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Commencal Meta Power TR Ride Review

A ripping, versatile eMTB that can tackle the gnarly stuff in a relatively budget-friendly package
Commencal Meta Power TR Ride
Photo: Laura Casner
Best Buy Award
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Price:  $5,299 List
Pros:  Reasonable price (relatively speaking), fun on a wide range of terrain, confident descender, solid distance range
Cons:  Mediocre suspension components, SRAM SX drivetrain, can be a handful in tight spots
Manufacturer:   Commencal
By Jeremy Benson, Joshua Hutchens, Chris McNamara  ⋅  Jan 20, 2021
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85
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 5
  • Downhill Performance - 30% 9
  • Climbing Performance - 20% 7
  • Distance Range - 25% 9
  • Power Output - 15% 8
  • E-Bike Controls - 10% 9

Our Verdict

E-bikes are expensive, so we're always on the hunt for great values like the Commencal Meta Power TR 29 Ride. It's one of the least expensive eMTBs we've tested, but it doesn't perform like an entry-level model. This versatile ride has 140mm of rear suspension paired with a 150mm fork and a long and slack geometry. It thrives at speed and in aggressive terrain and is fun on mellower trails. Point and shoot on the climbs and it powers up anything in its path. The new Shimano EP8 motor works well and the 630Wh battery gives it an impressive distance range. The budget-conscious Ride build we tested has some notable low points but didn't seem to detract much from its shredding prowess out on the trail.

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Awards Best Buy Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award 
Price $5,299 List$7,500 List$7,499 List$7,500 List$7,000 List
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Pros Reasonable price (relatively speaking), fun on a wide range of terrain, confident descender, solid distance rangeOutstanding battery life, whisper quiet motor, just right geometry, intuitive operationVery competitive price, awesome build, 3 build options, versatile and well-rounded, high fun factorPowerful motor, good distance range, well-rounded performanceLightweight for an e-bike, normal trail bike feel, range extender battery, quiet motor
Cons Mediocre suspension components, SRAM SX drivetrain, can be a handful in tight spotsReadout display not standard feature, SRAM Guide brakes not powerful enough, reported motor failuresOnly 540Wh battery option, shorter distance range, some minor motor rattleBattery or motor rattle, expensive, sluggish handling at low speedsLess battery storage capacity, less powerful drive unit, expensive
Bottom Line A ripping, versatile eMTB that can tackle the gnarly stuff in a relatively budget-friendly packageClass-leading range, power, and innovation make this our top-rated eMTB for the third year in a rowA versatile and well-rounded trail/all-mountain eMTB with a great build at a competitive priceA well-rounded electric mountain bike with a solid distance rangeLighter weight and less powerful, the new Levo SL is the e-bike for the rider who seeks a "regular" trail bike experience with a just a little pedal assistance
Rating Categories Commencal Meta Powe... Specialized Turbo L... YT Decoy 29 Core 4 Trek Rail 9.7 Specialized Turbo L...
Downhill Performance (30%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
9.0
Climbing Performance (20%)
7.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
Distance Range (25%)
9.0
10.0
8.0
10.0
6.0
Power Output (15%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
E Bike Controls (10%)
9.0
7.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Specs Commencal Meta Powe... Specialized Turbo L... YT Decoy 29 Core 4 Trek Rail 9.7 Specialized Turbo L...
Battery Size (Wh) 630Wh 700Wh 540Wh 625Wh 320Wh (+160Wh Range Extender)
Wheel size (inches) 29 29 29 29 29
Motor System Shimano EP8 Specialized 2.1, Custom Rx Trail-tuned 250W Shimano EP8 Bosch Performance Line CX Specialized SL 1.1 (240W)
Motor Power (torque) 85Nm 90Nm 85Nm 85Nm 35Nm
Measured Weight (w/o pedals) 53 lbs 8 oz (Large) 50 lbs 7 oz (Large) 49 lbs 5 oz (Large) 49 lbs 10 oz (Medium) 41 lbs 10 oz (Large)(2lbs 6 oz - range extender battery)
Measured Effective Range 26.1 miles 29.6 miles 23.2 miles 28.95 miles 13 miles
Fork RockShox 35 Gold RL, 150mm RockShox Lyrik Select RC DebonAir Fox 36 Float Factory E-bike+, 150mm RockShox Yari RC e-MTB, 160mm Fox Rhythm 34 Float 150mm
Suspension & Travel Contact System 4-bar, 140mm Future Shock Rear (FSR) - 150mm V4L Virtual 4-Link 145mm Active Braking Pivot, 150mm Future Shock Rear (FSR) - 150mm
Shock RockShox Deluxe Select+ RockShox Deluxe Select+ Fox Float DPS Factory RockShox Deluxe Select+ Fox Float DPS Performance
Frame Material Alloy 6066 M5 Premium Aluminum Carbon Fiber OCLV Carbon M5 Premium Alloy
Frame Size Tested Large Large Large Medium Large
Available Sizes M-XL S-XL S-XXL S-XL XS-XL
Wheelset Spank Spike Race 33 rims with Formula hubs Roval Traverse 29, 30mm internal Crankbrothers Synthesis Alloy e-MTB with I9 1/1 hubs Bontrager Line Comp 30 Roval Traverse 29, 30mm internal
Front Tire Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO+ 2.4" Specialized Butcher GRID GRIPTON 2.6" Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 29" x 2.5" WT Bontrager XR5 Team Issue 2.6" Specialized Butcher GRID TRAIL GRIPTON 2.3"
Rear Tire Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO+ 2.4" Specialized Eliminator BLCK DMND 2.3" Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO+ 29" x 2.4" WT Bontrager XR5 Team Issue 2.6" Specialized Eliminator GRID TRAIL 2.3"
Shifters SRAM SX Eagle SRAM S700 11-speed Shimano XT 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle
Rear Derailleur SRAM SX Eagle SRAM GX, 11-speed Shimano XT 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle
Crankset E13 E*Spec EP8 Praxis Shimano XT M8150 SRAM X1 1000 Praxis M30
Crankarm length 165mm 165mm 165mm 170mm
Bottom Bracket Part of motor system not specified Part of motor system not specified part of the motor
Cassette SRAM SX Eagle SRAM PG-1130 11-42t Shimano XT M8100 12-speed, 10-51T SRAM PG1230, 11-50T SRAM NX Eagle 11-50T
Chain SRAM NX Eagle KMC X11ET Shimano Hyperglide+ SRAM NX Eagle SRAM NX Eagle
Saddle Fabric Scoop Flat Sport V2 Specialized Bridge 155 S2 SDG Bel Air 3.0 YT Custom, 140mm Bontrager Arvada 138mm Specialized Bridge Comp
Seatpost KS Rage-I X-Fusion Manic 150mm YT Postman, 150mm (size Large) Bontrager Line Dropper, 150mm X-Fusion Manic 150mm (large)
Handlebar Ride Alpha R20 E-Bike, 780mm Specialized Trail 780mm Renthal Fatbar 35, 780mm Bontrager Comp Alloy, 780mm Specialized Trail 780mm
Stem Ride Alpha Freeride 50mm Specialized Trail Renthal Apex 35, 50mm Bontrager Rhythm Comp, 60mm Specialized Trail
Brakes SRAM Guide RE 4 piston 200mm rotors SRAM Guide RE 4 piston 200mm rotors SRAM Code RSC, 200mm rotors Shimano M6120 4-piston SRAM Guide R
Grips Ride Alpha DH Specialized Sip Grip ODI Elite Motion V2.1 Bontrager XR Trail Comp Specialized Trail
Measured Effective Top Tube (mm) 626 630 612 611 625
Measured Reach (mm) 485 460 463 450 454
Measured Head Tube Angle 64.5 66 66.3 High/ 65.8 Low 64.9 High /64.5 Low 66
Measured Seat Tube Angle 77.5 74.7 77.5 High/ 77 Low 75 74.5
Measured Bottom Bracket Height (mm) 347 345 High/338 Low 344 350
Measured Wheelbase (mm) 1279 1235 1241 1220 1218
Measured Chain Stay Length (mm) 453 455 458 447 437
Warranty Two Years Lifetime Five Years on frame Lifetime on frame Lifetime

Our Analysis and Test Results

Commencal is a direct-to-consumer mountain bike brand that makes everything from downhill and trail bikes to e-MTBs. We tested the more enduro-oriented Meta Power 29 Team in the past and found it to be a beast on the descents, but its performance was pretty one-dimensional. We got our hands on the TR (trail) version to see how it compares to the rest of our field. We tested the Ride build which is among the more affordable e-bikes on the market. While it has some low-end components, we were generally quite impressed with the performance of this versatile machine.

Performance Comparison


The Meta Power TR is a versatile trail riding e-MTB at a very...
The Meta Power TR is a versatile trail riding e-MTB at a very competitive price.
Photo: Laura Casner

Downhill Performance


We found the Meta Power TR to be a versatile descender with the chops to tackle aggressive terrain with confidence and still be fun on mellower trails. It's no slacked-out enduro shred sled, but we didn't find anywhere we felt under-gunned while testing. At the same time, it remains reasonably maneuverable considering its weight and dimensions. We feel Commencal hit an excellent middle ground where this bike is comfortable no matter what you put in front of it. Sure the suspension leaves a bit to be desired, but it performed better than we anticipated and the rest of the build is pretty well sorted for the price.


The TR in Meta Power TR 29 stands for trail, and with 140mm of rear travel and a 150mm fork, this bike slots nicely into the do-it-all trail bike travel bracket. It's got just enough squish to handle aggressive descents and mid-sized drops, but not so much travel that it feels excessively large and one-dimensional. It remains relatively maneuverable and fun to ride on flowy trails and mellower terrain, though its 53+ lb weight does require a bit of body english in the tight stuff and at lower speeds. That weight also helps give this bike a damp, ground-hugging feel and loads of traction when leaning it over in corners. Unlike the more enduro-focused Meta Power (not TR), however, the TR feels more well-rounded and enjoyable on a much wider range of terrain while still being confidence-inspiring when things get steep and rough. It's not the most nimble or playful ride, but it certainly doesn't feel lethargic or boring either. Commencal's Contact System 4bar Linkage suspension design also seems pretty dialed and it feels supple and smooth with enough progression to handle bigger hits. Impressive given the limitations of the rear shock on the Ride build.

This bike is long and slack, it feels great at speed and doesn't shy...
This bike is long and slack, it feels great at speed and doesn't shy away from aggressive terrain.
Photo: Laura Casner

When diving into the Meta Power TR's geometry numbers, we were actually surprised how versatile this bike was given its dimensions. All sizes have the same head tube angle of 64.5-degrees which is pretty darn slack, along with a 453mm chainstay/rear center length. Our size large test bike had a 626mm effective top tube length, a 485mm reach, and a long 1,279mm wheelbase. Those numbers definitely put the TR in the long and slack category, especially for a trail bike, and are the main reason why this bike is capable of charging so hard on the descents. The slack front end, relatively long reach, and long wheelbase position the rider confidently between the wheels, and this bike feels super damp and very, very stable at speed. It gives the rider plenty of room to move around, and this bike feels composed when rolling into something steep or chunky. Yes, all that length can feel like a bit of a handful in tight switchbacks or low-speed tech, but it felt easier to handle in those situations than we expected.

The Meta Power TR is heavy but still not opposed to some airtime and...
The Meta Power TR is heavy but still not opposed to some airtime and fun lines.
Photo: Laura Casner

The Ride build we tested makes some compromises to keep the price of this bike affordable (for an e-bike) but performed better than anticipated on the trail. The RockShox 35 Gold fork is a notable low-point, mostly due to its limited adjustability and our poor experiences with them on other bikes. That said, the e-bike rated version on the Meta Power TR feels pretty stout and more supple than we're used to with this fork. The RockShox Deluxe Select+ rear shock is equally unimpressive, but truthfully gave us little to complain about on the descents. SRAM's Guide T brakes aren't our favorite either, but the 4-piston calipers and 200mm rotors front and rear felt plenty powerful for this heavyweight bike. Commencal also thoughtfully chose some beefy rubber in the form of Maxxis Minion DHR II tires with the EXO+ casing which provide awesome cornering and braking traction. The cockpit setup also felt good straight out of the box with a sturdy front end and long dropper post.

Straight lines and power moves are this bike's forte on techy climbs.
Straight lines and power moves are this bike's forte on techy climbs.
Photo: Laura Casner

Climbing Performance


The Meta Power TR is a solid climber with a bit of a monster truck feel. A nice steep seat tube and the power delivered by the Shimano EP8 drive unit are the real highlights and help you blast up climbs as long as the turns aren't super sharp. This bike is certainly a bit heavy and quite long, factors that come into play at lower speeds and in tight spaces.


Power is one of the main things that help heavyweight e-bikes from feeling like boat anchors on the climbs, and the Meta Power TR has plenty on tap for this 53 lb 8 oz bike. Geometry is the other player, and this bike is long and relatively slack with a nice steep seat tube. You mix those two together, and the Meta has no problem cruising uphill, it just prefers straighter lines and blasting up over obstacles in the trail. The steep seat tube angle lines the rider up nicely above the bottom bracket in a comfortable position with great power transfer. Despite the length of the wheelbase and relatively slack head tube angle, the longer chainstays and steep seat tube combine to make the front end feel planted and responsive, even on steep sections. Technical uphill puzzles and tight switchbacks are where this bike's length and weight are most noticeable, requiring a bit of forethought to ride clean. That said, it's not as unwieldy as we expected given its numbers.

Grinding it out in the saddle is comfortable thanks to a steep seat...
Grinding it out in the saddle is comfortable thanks to a steep seat tube and roomy cockpit.
Photo: Laura Casner

Commencal's 4-bar suspension design offers pretty good pedaling support but remains relatively active. This results in loads of climbing traction and doesn't detract too much from the climbing experience thanks to the pedal assistance. The RockShox Deluxe Select+ shock on the Ride build doesn't have a compression damping switch, though we certainly would have preferred one for efficiency on road climbs. The Maxxis Minion DHR II isn't the fastest rolling, but it definitely provides loads of climbing traction and works well in a range of conditions. The SRAM SX Eagle drivetrain isn't particularly noteworthy, but it is worth mentioning that it comes with 160mm cranks. This shorter crank length might feel a little different if you're used to 175mm cranks, but it's easy to get used to and is intended to reduce the likelihood of pedal strikes.

The length and weight of this bike can be a bit of a handful in...
The length and weight of this bike can be a bit of a handful in tricky technical situations that you can't just power straight over.
Photo: Laura Casner

Interestingly, we found this bike to pedal surprisingly well without pedal assistance. Sure, it's heavy, but when the battery died on a test ride in the middle of a steep climb, the Meta was much easier to pedal to the top than we expected. In fact, we rode it for nearly 40 minutes with no assistance and were surprised by how normal it felt. There seems to be little, if any, drag in the system when the power is off. Not that most people will want to climb without any pedal assistance, but it's not terrible if you have to.

The EP8 motor feels plenty powerful and has no problem getting you...
The EP8 motor feels plenty powerful and has no problem getting you up to its top assisted speed of 20 mph.
Photo: Laura Casner

Power Output


The Meta Power TR 29 comes equipped with Shimano's newer EP8 motor which provides three levels of pedal assistance and a top supported speed of 20 mph. This new drive system is an improvement over the previous generation of Shimano motors, and it has more torque, less lag when you start pedaling, a smaller size, and lighter weight. Overall, we feel it is a more refined system and a nice spec on the least expensive build in the range.


The Shimano EP8 motor now delivers 85Nm of torque, putting it on par with the Bosch motor of the Trek Rail and just a hair behind the 90Nm of the Brose motor in the Specialized Turbo Levo. On the trail, the Meta Power TR feels plenty powerful whether blasting along the flats or grinding up a steep climb. Power comes on right away with virtually no lag, and it hangs on for just a second once the pedals stop turning. The three pedal assist modes, Eco, Trail, and Boost, provide a nice range of support to suit the terrain or your preferences. These pedal assist settings can also be customized using the Shimano e-tube app. This is a nice feature that allows you to adjust the level of assistance, max torque, and more for each mode to dial it in perfectly for your needs. Having the ability to fine-tune the support settings may not matter to everyone, but we really enjoyed it because we found the factory settings to be a bit too similar in Trail and Boost at higher torque levels, so we just went ahead and adjusted them.

Despite the many improvements made with the new EP8 motor, one thing that didn't change much was the noise level. We'd say it's a touch quieter than the previous version, and it doesn't have any annoying rattle coming from the housing, but it's still a bit more noticeable than the Turbo Levo, for example. It's relatively quiet in low torque situations, although the volume ramps up with the output from the motor. We don't think it's a deal-breaker, but it's certainly not as stealthy as some other systems.

The 630Wh battery has you covered for some long rides.
The 630Wh battery has you covered for some long rides.
Photo: Laura Casner

Range


With a large 630 Wh battery and Shimano's newer EP8 motor, the Meta Power TR impressed us with its distance range. In fact, it was one of the top performers in our standardized range test. During our test period, we also took it out for some lengthy tail rides and found that it can go the distance and rack up some serious vertical in the process.


Our standardized range test involves riding each eMTB in its highest output setting up and down a steep paved road for as long as possible to run the battery down from a full charge. We have the same rider test each bike in this way so that they are ridden in a consistent manner to reduce as many variables as possible. In our test, we rode the Meta Power TR 29 for 26.1 miles with 5,321 feet of elevation gain/loss. This is quite impressive, but not all that surprising given the larger 630 Wh battery and Shimano's new EP8 motor. In the field, we had similar results. One tester was doing laps on some super steep trails and logged over 6,000 vertical feet of climbing before draining the battery. Of course, this bike's range will depend on a huge number of factors including rider weight, terrain, temperature, and output setting, but when compared apples to apples with the other models in our test, it is up there with more expensive competitors. The Shimano e-tube app also gives you the ability to tweak the motor's output settings, which may help to extend battery life.

The power button is near the top of the down tube, streamlined...
The power button is near the top of the down tube, streamlined controls by the left grip, and a small display by the stem comprise the primary user interface on the Meta Power TR.
Photo: Laura Casner

E-Bike Controls


The Meta Power TR uses Shimano's EP8 motor system and the Shimano SC-EM800 display and handlebar-mounted controls. This is among our favorite systems with good ergonomics and a relatively easy-to-read display mounted next to the stem. Charging is relatively standard with an easily accessible charging port.


The Meta Power TR 29 has a large dedicated power button on the left side of the down tube. Pressing this button turns on/off power to the motor and display. The controls are mounted on the handlebar next to the left grip. This low-profile unit has 2 buttons that shift up or down through the motor's pedal assist modes. These controls are streamlined with good ergonomics and are very easy to reach with the thumb while riding. Activating the walk-assist mode involves pressing the bottom button until pedal-assist is off, then pressing and holding it while you walk.

The handlebar-mounted display is in a relatively safe spot next to...
The handlebar-mounted display is in a relatively safe spot next to the stem that is also pretty easy to see.
Photo: Laura Casner

The SC-EM800 display is attached to the handlebar and situated next to the stem in an easy-to-see location. This LCD-colored display shows current speed, pedal-assist mode, and remaining battery life on the main page. Assist mode is shown in small font but is also color-coded to make visual identification a little easier. Remaining battery life is displayed graphically with 5 bars representing the remaining battery charge that turn off progressively as the battery is depleted. A small button on the bottom of the unit allows you to toggle through several other pages with information like maximum speed, average speed, trip distance and time, estimated range, etc. We found the main page to be the most useful while riding. You can also connect via Bluetooth and the Shimano e-tube app to customize output settings and dial everything in to your preferences, and it's claimed to have improved connectivity with smartphones and GPS devices.

The charging port is situated right above the motor. It works fine...
The charging port is situated right above the motor. It works fine, but it can be difficult to close and seems susceptible to ingress from water and dust.
Photo: Laura Casner

The Meta Power TR 29 has a relatively standard charging cord that gets plugged in to a small charging port at the bottom of the down tube. This charging port has a small cover that folds up. While this system works just fine, it can require a bit of fiddling to get the cover closed, and we feel its location makes it more susceptible to ingress from water, dust and debris. We didn't have any issues during testing, but we think it's something to keep an eye on.

The aluminum frame of the Meta Power TR has a burly look and feel...
The aluminum frame of the Meta Power TR has a burly look and feel, clean lines, and a sweet gun metal paint job.
Photo: Laura Casner

Build


The Ride build of the Meta Power TR 29 we tested is the least expensive of the four builds offered. It has some notable weak points, but we found even the questionable components to perform relatively well out on the trail. Considering this is one of the least expensive eMTBs we've tested, we weren't complaining too loudly. Of course, you can also opt for one of the pricier options and get yourself into a nicer build to start with.

The RockShox 35 Gold fork performed better than expected, but would...
The RockShox 35 Gold fork performed better than expected, but would likely be the first thing we'd upgrade.
Photo: Laura Casner

The suspension components are the least impressive aspect of the Ride build we tested. The RockShox 35 Gold RL fork controls the 150mm of front wheel travel and is eMTB rated. While it isn't the plushest or most tuneable fork around, it feels significantly more sturdy and supple than the non-eMTB rated versions. This came as quite a surprise to us given its poor performance on various other bikes in the past. A simple RockShox Deluxe Select+ shock handles the 140mm of rear suspension. Again, this shock doesn't feel incredible, nor is it very tuneable, but it did its job admirably. We would have preferred a shock with a compression damping switch for climbing, but with the pedal-assist power it's not a deal-breaker.

Big rotors front and rear help keep your speed in check on this...
Big rotors front and rear help keep your speed in check on this heavy rig.
Photo: Laura Casner

The Meta Power TR 29 is capable of going pretty fast and the 53+ lb weight of this bike means you need some serious stoppers to control your speed. The SRAM Guide T brakes aren't our favorite, but the 4-piston version paired with 200mm rotors front and rear did a fine job of slowing and stopping this bike. Commencal spec'd a SRAM SX Eagle drivetrain, which is plenty easy to gripe about, but honestly worked pretty well for us during testing. It has more than enough gear range for an eMTB, but it's a bit heavy and doesn't shift under power as well as some other options.

Never underestimate the importance of quality tires. Maxxis Minion...
Never underestimate the importance of quality tires. Maxxis Minion DHR II's front and rear can stand up to this bike's weight and shredding prowess.
Photo: Laura Casner

One place that Commencal didn't skimp on was the ever-important tire selection. They equipped the Meta Power TR Ride with quality rubber front and rear so you won't have to shell out some cash immediately for tires that can handle this bike's weight and downhill capabilities. A matching set of Maxxis Minion DHR II in a 2.4-inch width with the beefier EXO+ casing provides excellent cornering and braking traction. The tougher EXO+ casing also provides additional sidewall support and puncture protection needed for a heavier e-bike. Those tires are mounted to Spank Spike Race 33 rims and Formula hubs. The rims have a 30mm internal width and they felt beefy enough to handle some big hits and chunky terrain during testing. Despite the wheels being tubeless-ready, we did have some difficulty seating the rear tire, and it required removing the pre-installed rim strip and replacing it with a double wrap of Stan's tape.

The cockpit is pretty well dialed with a wide handlebar, stiff stem...
The cockpit is pretty well dialed with a wide handlebar, stiff stem, and long travel dropper.
Photo: Laura Casner

The cockpit of the Meta Power TR 29 also felt pretty dialed and ready to back up some hard shredding on this bike. Commencal spec'd a number of components from their house brand, Ride Alpha, including the handlebar, stem, and grips. They chose a burly freeride stem and a 780mm wide 20mm rise handlebar with e-bike wire routing. This combo felt nice and stout and helped when muscling this heavy bike around. At the back of the bike, a 175mm (size L and XL) KS Rage-I dropper gets the seat low and out of the way. This dropper feels a little clunky but gets the job done. The Fabric Scoop Flat Sport saddle proved to be quite comfortable for any length of ride.

Value


Mountain biking is an expensive sport and adding a motor and battery into the equation only increases the price. When we purchased this bike it cost $4,999, making it a bit of a unicorn with a price under the $5K mark. Since then the price has gone up by $300, likely due to the current spike in bike demand and supply chain related parts availability, etc. That said, it's still one of the least expensive options on the market, and it comes with a burly frame, big battery, and quality drive system. We still feel it's a good value considering its well-rounded performance and solid distance range. It's absolutely a great entry-level eMTB and could be a really good option for the rider who likes to upgrade parts over time.

Conclusion


The Meta Power TR 29 is a versatile and hard-charging eMTB that is offered at a reasonable price (for an e-bike). This bike is long and slack, making it stable at speed and confident on aggressive trails, yet still loads of fun in more casual terrain. It's also a comfortable climber with a bit of a monster truck feel. Yes, it is a bit of a handful in super tight terrain due to its length and weight. The new Shimano EP8 motor is an impressive spec at this price point and the 630Wh battery grants it an impressive range. The Ride build we tested is budget-friendly, and while there are some low points, everything came together pretty well on the trail. If you're looking for a ripping e-bike that won't break the bank, we think the Meta Power TR is a great option to consider.

It may be one of the least expensive electric mountain bikes we've...
It may be one of the least expensive electric mountain bikes we've tested, but the Meta Power TR Ride is a great bike that is a blast to ride.
Photo: Laura Casner

Other Versions


The Meta Power TR 29 is offered in 4 complete builds including the Ride version we tested.

If you're willing to spend a little bit more, the Race build will set you back $5,999, but comes with several key component upgrades. It has a more tuneable RockShox Lyrick Select+ fork, SRAM Guide RE brakes with 220mm rotors, A SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain, and trusty DT Swiss H 1900 Spline wheels.

The next step up is the Signature build at $7,199 (still less than the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp). It comes with flashy Fox Factory suspension and dropper post, Shimano XT brakes and drivetrain, and DT Swiss H 1700 Spline wheels.

The top of the line build is the Ohlins AXS. It comes with an Ohlins suspension package, Shimano XT brakes, a SRAM GX Eagle AXS drivetrain, a RockShox Reverb AXS dropper post, and DT Swiss H 1700 Spline wheels. At $7,899 it's a screaming deal for an AXS equipped bike.

Jeremy Benson, Joshua Hutchens, Chris McNamara

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