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Topeak JoeBlow Booster Review

A high-quality and high priced model that replaces an air compressor to inflate tubeless tires
Topeak JoeBlow Booster
Photo: Topeak
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $200 List | Check Price at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Excellent performance, universal nozzle, long hose, air bleed valve, easy to read gauge
Cons:  Expensive, heavy, hard work to fill chamber, gauge struggles at low pressures
Manufacturer:   ToPeak
By Clark Tate ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 8, 2021
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67
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 11
  • Ease of Attachment - 25% 6
  • Inflation - 25% 6
  • Stability - 20% 8
  • Accuracy - 15% 6
  • Gauge - 15% 8

Our Verdict

The Topeak JoeBlow Booster works as a regular floor pump and as a manual air compressor, letting you install your own tubeless tires and making it a great choice for both professional and recreational users. The pump is well built, with metal incorporated in highly used and abused components — such as the steel base and the lever on the SmartHead, which automatically adjusts to fit Presta or Schrader valves. Where plastic is used, it is robust and thick. At home or on the road, this pump is an impressively functional piece of kit that can take the place of an air compressor.

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Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price Check Price at Backcountry
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$120 List$45.00 at REI$69.99 at Amazon
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Check Price at REI
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Pros Excellent performance, universal nozzle, long hose, air bleed valve, easy to read gaugeNozzle works with Presta and Schrader valves, accurate, well-placed pressure relief valveInexpensive, stable, comfortable, auto select nozzle for Presta and Schrader valvesWorks great with high volume tires, stable, universal nozzle works with Presta and SchraderEfficient at high volumes, settings for road and MTB tires, double-sided nozzle
Cons Expensive, heavy, hard work to fill chamber, gauge struggles at low pressuresExpensive, heavy, tippy in one direction, not great for high-volume tiresNozzle can be tricky to use, no ball or bladder adaptersNot so great with high-pressure tires, gauge is harder to read than someMore expensive, inaccurate above 30 PSI, tall for shorter users, no bleeder valve
Bottom Line A high-quality and high priced model that replaces an air compressor to inflate tubeless tiresWith a bleeder valve in its handle and a nozzle that works with Schrader and Presta valves, this pump does its job wellA comfortable pump with an auto selecting nozzle and low price tagThis high-value pump works exceptionally well with high volume tires and features a universal nozzleThe fastest pump for high volume mountain bike tires that we tested
Rating Categories Topeak JoeBlow Booster Specialized Air Too... Bontrager Charger Crankbrothers Sterling Topeak JoeBlow Spor...
Ease Of Attachment (25%)
6.0
9.0
5.0
8.0
6.0
Inflation (25%)
6.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
9.0
Stability (20%)
8.0
6.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Accuracy (15%)
6.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
2.0
Gauge (15%)
8.0
8.0
7.0
5.0
5.0
Specs Topeak JoeBlow Booster Specialized Air Too... Bontrager Charger Crankbrothers Sterling Topeak JoeBlow Spor...
Max PSI 160 140 160 160 160
High Volume or High Pressure High Pressure Both Both Both Both
Weight 7.5 lbs 4.9 lbs 3.1 lbs 2.7 lbs 4.8 lbs
Height 29 in 25 in 27 in 25 in 29.75 in
Hose Length 59 in 45.5 in 38 in 36 in 32 in
Tubeless Recommended? Yes No No No No
Accessory Inflators Included? No No No Yes Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

Despite the many advantages of tubeless tires, it can be a real drag when you're excited to slap some new rubber on your ride, and the bike shop is backed up with work and can't get you rolling without a wait. The JoeBlow Booster solves this problem with the capacity to store one liter of air at 160 PSI in an integrated high-pressure chamber that works just like an air compressor to seat tubeless tire beads. When not used for installing tubeless tires, the Booster functions in the same manner as a regular floor pump, albeit a bit heavier.

Performance Comparison


The Topeak Booster is a substantial piece of equipment that will...
The Topeak Booster is a substantial piece of equipment that will seat your tubeless tires in minutes.
Photo: Clark Tate

Ease of Attachment


The SmartHead on the Booster automatically adapts to accept both Presta and Schrader valves without the need to flip, unscrew, or otherwise manipulate the head. It works well with both valve types but can be harder to seat when your tire is flat. We're pleased that this pump employs a strong metal locking lever. It's large, moves smoothly, and is easy to use. The portion of the head that inserts onto the valve and holds the internals secure is also alloy.


The 59-inch python of a hose on the Booster is longer than any other model we tested. The hose has an even greater effective length since it originates from the top of the pump. It has no trouble inflating tires set on a workbench or when the bike is suspended in a bike work stand. Pressing the SmartHead onto a Presta valve is easy, although you often need two hands to flip the lever without losing much air during attachment.

The Booster's Switchhitter gauge moves seamlessly between Schrader...
The Booster's Switchhitter gauge moves seamlessly between Schrader and Presta valves.
Photo: Clark Tate

Inflation


When used as a regular floor pump (with the selector dial on inflate mode), the Booster does a good job inflating high-pressure tires. It only requires a couple more compressions to get a road tire up to pressure than the best options. A high-volume mountain bike tire takes much longer, requiring 30 compressions to take it from 10 to 30 PSI. This pump was the slowest in the test at that task. The pace feels casual, though. The road tires require more power, but a stiff plastic handle and super stable steel base transfer it effectively.


To seat tubeless tires with this pump, set the selector dial to charge and start pumping. Your goal is to raise the pressure in the accessory chamber to 160 PSI, giving it enough power to seat a tire bead. It's not that challenging until you hit about 120 PSI, then a glisten will likely appear on your forehead with the last dozen or so strokes.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Filling the chamber required an average of 50 pumps. Assuming that satisfying ping, ping of rubber snapping into place against the rim is achieved, determining final tire pressure is the next step. If the tire bead seated properly, but you need additional air to achieve a certain pressure rating, simply give the handle a few strokes, and the pump functions like a regular floor pump. If pressure is too great, it has an air release valve just below the gauge for minute pressure adjustments (and there's a second one on the nozzle.)

Charging the Booster to 160 for a tire seating blast takes a little...
Charging the Booster to 160 for a tire seating blast takes a little time and perseverance.
Photo: Clark Tate

Stability


A wide, wing-shaped steel base measures nearly 10 inches across, allowing you to firmly plant your feet and blast away when filling the high-pressure chamber of the Booster.


The non-rubberized underside is best used outdoors on a surface you don't care much about marring. We recommend a mat or a towel for more delicate surfaces. We also appreciate that the plastic plate that attaches the pump and compressor barrel to the baseplate is sturdy. It's tall too, which increases height behind the gauge, providing further stability.

The winged base of the Booster is weighty steel and broad enough to...
The winged base of the Booster is weighty steel and broad enough to be very stable, even on a lawn.
Photo: Clark Tate


We also like the hose storage system, which tucks it out of the way while protecting the nozzle. The hose travels to the bottom of the pump to a clamp, then back to the top to another clamp, and finally over the handle to a final clamp on the far side. We mentioned that the hose is long, right? This system works well. And, though the flexible hose does take on the turns the storage system enforces, they aren't so entrenched that you have to fight with them to use it.

The Booster is the heaviest pump we tested by far. It's a lot...
The Booster is the heaviest pump we tested by far. It's a lot lighter than an air compressor though.
Photo: Clark Tate

Accuracy


Few of the pumps we tested really blew us away with their accuracy. This pump was no different, often showing pressure differences up to 4 PSI when compared to our digital gauge readings, but only on lower pressure readings around 30 PSI. At higher pressure levels, around 80 and above, it performs much better.


This is unfortunate since this is a great option for mountain bikers devoted to tubeless tires. But it's hardly unique. Most pumps we tested could use a separate gauge to double-check their low-pressure accuracy, especially for fat or plus-sized tires. If you use tubeless road or cyclocross tires, you'll have better luck nailing your pressures with this pump.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Gauge


The top-mounting, analog gauge on the Booster was among our test favorites. The gauge is set high on the pump, and the PSI pressure values are printed in white along the perimeter, set against a black background. The Bar numbers are under the glass, still easy to see but subject to glare.


The gauge measures pressure up to 160 PSI (11 Bar), and, like the majority of pumps we tested, it isn't optimized to read lower pressures. The needle quickly speeds through the all-important 20s and 30s on its way to 160 PSI. Broad intervals plague precise readings. Each tick mark accounts for 5 whole PSI.

Mounted on top of the shaft, this gauge is much easier to read than...
Mounted on top of the shaft, this gauge is much easier to read than the rest.
Photo: Clark Tate

The gauge is surrounded by a selector dial that switches the pump between "charge" and "inflate" modes. Again, you turn the selector dial to charge to fill the accessory air chamber to 160 PSI and rotate it to inflate to blast the air into the tire to seat it in the rim. When the red line is set to inflate, the pump works like a traditional floor pump.

Switching between charge and inflate is easy on the Booster.
Switching between charge and inflate is easy on the Booster.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Value


This is one of the most expensive pumps we've tested. You'd have to put a ton of miles on your bike and burn through tubeless tires quickly to break even to save money on tire installation alone. After you factor in gas, delays, and time spent, though, it might start looking like a better deal. Working on your own bike can also be fun, in a wrench throwing kind of way, and inspire confidence in your knowledge.

You might be able to find a deal on a cheap garage-sized air compressor instead, but you'd still need a floor pump to keep track of your pressure and because it's easier for a quick fill. Bottom line, this pump is expensive, but it's worth it for the right person.

We really appreciate the universal nozzle on this pump.
We really appreciate the universal nozzle on this pump.
Photo: Clark Tate

Conclusion


The Topeak JoeBlow Booster is a useful addition to your shop. It lets you seat a tubeless tire bead on your own, without paying a shop or buying an air compressor. It's expensive and heavy, but if this pump is right for you (you know who you are), then we think you'll be psyched to have it in your arsenal.

It's common to lose some sealant in the tube seating process.
It's common to lose some sealant in the tube seating process.
Photo: Clark Tate

Clark Tate