro Chronicle, and the Troy Lee A2 all weigh between 5-10 grams more than the Forefront 2. Our Editors' Choice Award winner, the Specialized Ambush with ANGi managed to come in at 350 grams, which is just 24 grams lighter. Differences in weight that small are hardly noticeable, but all other things being equal, lighter is better. In contrast, the Oakley DRT5 weighs over 100 grams more than the Forefront 2 and offers a similar level of protection, comfort, and features.

The Forefront 2 weighs in at 374 grams or 13.19 oz  slightly less than their claimed weight of 13.4 oz for the size medium we tested.
The Forefront 2 weighs in at 374 grams or 13.19 oz, slightly less than their claimed weight of 13.4 oz for the size medium we tested.

Durability


Throughout testing, the Forefront 2 proved to be a highly durable helmet. All of the adjustable components like the Vaporfit system, the straps, and the visor continue to work well. The EPS foam is covered with a dense layer of plastic that wraps around the edges in all the places that are susceptible to damage. The plastic outer shell shows no signs of denting, although there are a couple of incredibly minor scratches in the matte finish from unexpected low hanging branches. Beyond that, the Forefront 2 still looks as new as the day we got it.

Best Applications


The Forefront 2 has a huge bandwidth and is suitable for a variety of types of riding. Everything from everyday trail riding to enduro racing is in this helmet's wheelhouse. If you were turned off by the ventilation of the original Forefront, trust us when we say this is an improvement. XC racers and very weight conscious riders may want to look elsewhere. The extended coverage and numerous features give this helmet a little more heft than an XC race or road bike lid. People living in very hot climates may also be better off looking into airier helmets. The Koroyd ventilation is a huge improvement but may not be enough for some.

The Forefront 2 is up for virtually all types of mountain bike riding  from all day XC trail riding epics to enduro races.
The Forefront 2 is up for virtually all types of mountain bike riding, from all day XC trail riding epics to enduro races.

Value


With a retail price of $230, the Forefront 2 is one of the most expensive helmets in our test selection. It comes in just $10 more than the POC Tectal Race SPIN. No matter how you look at it, these helmets are expensive. If there's one piece of protective equipment you should splurge on, however, we feel that a quality helmet is it. The Forefront 2 is most definitely a high-quality mountain bike helmet with protective features like a MIPS liner and Koroyd, a great fit, quality adjustments, and a unique look. It also comes with a lifetime warranty. Considering the all-around performance and protection that this helmet offers, we feel that it is a good value assuming you can justify the expense.

Conclusion


It's not cheap, but the Smith Forefront 2 MIPS is one of those products that we feel is worth the added expense. This updated version maintains all of the things we liked about the old version while addressing its weaknesses. It still has the same great fit and coverage but with a slimmer and lower profile shape all around. The most notable improvements are in the helmet's ventilation. With an updated vent layout that includes 20 vents, 3 of which are wide open down the middle, the Forefront 2 has much better airflow than the old version and now performs nearly as well as much of the competition. A new design also resulted in a sturdier and more robust visor that works better with goggles. Overall, we are incredibly impressed with the Forefront 2 and it quickly became one the favorite models in our test.

If you're willing to shell out the cash  the Forefront 2 is one of the best and most protective mountain bike helmets on the market.
If you're willing to shell out the cash, the Forefront 2 is one of the best and most protective mountain bike helmets on the market.

Other Versions and Accessories


Smith makes a full line of cycling helmets including the Forefront 2 MIPS reviewed here. It is available in seven different color options to suit a wide range of tastes. Some of the color options are available without MIPS as well and retail for a bit less.

The Session is another great helmet in Smith's lineup that provides a similar level of coverage with better ventilation and a lower retail price.

To use the integrated camera and light mount on the Forefront 2 you'll need to purchase the Forefront 2 Mount Kit. This mount kit retails for $15 and works on both the original Forefront and Forefront 2 models.


Jeremy Benson